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OT drywalling ceiling, no drywall jack? no problem

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  • OT drywalling ceiling, no drywall jack? no problem

    I started drywalling my ceiling today, something I've wanted to do for 2 years now. For those two years I also pondered on how to get the drywall to the ceiling without a drywall jack. Today I came up with an idea. I only got to ruin one sheet of drywall tonight but the "jack" worked perfectly.

    A quick question as well. I bought the 5/8" drywall (what I was told for ceilings) but what spacing is recommended for the screws on ceiling pieces?








    Andy

  • #2





    After tearing up that first piece I decided the "table" needed some padding.

    Andy

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    • #3
      Vpt, quite the idea, and good thinking!

      I would suggest, if it's not too late to place the drywall sheets perpendicular to the ceiling joist and not parallel.

      I used 1 screw at the seams and three somewhat equally spaced in between.

      Ken

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      • #4
        Forum member David Cofer posted a similar rig a few years back, but as I recall he used a weldment on the business end. I like the 2x4s better, quick and dirty for one time use. Good thinking.

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        • #5
          Thanks for the advise Ken, I did put a sheet up the other way first in the corner but figuring it in my head I would have to cut more sheets when I got to the end than if I put up the way I have the first one. It is a 25x36' (24x35' inside) garage. If I run the sheets perpendicular I would have to cut 4 sheets in half, if ran parrallel I would only have to cut 3 in half. Not a big difference but seamed the less cut pieces the better to me. What are the benefits and downfalls to each way?


          x39: I originally was going to go with welded iron but after not finding enough to do the job I went with wood and like you said it is only temporary and would be a waste of metal.
          Andy

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          • #6
            If you run across the joists the gyprock is supported along the seams at an interval of no more that the centre spacing of your joists (studs if it's a wall). But if you run them along the joists the seam probably won't be supported at all unless you cut the sheets to be the same width as your joist intervals. If the join isn't supported, even if well taped afterwards, it will probably crack and show the line some time later.

            Pete

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            • #7
              vpt,
              There are no benefits to running parallel, only negatives.
              Perpendicular, will offer a substantially stiffer ceiling.

              That's the way it is done and for good reason, even if it adds a bit of work.

              Staggering your end seams to the adjacent sheet is also a good idea.

              Ken

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              • #8
                This is a metal Meyers building. Originally the joists were spaced 6 feet apart, I added the cross sections so I could insulate the garage using 24" insulation. So all the lighter colored 2x4's are spaced 24" on center, the darker 2x8's (if I remember correctly) running the other way are 6' on center. So I am sure the 2x4's I added in for the insulation are helping with strengthening the garage but I don't think any more strengthening is really needed. Either way I put the drywall there will be at least one edge that doesn't have a solid from one end to the other 2x4 to screw into. I won't be taping and mudding at all, just cut and screw.
                Andy

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                • #9
                  I do appreciate any and all pointer and tips you guys give me and always take them into consideration. I just don't want to seem like I want to disagree with anyone and argue all the time (seems like I come across that way sometimes).
                  Andy

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                  • #10
                    Where I live (Clark county Nv) The sheets have to be run perpendicular with a minimum of 5 fasteners in 4 feet on the walls and 7 fasteners in 4 feet on the ceilings to meet code.
                    If a fastener tears the paper covering You cant count it.
                    Guaranteed not to rust, bust, collect dust, bend, chip, crack or peel

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                    • #11
                      This is where 12 foot sheets would be called for
                      Their real fun and not a one man task.

                      I think I understand, and if you are not going to be storing anything up there or walking it may well be just a judgment call then, especially since you have 4'8' sheets already and won't be taping.

                      Do you have to have the building inspected?

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                      • #12
                        Very Clever! I give props.

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                        • #13
                          vpt,
                          The reason I asked if the work has to be inspected is that if it does, all this talk is out the window, local rules apply.
                          I can tell you there is a thing called approved ceiling load, all this is engineered with specific limits.

                          5/8 on 6 foot joist centers may well fall out side those limits.

                          This kind of stuff always complicates a seemingly simple task doesn't it

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                          • #14
                            Even these little 4x8 sheets are heavy enough to work with. lol

                            No the building does not have to be inspected. I won't ever be storing anything above the ceiling and really doubt I will ever be up there for anything.

                            Thanks for help, I appreciate it!
                            Andy

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                            • #15
                              Nice apparatus VPT

                              that ain't workin - that's the way you do it...

                              I do agree with the others on how to run the rock and I might add stagger them like bricks it will add much strength but its your baby and I understand.

                              I made the mistake of not staggering when doing a little section at my bro's house and although it seems to be doing fine I hate making simple mistakes like that -- all the material was there but the fact is is I put it together wrong cuz I was fixated on other details and I hate that...

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