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  • I need a tool to build a tool to build a tool!

    I am sure you all have gone down this road!

    I need a angle plate for my horizontal mill. 12"X 12" X minimum 1" thick plates.

    What would be the best way to build this angle plate? Normally I would cut the plates, square them up on the mill and then weld them together with the braces on the back. Then I would heat it in an oven to 700 plus degrees and let it cool slowly. After that I would bolt it down on the mill and face the two sides.

    I then thought maybe I would be better to bolt it together and not weld.

    So how would you all build one?
    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  • #2
    I'd weld it because I'm a welder.
    Andy

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    • #3
      I would go to a steel supplier and buy a short piece of channel iron and square that up. It will be very close to start with so the work will be minimal.
      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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      • #4
        "After that I would bolt it down on the mill and face the two sides."

        How would you position a 12" angle plate on the mill table to you could face the entire surface?
        Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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        • #5
          I would make it out of angle iron as I have done in the past. It's fast and easy. Of course, buying one is easier.
          It's only ink and paper

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          • #6
            I'd weld it. Then I'd put it into my oven if it would fit. If that oven is too small, I wouldn't stress relief it.
            If I would need a precise angle plate, I'd buy a cheap one out of CI and scrape it to my standard (that is very low ).


            Nick

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Evan
              I would go to a steel supplier and buy a short piece of channel iron and square that up. It will be very close to start with so the work will be minimal.
              Channel iron?????

              Brian
              OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

              THINK HARDER

              BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

              MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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              • #8
                It looks as though the replies have it nearly covered. Now you need to decide on what you are trying to accomplish in the end.

                Do you need something quick and dirty to just get by? Then weld up a bunch of angle iron and let her rip.

                Want something that will give you a few months of light service or a year or so of intermittent service? Order the channel and have at it.

                If you want something that will be a tool in your shop that you can use for years? In order - rough cut, weld, anneal, mill, drill, and use.

                Sometimes is it hard to decide how to go about making a tool because you haven't decided how much value it should have when you are done. In manufacturing, we did what we had to quickly so as to just get the job done. In tooling, we made things to last and had to invest more time into the project.

                What are you willing to invest?
                rock~
                Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

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                • #9
                  Structural shapes do not meet the 12" X 12" X 1" thick specs desired, so purchase of angle or channel will not work.

                  Beyond that, it depends on your resources and desired accuracy. I would prefer the bolted assembly myself as it would probably entail less work than the welded and stress relieved construction and be every bit as accurate and serviceable. With reasonable care in machining the components, final maching of the complete assembly would be minimal if needed at all.
                  Jim H.

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                  • #10
                    After you weld them put them in a furnace or fire to relieve the weld stresses. A bag of BBQ charcoal works great so does a pile of unwanted old pallets. After they have been welded and heated to about 1100 degrees and air cooled they are ready to square in the mill.

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                    • #11
                      I really like to weld and I am a much better weldor than machinist! But I think it would be very enjoyable to bolt it together. I try it and let you know.

                      As to the question regarding how I would mill it after I bolted it to the table. That is easy. It is a horizontal mill. I would let it hang over the table on the spindle side and have at it. Easy to do with a six inch face mill.
                      Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                      How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                      • #12
                        Don't forget......we require pictures as you progress
                        Ernie (VE7ERN)

                        May the wind be always at your back

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                        • #13
                          Structural shapes do not meet the 12" X 12" X 1" thick specs desired, so purchase of angle or channel will not work.
                          If you buy the right grade they do. Angle is available in 8x8 and larger in 1" thickness. Channel is rated by weight per foot and is available in 12" depth at 30 to 50 lbs per foot.
                          Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                          • #14
                            Angle Plate

                            Bolted joints can move, even with dowel pins. If you bolt it, put some heavy tack welds every couple of inches at the joint. An angle brace or two will help keep it square over time.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Evan
                              If you buy the right grade they do. Angle is available in 8x8 and larger in 1" thickness. Channel is rated by weight per foot and is available in 12" depth at 30 to 50 lbs per foot.
                              No standard 12" channel has a 1" web. The largest standard heavy angle is 8" X 8" x 1", again, not what was wanted. Good luck with buying a foot of either shape.
                              Jim H.

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