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cutting circles in 1" plate

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  • cutting circles in 1" plate

    Occasionally I need to cut a wheel or pulley from 1" plate. I usually center-drill and flame cut, then finish on the lathe.

    Is there a way to machine these without the flame cut portion?

  • #2
    Circle cutting

    Bandsaw, holesaw, trepan, rotary table or waterjet.

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    • #3
      If you have a huge shear (that can cut 1" plate) you can rough out your circle by a bunch of straight cuts. If you can solve the workholding problem, you can plunge mill using a rotary table. But by far the easiest/cheapest/fastest way is still what you're doing. You do have a good circle attachment, right? Those are worth their weight in gold. I love mine.

      And if oxyactetylene is the problem, try oxypropane or plasma.

      MM

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      • #4
        Wouldn't it be cheaper and faster to buy a cast iron pully the size you need?

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        • #5
          I use a disc-cutting attachment on my plasma cutter.

          Plasma will have no flame slag, but ~ 1/16" hardened kerf.
          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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          • #6
            I figured as much, I just get tired of the clean up.
            Pulleys mainly for cable and odd mechanisms so sheaves wouldn't work.
            I should just go buy some 5-6 in shaft for the bigger ones.
            Thanks

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            • #7
              Originally posted by gary350
              Wouldn't it be cheaper and faster to buy a cast iron pully the size you need?
              This is the Home Shop Machinist forum we don't DO off-the-shelf-solutions here.

              This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
              Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
              Plastic Operators Dot Com

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              • #8
                no one locally who can water cut them for you?

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                • #9
                  Its called a trepanning tool. Here's a link.
                  http://www.jtsmach.com/jtswebshop/Pr...Tools/D315.asp
                  Brian Rupnow

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                  • #10
                    Liger :

                    I'm not too sure we go around cutting slices off 6" bar, either !
                    Richard - SW London, UK, EU.

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                    • #11
                      Sure we do! Most modern hacksaws have a 12" blade.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by rohart
                        Liger :

                        I'm not too sure we go around cutting slices off 6" bar, either !

                        ***** (ffs... a thing that goes meow)

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                        • #13
                          Band-sawing from a round bar

                          Originally posted by Abner
                          I figured as much, I just get tired of the clean up.
                          Pulleys mainly for cable and odd mechanisms so sheaves wouldn't work.
                          I should just go buy some 5-6 in shaft for the bigger ones.
                          Thanks
                          I wouldn't do that.

                          At some time you are going to have an end left that you will find difficult to fit in your hack/band saw.

                          I just get it cut from round rod/bar by my steel supplier on his very big band-saw. Cost to cut is minimal and I am set to go on the lathe or mill with no hard spots to remove or cutters to be trashed and I don't have the inconvenience or expense of steel round bars sitting around "just in case".

                          I drive past my steel supplier 2>4 times a week - about 10Km (~ 6 miles) round trip. He can cut it dead true (for a band-saw) in a matter of minutes.

                          Its much easier facing off band-sawn faces and hot rolled than it is facing off a "black" face and a gas-cut edge on a disk cut from HR plate.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by oldtiffie
                            I wouldn't do that.

                            At some time you are going to have an end left that you will find difficult to fit in your hack/band saw.
                            .



                            stud into end, bolted to parallel box, c clamped to band saw. Piece of cake
                            .

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                            • #15
                              Adaption

                              Nice solution Mcgyver.

                              If I am caught like that I usually just tack-weld it to another bit that can be held in the bandsaw vise. Does not need a lot of tacks at all.

                              But on the other hand, if it needs to be cut from plate, I get my supplier to get it done at a local shop that does high pressure water-jet cutting. Its easy to machine and doesn't stress or distort or locally harden the part I want either. Most times non-important water-jet cut faces can be left "as is". My supplier gets it done at a better rate than I can and when he puts his margin on it I get it at a good price as well.

                              I made a conscious decision a long time ago to stop buying or hoarding steel plates and sections as the space it takes is a PITA as is pulling that bit I want out from the back of the stack/rack. I carry small quantities of steel sections and bar, and a bit of brass, bronze and aluminium, but otherwise I just go and buy it on an "as required" basis. Most stuff is available locally or if not its only a couple of days away by order.

                              I've wasted too many hours and too much stock "making do with what's around" and I plan my jobs around what stock my supplier has. He will cut to length for a small nominal charge as well and so the stuff is ready to use "as is" as soon as I get it home.

                              But, as you've shown in your band-saw adaption, you just have to improvise or make do sometimes - but its my last resort.

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