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D1-4 spindle, should chuck fit flush ?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by TR
    The manufacture says the chuck should fit flush against the spindle face. I have a 0.004" gap near number 1 jaw. No gap near the 2 and 3. Maybe I should use a breaker bar to try and tighten it just a bit ?
    this is not a problem brute force will solve

    presumably the pin 1 is engaging with the cam, ie like deere guy says, the pin is the right distance out so the cam catches it?

    Like I said earlier, that is your problem, its mounting like a swash plate. As earlier suggest you need to now determine if its the lathe spindle or chuck that is at fault - first thing is to try mounting any other tooling you have and check it with the feeler gauge....if everything else mounts ok dollars to donuts its the chuck
    .

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    • #32
      Originally posted by deere_x475guy
      TR, are all the pins on the back of the chuck screwed in the same length?
      yes, I even tried pins from my other chucks.

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      • #33
        Good news. I used a breaker bar to close the .004" gap and now have TIR less than 0.03mm. Pretty good. Pretty tight fit.
        I purchased some spare d1-4 cams just in case. The supplier told me they keep lots in stock because of demand. Typically machinists use a breaker bar to close gaps between the chuck and spindle face and sometime the cams break. Hard to believe.

        Thanks for all the good advice.

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        • #34
          Sounds like it's on the taper pretty tightly.

          Have you tried to remove it yet?

          Ian
          All of the gear, no idea...

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Ian B
            Sounds like it's on the taper pretty tightly.

            Have you tried to remove it yet?

            Ian
            Yes. The force I used on the breaker was not too big. It was just easier. Yes, tight fit. One whack of the rubber mallet and the chuck was loose.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by TR
              Yes. The force I used on the breaker was not too big. It was just easier. Yes, tight fit. One whack of the rubber mallet and the chuck was loose.
              One thing that I've found to help is that you make one pass just nipping the cams up, then a second pass tightening them to the final torque. Pulling the backplate in evenly helps a lot on the level of torque needed.

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              • #37
                I know this will probably sound like overkill to most of you and certainly way to slow for the production guys....
                I always....tighen mine just snugging by hand then I actually use a torque wrench and work my way around taking them to 50 ft lbs....Don't remember where I got that figure at...I know it was after I had shoulder surgery and was recovering.

                In addition to the above...when I do get a new chuck I always try all the positions and note the best runout..then make a mark on the chuck so I always index it to the mark I have on the spindle.
                Bob
                Pics of shop and some projects
                http://s2.photobucket.com/albums/y39...achine%20Shop/

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                • #38
                  FACT CHECK TIME

                  Having read all the posts, I decided to do a little leg work, and it was rather interesting. I had a machine shop Seminar at a tech college 60 miles way and they have a lot of lathes with DI Spindles. So I asked the instructor for a .001 piece of shim stock. He only had a .0015 so I used it on the 8 lathes.
                  I found that on 6 of them, I could not insert the shim, or see light.
                  On one, there was a .002 clearance and the other was cocked, at maybe .004".
                  Turns out the .002 would not snug tight, but was also not "registered".
                  That means the O--O marks between the chuck and the spindle were not alligned. You always mount a DI with these marks. When the instructor released the chuck and reset it with the marks, it came in to .000" , but he did put a heavy twist on the wrench.
                  The last chuck was....loose on one pin ...and also not alligned
                  But guess what ? Not all chucks AND not all spindles had registration marks !
                  (3 spindles and 2 chucks were void on this)
                  So maybe if your chuck is not pulled against the spindle sufficiently, you have a problem wirh the "connection"

                  Moral of the story is that attention on these issues are important to note and do occur and should be addressed. I know the instructor (friend of mine) is greatful that I brought up the subject,
                  It may have prevented damage or injury .

                  Thank You Home Shop Machinist for the opportunity to promote shop safety !
                  Thank You also to Mr Forrest Addy..your proof was in the pudding !

                  Merry Christmas all
                  Rich

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