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OT: Accidental 3D pictures

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  • OT: Accidental 3D pictures

    I was reviewing some of my many pictures recently and suddenly realized that I may have a considerably larger collection of 3D images than I thought. When I photograph something I commonly take several images rather than just one. As it happens, if hand holding the camera it is very likely that a small horizontal shift may occur which inadvertantly produces a 3D image pair.

    Then I noticed that there is another way for a certain type of 3D image to form. Rather than moving the camera the subject can move instead. In this instance the subject is clouds which are a favorite subject of mine. My interest in astronomy extends to anythng related to the sky, both night and day. Searching through my collection I have found some interesting example of 3D images that were formed by the movement of clouds instead of the usual method od displacing the camera.

    This was the image that first alerted me to the possibility. It was taken from the top of Mt. Kobau at a star party. The images are encoded with an x for crossed eye or an = for parallel viewing. In some cases an interesting effect is produced both ways. The type of 3D effect produced here is a semi synthetic effect and does not necessarily represent the actual spatial relationships that existed.



    This next set are clouds back lighted by an intense aurora with a trace of light pollution on the right from town.





    This one is different in that the 3D effect is real as I took two images out the window while driving. This gave a very long baseline that reveals the 3 dimensional shape of the isolated cloud.



    continued
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  • #2





    This is best in parallel viewing mode. These are a rare phenomenon called "anti crepuscular rays".
    Last edited by Evan; 12-06-2010, 09:34 AM.
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    • #3
      Evan,

      Your "heavens in hyperstereo" collection is a real treat. That's the first time I've looked into an aurora, in 3D. I look forward to more of this, as you continue to take such pairs during the season.
      Allan Ostling

      Phoenix, Arizona

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      • #4
        I'm not seeing the 3d. Nice pictures though!
        Andy

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        • #5
          Not everybody can see 3D this way for reasons that remain unknown. My wife cannot see it at all no matter how hard she tries. I suspect it may have something to do with eye dominance. I am largely ambidextrous and that may also extend to vision. Someone with a strongly dominant eye probably has strongly dominant visual processing in the brain as well.
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          • #6
            Originally posted by vpt
            I'm not seeing the 3d. Nice pictures though!
            centre two images and go cross eye...there'll be in the centre of your view an image of that looks like two overlays....try with eyes to get these two images to line up and all of a sudden when eye/mind registed it you will lock onto it and be looking a three d image. Just don't stay that way
            .

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            • #7
              You may need to resize the stereo pair to match it for your particular monitor. Download the jpg to your desktop, then insert it into a cell in an Excel spreadsheet. The image can then be easily moved around the screen, and resized with the mouse. This is particularly helpful for parallel pairs, which need to have "homologous points" separated by a distance close to your interocular spacing (68mm for me).
              Allan Ostling

              Phoenix, Arizona

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              • #8
                That is pretty amazing. I have some similar photo series I've taken and I'll have to examine.

                This phenomenon is something I discovered as a kid. I found that by staring at the springs of the upper bunk bed I could merge adjacent rectangles at which time the surface became 3D. Same with bathroom floor tiles - the smaller the tile the easier, but with practice I could merge repeating objects wider than my eyes are apart (not looking cross-eyed - I must have looked like Marty Feldman, though).

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by dp
                  That is pretty amazing. I have some similar photo series I've taken and I'll have to examine.

                  This phenomenon is something I discovered as a kid. I found that by staring at the springs of the upper bunk bed I could merge adjacent rectangles at which time the surface became 3D. Same with bathroom floor tiles - the smaller the tile the easier, but with practice I could merge repeating objects wider than my eyes are apart (not looking cross-eyed - I must have looked like Marty Feldman, though).




                  I have been able to do something similar since a kid as well. If I stare long enough at pretty much anything it somehow my eyes focus differently and it will seem as though everything I look at is far away from me even though the objects are only feet away.

                  OP if I hold the monitor up to my face and go cross eyed and whatnot I can kind of see what you guys are talking about. It is like binoculars.
                  Andy

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                  • #10
                    I think you have it then.

                    Here are a few more.

                    This is from the Banff-Jasper National Park in the Rockies, both types.





                    This one just doesn't bear being reduced enough to view in parallel.





                    If that makes you feel cold then this one will warm you up a bit. It seems that even an amorphous background will produce a 3D effect for the foreground. Also crossed eye.


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                    • #11
                      Wow, nice effect. One thing for people that have a hard time "free viewing" stereo pairs to try is using two lenses, the objectives from that pair of 7X50 binoculars that got left on the roof of the car and fell off work. Hold one in front of each eye and vary the distance between them to get the images coincident.
                      Another 3D effect can be seen when imaging solar features in two slightly different wavelengths. This pair was 6563.3 Angstroms for the left image and 6562.3 Angstroms for the right one. These shifts correspond to +/- 22 kilometers per second in velocity, so material approaching the instrument appears to be out front.

                      Poor daytime seeing usually produces spurious effects but this one came out pretty well.

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                      • #12
                        Nice pictures, Evan. I got the narrower pictures to look 3D a lot easier than the wider ones. In fact, none of the wider ones worked for me.

                        The 2nd 'rock face' picture and the fire picture worked the best.

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                        • #13
                          Very cool. I wish I had some filters that narrow.
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                          • #14
                            pond scum

                            Even ordinary objects can mesmerize, in 3D. Here is a stereo pair of pond scum I took with my Stereo Wollensak about twenty years ago.


                            This is arranged for parallel viewing. I look at my mounted stereo slides with Kodaslide II viewer, which has a pair of outstanding eyepieces. That is 3D viewing at its best.
                            Last edited by aostling; 12-06-2010, 10:18 PM.
                            Allan Ostling

                            Phoenix, Arizona

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                            • #15
                              Tony,

                              Just capture the screen and stick in your favorite image program and reduce them.
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