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Can I tow a BP down the street on the shop crane?

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  • Can I tow a BP down the street on the shop crane?

    Had to let a neighbor stick my BP in his garage, but won't be able to get out with the forklift. Five houses down the street. Garage to garage move.

    I feel safer with the hoist than a pallet jack. Have a 13hp diesel Iseki tractor with a little front end loader that I can pull it along with. Was going to attach the hoist to the loader for stability.

    Any reasons this is that bad of an idea? Can't lift it with the loader, but sure can pull/push it along in low gear.

    Rich

  • #2
    If it stops suddenly on a pebble or curb or starts to swing out past the feet, you're done with it.

    I'd be inclined to move an anchor point and winch it by hand or borrow a trailer for the afternoon, but that is just me.

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    • #3
      If it's my street and you're looking for a good home for it, then yes, definitely.

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      • #4
        I have a trailer with a ramp, but getting it on and off the trailer seems harder than finding a way to keep it on the ground.

        That's why it's there - couldn't get it off the trailer easily

        Rich

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        • #5
          Build a good heavy angle iron frame and add some Horror Fright pneumatic wheel/tires. Frame would just fit the base of the BP. Tow entire assembly home safely. This way, it won't be swinging, soft tires or wheels will absorb small road imperfections, curb transitions, and pebbles. Also if designed properly, just leave it on the frame in the shop, just jack each end up and remove the 4 wheels.

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          • #6
            For a short distance like that I'd hire someone with a tow truck. Just pick it up with the boom, tie a couple of tag-lines to it and crawl down the street.

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            • #7
              If you were determined to try using the engine crane, span between the feet with some sturdy boards and lower the mill down onto them while keeping a little weight on the boom.

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              • #8
                From go to whoa

                If one of the cast-iron wheels on the engine hoist brakes you are going to have a real problem.

                I'd use a fork lift if the mill could be moved out of the garage onto the concrete apron - and move it to your apron.

                Failing that, I'd use a tilt-tray tow truck with a good power winch and tie-downs.

                I'd have the mill on a pallet.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by x39
                  For a short distance like that I'd hire someone with a tow truck. Just pick it up with the boom, tie a couple of tag-lines to it and crawl down the street.
                  tow truck. crawl. Around here those are mutually exclusive. I have one friend who was t-boned by a tow truck and I arrived at the scene of another accident, before the ambulances, where a tow truck t-boned a pickup. Two of the occupants were dead and the other was still in a coma 2 months later.

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                  • #10
                    Find someone who runs a crane truck and offer cash $$ for a 20 minute job. Safe and cheap.

                    If you DIY with decent size wheels on a suitable frame, a mill of that weight can easily be moved by hand. If you need to tow with the tractor to overcome the drag of small crappy wheels, keep your camera rolling for your entry in Funniest Home Video.

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                    • #11
                      One time I bought some square tubing to fit inside the engine hoist "feet," cut and welded an angle on both sides (sort of like an "L") and then put on car hubs with wheels and tires.

                      On the other end I welded a trailer hitch.

                      I moved many Bridgeports around a farm yard between the barn and the garage with this latch up. (I was buying and selling used ones at the time.) You have to go slow and keep them from swinging, but it works. However, it's a lot of work just to move one.
                      VitŮŽria, Brazil

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                      • #12
                        Do you guys have skip trucks in the US ? or is it a European thing ?



                        These are awesome for moving machines as once hanging from the chains they CANNOT tip over.
                        They lift vertical, move over the bed horizontally and lower vertically.
                        No inclined ramps that give you heart attacks.

                        Once on board you strap the machine to the lift arms and again it can't move, fall over etc.

                        At full extent they finish up with the top only about 5' off the floor.
                        I have even had them poke the arms into the shop, grab a machine and move forward until they are clear to lift.

                        They are plentiful around here, 15 pages of entry's in the local yellow pages and that doesn't cover builders merchants who run they for their own needs.

                        Nice thing is the people who operate these offer the lift / load as a service when you hire a skip, they do not have the same mindset as riggers who charge by the hour.

                        That one in the picture can handle about 14 tons lift but you can get them based on small trucks classes as mini skip.



                        One similar to this collected and delivered my Victoria U2 universal mill with no bother.
                        .

                        Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                        • #13
                          Just moved an 1100 pound lathe, I put the machine on planks then rolled it off of the trailer onto shop floor. Used 1/2" pipe under the planks, I used several 2" x 8" x 6 feet planks and a lot of cribbing blocks to get from trailer to shop. I failed to crib the back end of the trailer after unhooking but fortunately a step in walkway prevented disaster.


                          It seems like the short horizontal distance leads one to jury rig the move, as has been indicated above keep it close to the ground, balanced and secure from tipping. The comment about America's Funiest Home vidieos cannot be over emphaszed !!! In actuality there is not a great difference between a 300 foot move and a 300 mile move, the stability of the machine must be top priority since the safety of the people and the machine depend on it.

                          It takes lots of cribbing to keep the machine stabile. but you can roll up and down ramps etc. as long as they are not steeper than the machines tipping angle. Keep the support under the planks close together to prevent breaking the planks.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Robin R
                            If you were determined to try using the engine crane, span between the feet with some sturdy boards and lower the mill down onto them while keeping a little weight on the boom.
                            +1 THis is the way to do it if you stick with your original plan

                            Be sure to lower the head down onto the table to get the CG low as possible.

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                            • #15
                              Thanks all. Going to have a real problem getting it in the garage door on my side, so may have to do like I've done on other machines and shorten it. I pulled a Van Norman #10 (1,400lbs) up and down the ramp on my trailer with the electric winch, so if the BP were a little lighter could probably do the same.

                              Been looking at larger 6" wheels for the hoist. Guess I better get moving on that.

                              Rich

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