Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Can I tow a BP down the street on the shop crane?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • MickeyD
    replied
    Since you have an engine hoist, rent or borrow a crappy little trailer and move it on that. Don't be scared to overload it, you are only going a few hundred feet, just make sure you tie down the BP so that it does not tip. My old next door neighbor and I used to swap a lot of machinery back and forth and that is how we did it. Damn engine hoists try to tip just moving them in the garage, I would hate to hit a pot hole with one while your mill swings around.

    Leave a comment:


  • aboard_epsilon
    replied
    yes we have the big square ones that have doors at the back ..they are all carried by the same type design of lifting mechanism on a of truck ..

    truck size is relatrive to skip size .

    there are skips from 1 ton upwards


    funny thing is when they first introduced the word "skip" over here i thought the word was an Americanism...or more likly Australian

    all the best.markj
    Last edited by aboard_epsilon; 12-05-2010, 11:43 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Duffy
    replied
    Skip trucks

    Dumpsters are not the same as your skips. They are generally smaller and used almost exclusively for commercial waste from stores and restaurants. For demolition and industrial waste we use bins. They have latching double rear doors and are loaded and carried by dedicated trucks. Around here, the big ones are 30 cubic metres, (or 30 cu. yds. close enough.) The house next door, being demolished/renovated/rebuilt, filled three of them at a hair over $1000.00 a pop for disposal.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Fixer
    replied
    Tow Truck

    I moved mine in with a tow truck, piece of cake. He was able to boom it right inside.
    Not worth dickin around with any other way. IMHO
    al

    Leave a comment:


  • aboard_epsilon
    replied
    Originally posted by Arthur.Marks
    I, for one, have never seen or heard of such a thing in the US.
    they call them dumpsters in the us ..and you guys are always on about diving in them so they must exist ..

    all the best.markj

    Leave a comment:


  • Circlip
    replied
    There's an ulterior motive to his worships posting, drop the Bridgy in the skip and take it to the scrappy

    Regards Ian.

    Leave a comment:


  • jep24601
    replied
    I think you could just drag that on a good pallet adequately bolted down. Have two helpers with pry bars to help at any road imperfections. Keep the tow rope long to avoid lifting the front of the pallet too much. Have some steel pipe handy as rollers if you need them. Go slow. Wave at neighbors.

    Leave a comment:


  • smalltime
    replied
    Tow truck + twenty minutes + cash = moved BP.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arthur.Marks
    replied
    Originally posted by John Stevenson
    Do you guys have skip trucks in the US ? or is it a European thing?
    I, for one, have never seen or heard of such a thing in the US.

    Leave a comment:


  • RichTes
    replied
    Thanks all. Going to have a real problem getting it in the garage door on my side, so may have to do like I've done on other machines and shorten it. I pulled a Van Norman #10 (1,400lbs) up and down the ramp on my trailer with the electric winch, so if the BP were a little lighter could probably do the same.

    Been looking at larger 6" wheels for the hoist. Guess I better get moving on that.

    Rich

    Leave a comment:


  • Rex
    replied
    Originally posted by Robin R
    If you were determined to try using the engine crane, span between the feet with some sturdy boards and lower the mill down onto them while keeping a little weight on the boom.
    +1 THis is the way to do it if you stick with your original plan

    Be sure to lower the head down onto the table to get the CG low as possible.

    Leave a comment:


  • rock_breaker
    replied
    Just moved an 1100 pound lathe, I put the machine on planks then rolled it off of the trailer onto shop floor. Used 1/2" pipe under the planks, I used several 2" x 8" x 6 feet planks and a lot of cribbing blocks to get from trailer to shop. I failed to crib the back end of the trailer after unhooking but fortunately a step in walkway prevented disaster.


    It seems like the short horizontal distance leads one to jury rig the move, as has been indicated above keep it close to the ground, balanced and secure from tipping. The comment about America's Funiest Home vidieos cannot be over emphaszed !!! In actuality there is not a great difference between a 300 foot move and a 300 mile move, the stability of the machine must be top priority since the safety of the people and the machine depend on it.

    It takes lots of cribbing to keep the machine stabile. but you can roll up and down ramps etc. as long as they are not steeper than the machines tipping angle. Keep the support under the planks close together to prevent breaking the planks.

    Leave a comment:


  • John Stevenson
    replied
    Do you guys have skip trucks in the US ? or is it a European thing ?



    These are awesome for moving machines as once hanging from the chains they CANNOT tip over.
    They lift vertical, move over the bed horizontally and lower vertically.
    No inclined ramps that give you heart attacks.

    Once on board you strap the machine to the lift arms and again it can't move, fall over etc.

    At full extent they finish up with the top only about 5' off the floor.
    I have even had them poke the arms into the shop, grab a machine and move forward until they are clear to lift.

    They are plentiful around here, 15 pages of entry's in the local yellow pages and that doesn't cover builders merchants who run they for their own needs.

    Nice thing is the people who operate these offer the lift / load as a service when you hire a skip, they do not have the same mindset as riggers who charge by the hour.

    That one in the picture can handle about 14 tons lift but you can get them based on small trucks classes as mini skip.



    One similar to this collected and delivered my Victoria U2 universal mill with no bother.

    Leave a comment:


  • davidwdyer
    replied
    One time I bought some square tubing to fit inside the engine hoist "feet," cut and welded an angle on both sides (sort of like an "L") and then put on car hubs with wheels and tires.

    On the other end I welded a trailer hitch.

    I moved many Bridgeports around a farm yard between the barn and the garage with this latch up. (I was buying and selling used ones at the time.) You have to go slow and keep them from swinging, but it works. However, it's a lot of work just to move one.

    Leave a comment:


  • bob ward
    replied
    Find someone who runs a crane truck and offer cash $$ for a 20 minute job. Safe and cheap.

    If you DIY with decent size wheels on a suitable frame, a mill of that weight can easily be moved by hand. If you need to tow with the tractor to overcome the drag of small crappy wheels, keep your camera rolling for your entry in Funniest Home Video.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X