Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OT Battery Connections That Corrode

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • darryl
    replied
    I haven't followed this thread in a while now, but just to throw in an idea- why not wax and polish the top surface of a battery- it would tend to make any moisture bead up and not form a conductive path across it. Won't help with corrosion inside a terminal, but it sure could help the general cleanliness of the battery. Just a thought-

    Leave a comment:


  • Peter S
    replied
    One of the problems I see in figuring out the cause of this problem is that it sometimes takes a long time for a battery terminal to corrode. For example, I may have to clean a terminal once every two years. It makes comparisons difficult.

    I reckon my batteries get a sort of sheen or film (acid?) over their plastic top surface after a year or two of use, not sure where it comes from, but suspect from being used, charged etc. I know when your charging rate is not correct you can get fuming, even enough to damage paint nearby! One of my batteries (Hella) has a vent tube fitted which allows you to pipe it clear of any panels etc.
    Last edited by Peter S; 12-05-2010, 09:05 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • spope14
    replied
    I use electrolytic grease or the red stuff from the little spray bottle, which ever I can find on hand at the moment. Buy one can of each these they last nearly a lifetime. May have to try never seize....have a bottle of this as well - somewhere......

    I have cleaned terminals with that circuit board cleaner spray on cleaner as well. Have a few cans of that on hand, but the life span of that on a shelf is probably quite a bit less, though mine is at about five years.....

    Easy, quick, cheap application, money and effort saved in the long run.

    I Use the electrolytic grease for trailer hitch 4 way light connects to prevent corrosion from our wonderfully salt and brined roads as well.
    Last edited by spope14; 12-05-2010, 10:40 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • jkilroy
    replied
    Vasaline it down whenever you pop the hood. The terminals will look new for as long as you do. If you are shopping for a quality battery, I use Concorde AGM (absorbed glass mat) batteries. They are totally sealed, as in you can mount them upside down, with no loose electrolite, you can cut a hole in the case and nothing will leak out. I do a lot of solar stuff and thats how I found them, originally made for aircraft use, where acid fumes could be VERY bad.

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    The most likely explanation is a poor connection in the negative terminal connector. That effectively moves the positive connection to that point since that will then be where the greatest voltage drop will be across dissimilar metals.

    Leave a comment:


  • J. Randall
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan
    We are talking about why the battery terminal corrode (or don't corrode). The steel bit in that picture are rusty. That has nothing to do with the usual battery terminal corrosion. It is due to stray currents, not unions.



    That is precisely what is to be expected if stray currents are traveling between the battery posts along the top surface of the battery. It isn't limited to that though. Any current that must pass through the terminals regardless of which way it goes will produce galvanic corrosion. Sombody wondered why it affects the positive terminal only. That is because the positive terminal is the ion doner. The negative terminal is the acceptor for the ions so it is being plated instead of deplated (depleted?).

    This same concept is used in active anticorrosion systems on metal hulled boats, especially aluminum hulls in salt water. Using a trickle current from the engine battery the negative is connected to the hull and the positive is connected to a series of insulated zinc blocks below the water line. By using battery voltage to power the system the hull is forced to be more negative than any other material on the boat, especially the zinc blocks. The active system overcomes passivation that is produced when a coating of zinc oxide builds up on the zinc anodes.

    BTW, my Land Rover has a 90 amp alternator that I rewired for positive ground.
    Evan, I am pretty familiar with impressed current systems, and sacrificial anodes, I worked as a corrosion tech for about 3 yrs. taking care of a big pipeline gathering system. I did ask in a previous question why the neg post on a Ford vehicle I once owned would corrode and the positive post did not. Never could get anyone to explain that to me. It was a 95 model and wired no different than millions of others on the road.
    James

    Leave a comment:


  • Rich Carlstedt
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan
    ............ It is due to stray currents, .
    That is precisely what is to be expected if stray currents are traveling between the battery posts along the top surface of the battery. ........ Sombody wondered why it affects the positive terminal only. That is because the positive terminal is the ion doner. The negative terminal is the acceptor for the ions so it is being plated instead of deplated (depleted?).
    ..
    Evan, that makes perfect sense.
    I always thought it was a gas based corriosion situation, but coupled with the hot water comments made earlier, the picture is clear.
    Thanks
    Rich

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    Noalox contains 20% zinc dust. It works the same way that the anti corrosion systems on a boat work. Same as galvanized metal and the same as zinc loaded paint. When zinc is paired up with most other metals the zinc will corrode in preference to the other metal. It acts as a sacrificial anode.

    Leave a comment:


  • rws
    replied
    A last question. Would that stuff "NOLOX" work? I hope I spelled it right, it's the goop you squeeze into making up aluminum wire connections. Maybe not as messy as grease.

