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Deburring drill shanks, is there a right way?

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  • Deburring drill shanks, is there a right way?

    The toolroom that I am working in has 100's of drill bits and there are many, if not most, of them that have burred up shanks. They are still useable as is for work in the shop or field, but it would be nice to clean up some of the worst ones. Also, it makes it harder to chuck them up in the Darex sharpener.

    Can anyone suggest an effective way to deburr them without going overboard? I have seen them cleaned up on a belt sander before, but it is very easy to get carried away with that.

    Thanks for the help.
    R.J.

  • #2
    I use a fine(ish) file. Try to just hit the burr and with the last few strokes follow the curve of the drill shank. I think any sort of mechanical device runs the high risk of removing more than you want to
    .

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    • #3
      I chuck the drill part in the lathe and use a fine file to file off the high spots being careful to NOT cut the real taper. It takes some practice to do it right but it works just fine. Try to find a dull file to do this.
      It's only ink and paper

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      • #4
        I just do it by hand with a normal file, or diamond coated file.. Normal file works because the shanks are typicaly not hardened, thats why they burr up in the first place.. (its that, or your chuck)

        The only problem with removing the burrs, is then they slip in the drill chuck again untill a nice burr is raised
        (The burr kinda helps keep the drill from sliping)
        Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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        • #5
          Filing off by hand is the best way to avoid damaging the shank. I NEVER use diamonds,though,where any loose ones can get into a hole,or other machine component. Once they get in there,there in for good. Soft shanks don't need diamond files.

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          • #6
            I find that the burrs are usually in one place and leave a groove partially around the shank with a built up knob at it's end. I have used files and even grinding wheels in the past, but presently I prefer to use a small stone (1/4" diameter) in the Dremel. I hold the drill at a right angle to the Dremel axis and try to hit the built up knob only. You can take it out to below the shank's OD but the remaining, untouched area above and below this small notch will allow chucking it properly. I use a strip of fine (150-220 grit) sandpaper like a shoe polishing rag to remove any remaining roughness. Most drill chucks are not that accurate, but if you are anal about it, you can rotate the drill and sand it in that manner from three or four equally spaced directions to take the same amount off all sides. Hold it with aluminum or wood jaws in the shop vise for this sanding.

            This goes very quickly and the worst part is taking the Dremel out and putting it away. Save up several damaged drills to do at once and the process is much more efficient.
            Paul A.
            SE Texas

            Make it fit.
            You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

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            • #7
              I just grind off the "knob" on the edge of a grinding wheel. I don't make the slightest attempt to get it flush, in fact I grind it deeper.
              By chance, I later saw exactly that procedure done by a professional tool grinder.


              Nick

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              • #8
                pretty much the same as Nick here
                Ernie (VE7ERN)

                May the wind be always at your back

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                • #9
                  [The only problem with removing the burrs, is then they slip in the drill chuck again untill a nice burr is raised
                  (The burr kinda helps keep the drill from sliping)[/QUOTE]

                  Maybe the shaft should be Knurled to begin with!!

                  Rgds
                  Michael

                  Australia

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                  • #10
                    I just kiss it on the belt sander. Bye bye burr-y.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by miker
                      [The only problem with removing the burrs, is then they slip in the drill chuck again untill a nice burr is raised
                      (The burr kinda helps keep the drill from sliping)
                      Maybe the shaft should be Knurled to begin with!!

                      Rgds[/quote]
                      Or just get those bits with the three flats at 120° :-) They WONT
                      slip.
                      ...Lew...

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                      • #12
                        Thanks to all for the suggestions. That should make me good and dangerous. I give it a try.

                        R.J.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MuellerNick
                          I just grind off the "knob" on the edge of a grinding wheel. I don't make the slightest attempt to get it flush, in fact I grind it deeper.



                          Nick
                          same here.

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                          • #14
                            WHAT is the point of further defacing your drill by grinding it DEEPER? It isn't going to GROW back taller,like a plant,after you file it flush. I'd NEVER use a grinder. Use a file.

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                            • #15
                              Take a piece of old file, and stone the teeth until they have small flats on them. Now that piece of file will cut only down to a good surface and stop.

                              You can safely use it to stone off burrs on drills (stroke it lengthwise) or anything where you would rather just cut off the part that sticks up, and stop before cutting into the 'good" material. Just stroke it as long as there is resistance. When you have cut all the burrs off, it will slide free, and you know you are done.
                              1601

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

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