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New Zealand steam locomotives

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  • New Zealand steam locomotives

    On the West Coast of the South Island in September, I stopped at Shantytown. I first saw this tourist attraction in 1972 when it was just getting started. I think it is declined since those early days, and overpriced. But I did enjoy looking in the locomotive shed of the bush railway they run on the property. It was lunch time and there was nobody else around.

    This may be the Climax #1203, one of three locomotives in service. http://www.shantytown.co.nz/Shantyto..._ID=9011_.html has some details about it.







    I know nothing about this locomotive, which is apparently being restored. Perhaps a switching engine, or a logging engine?


    Last edited by aostling; 12-17-2010, 01:20 AM.
    Allan Ostling

    Phoenix, Arizona

  • #2
    Allan, are you sure that is a locomotive not a traction engine? It does seem to have been registered for road use.

    [Later]

    Aha! I found this on the Shantytown site;;

    30 September 2002 - Traction Engine
    The Maori was the number one exhibit at the J & H McLaren 125th Anniversary Rally. The rally was held to mark the the first traction engine being built by the two brothers. This machine their number 1, left their Midland works on 20 March 1877. Of all the Mclarens built 65% of them were exported; Today New Zealand has the largest number of McLarens surviving than any other country in the world.
    So not only is it a traction engine it was the first Maclaren built! Well maybe as I find that paragraph a little ambiguous, maybe it is Mclaren traction engine #227.

    That was a very nice find Alan!
    Last edited by The Artful Bodger; 12-17-2010, 01:49 AM.

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    • #3
      John,

      A traction engine, of course. I guess what threw me was the name, The Maori sounding something like what you might call an express train.
      Allan Ostling

      Phoenix, Arizona

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      • #4
        Originally posted by aostling
        John,

        A traction engine, of course. I guess what threw me was the name, The Maori sounding something like what you might call an express train.
        Allan, the name was used on a long line of inter-island express steamers (Christchurch to Wellington).

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        • #5
          Originally posted by The Artful Bodger
          Allan, the name was used on a long line of inter-island express steamers (Christchurch to Wellington).
          It's good to see the nameplate, at least, live on.

          The fate of the Kingston Flyer is not optimistic (it is in receivership). That engine was a real delight, the first time I saw it steaming across the plain from Kingston to Lumsden back in the 1970s. But now the two engines on that tourist line sit unprotected in the yard at Kingston, deteriorating in the rains. The engine in the foreground was built in 1927 at the Hillside Workshops (Christchurch), according to the plaque on its side.

          Last edited by aostling; 12-17-2010, 02:18 AM.
          Allan Ostling

          Phoenix, Arizona

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          • #6
            Checked carjam.co.nz rego ML227

            Vehicle details
            Make: CUSTOMBUILT
            Model: J & H MCLAREN
            Year: 1904
            Main colour: Blue
            Vehicle type: Mobile Machine
            Body style: Mobile Machine
            CC rating: 700cc
            Fuel type: Other
            Country of origin: United Kingdom
            My neighbours diary says I have boundary issues

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            • #7
              Originally posted by aostling
              Allan, I understand the NZGR Ab Pacific class was the most sucessful of a range of locomotives built in NZ. They were widely used on passenger services and freight duties all over the country although heavier locomotives took over the heavier and longer distance runs early in the lifespan of the Abs.

              I used to go to school behind an Ab!

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              • #8
                From such humble beginnings (^^) to this?

                Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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                • #9
                  If the "Maori" is a Mac loweran, it's a mongrel. Someone has fitted a "Fowler of Leeds" coverplate to the steam chest.

                  Regards Ian.
                  You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

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                  • #10
                    Ian,

                    I am pretty sure that the traction engine is a McLaren with a very early cylinder. Remember that J&H McLaren were right next door to Fowlers, in Leeds. According to Ronald H. Clark (writing of the c.1876 single cylinder engines): "the distinctive semi-circular valve chest cover by which these early McLarens can be distinguished from quite an appreciable distance". I can't make out the name, but the cylinder looks very similar to an early McLaren in the book quoted.

                    Great to see this early engine! I wish I knew more about it.

                    The world's oldest known surviving McLaren (albeit not complete) does apparently reside in NZ (though it recently made a visit to the Dorset Steam Fair), but I am not sure if this is that engine. I don't think so.


                    Winchman,

                    There were and are plenty of McLaren traction engines and rollers in NZ...but they were made in Leeds, England. The remnants of this company closed in the 1960's. On the other hand, Bruce McLaren was a Kiwi who established his company in England, though it passed into other hands after his death. Same name, but not related as far as I know. (Apologies for stating the obvious if you already know this )

                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McLaren
                    Last edited by Peter S; 12-17-2010, 08:38 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Wrong McLaren, try this one .

                      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%26H_McLaren_%26_Co.
                      .

                      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                      • #12
                        Check out this video.

                        http://gsrj.com/steam-preview.html

                        Check out the 2 hour long TV show on NPT or buy the 2 hour DVD.

                        Rent a steam locomotive for a day in Ely Nevada.
                        Last edited by gary350; 12-17-2010, 11:13 AM.

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                        • #13
                          This blow-up shows the flyball governor on the McLaren traction engine. That should have been my clue that it is not a locomotive.




                          I just noticed I had this photo, which the Shantytown website http://www.shantytown.co.nz/Shantyto..._ID=9011_.html identifies as its Gertie L508. The photo of the cab in the OP was of this engine, not the Climax 1203 as I stated.


                          Last edited by aostling; 12-17-2010, 12:27 PM.
                          Allan Ostling

                          Phoenix, Arizona

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                          • #14
                            Yer spot on Peter S, now that Aostling has given us a bigger photo, it also qualifies Sir J's J.H Mc. On a further blow up, you can now read " & H McLaren"

                            Firm I worked for in the seventies had a satelite based in Sweet Street, could have been the original works.

                            Regards Ian
                            Last edited by Circlip; 12-17-2010, 12:41 PM.
                            You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

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                            • #15
                              Karori goldfields

                              Not too far off the subject, these two photos show the remains of a hoisting engine, almost within the city limits of Wellington. To get there I took a city bus to the end of the line, hitched a ride to the Karori Golf Course, then walked eastward over two steep ridges until I came to the ruins which I'd noticed on a topographical map. I was wearing heavy logging boots I'd bought three months earlier at the factory in Scappoose, Oregon, and I was glad to get barefooted in the warmth of the January (1972) sun. There was nobody else within miles -- I took these photos on the self-timer.

                              John, do you know if these artifacts are still on the site?




                              Allan Ostling

                              Phoenix, Arizona

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