    Leave a comment:


  • Willy
    replied
    Originally posted by gary350
    ....... Did anyone every wonder why all the factories moved to China.
    Yeah so they can put two kids on a rice mat, work em back to back twelve hour shifts, then give each of em' a bowl of sand and a fish head to eat and fifteen cents for their trouble for the day. Oh yeah and when they are finished dumping on the workers they are more than welcome to dump their toxic sh!t on mother nature as well.

    Unions have their issues...I've been there, but don't think the employers in China or here for that matter are standing in line to give out bonuses without a little persuasion. The only thing that makes a strong union is a poor employer. Not that poor employees should should be able to use a union as a crutch either, way too much of that goes on as well. As usual, somewhere in the middle of the argument lies the truth.

    Yeah it's great not having any guidelines. Don't worry it'll all be a level playing field soon.

    And now back to our regularly scheduled programming.

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    We are talking about why the battery terminal corrode (or don't corrode). The steel bit in that picture are rusty. That has nothing to do with the usual battery terminal corrosion. It is due to stray currents, not unions.

    Originally posted by Rich
    100 year old solution is to
    just put one or two penny's on top of the battery.
    Copper is more active than lead and the penny's will attract all corrosive vapers.
    That is precisely what is to be expected if stray currents are traveling between the battery posts along the top surface of the battery. It isn't limited to that though. Any current that must pass through the terminals regardless of which way it goes will produce galvanic corrosion. Sombody wondered why it affects the positive terminal only. That is because the positive terminal is the ion doner. The negative terminal is the acceptor for the ions so it is being plated instead of deplated (depleted?).

    This same concept is used in active anticorrosion systems on metal hulled boats, especially aluminum hulls in salt water. Using a trickle current from the engine battery the negative is connected to the hull and the positive is connected to a series of insulated zinc blocks below the water line. By using battery voltage to power the system the hull is forced to be more negative than any other material on the boat, especially the zinc blocks. The active system overcomes passivation that is produced when a coating of zinc oxide builds up on the zinc anodes.

    BTW, my Land Rover has a 90 amp alternator that I rewired for positive ground.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by Evan
    That all sounds good in theory but isn't the real answer. There are different materials in the battery connector than in the lead from which the battery terminal is made. Battery lead has antimony alloyed to make it stronger but the connectors, if lead, do not since it also makes the lead more brittle. Some connectors now aren't even lead at all which is a stupid cost saving trick that doesn't work. My PT Cruiser has copper plated steel terminals and you can watch it corrode while doing an oil change.

    It's all about galvanic corrosion promoted by the acid fumes and caused by the continuous electrical micro currents that exist in all modern vehicles including trailers with water tank monitors and clocks.

    These are the terminals on my Land Rover. While they are somewhat rusty but there is zero acid corrosion since 1959.

    As you can see from the sticker the current battery has been installed since 1999. No corrosion.


    I thought we were talking about why the battery terminal corrodes not all the other stuff, steel flat washers, steel sheet metal pieces, steel bolts, copper plated steel terminals, wires, crap, etc. Naturally all that other stuff is going to corrode because it was made Cheap in USA by a Union factory. Kick out the Union the factory becomes efficient and can make things with good quality parts at a cheaper price. Federal Law gives all workers all the same rights Unions claim to give only it is FREE, FREE, FREE. Did anyone every wonder why all the factories moved to China.

    Leave a comment:


  • Willy
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan
    .........

    If terminal corrosion isn't due to stray current then how come precharged new batteries don't corrode?
    Not sure Evan, perhaps months of not being exposed to atmospheric contaminants, combined with a moist layer of sulphuric acid on top of the battery, in addition to not having dissimilar cable ends clamped to the posts might be a factor. Never mind the repeated discharge/charge cycles that a dirty battery in use has been exposed to.

    Not exactly sure why your battery is as clean as it is, battery vent location and design is a big factor, as is the fact that your Landrover having a generator instead of an alternator may have a more gentle charging rate.

    But I've owned a lot of equipment and vehicles with absolutely no electronics which could impose a parasitic drain, and I can say unequivocally that dirty battery posts are not a new phenomena associated with stray background currents. This problem has been around for a long time.

    Yes, boiling water and a smear of grease are a pretty low cost and effective form of battery maintenance, I thought everyone knew.
    Last edited by Willy; 12-03-2010, 11:19 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    terminal corrosion has been around forever, including old Landrovers.....
    Not mine. The battery is sold by Canadian Tire. I don't know who actually makes it. It is a deep discharge battery because the hydraulic pump on the snow blade is electric. It's not your usual electric snow blade pump but the type used on Dept of Hiways snow plows. It draws about the same as a starter motor and will lift the blade in 2 seconds.

    If terminal corrosion isn't due to stray current then how come precharged new batteries don't corrode?

    Leave a comment:


  • Highpower
    replied
    Peter, I guess it will remain our little secret.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X