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  • Swaging Out Square Tube..... Thoughts !

    Back in Sept. I posted some info on some 2 1/4" sq. telescopic tube I bought from a supply house that was not square. Anyway, they sent me a piece that was acceptable and I returned to the project. The 2 1/4" sq. tube fits perfectly over the 2" sq tube with just enought clearance as it should. How ever, after welding the gussets to the side of the 2 1/4" tube the 2" no longer fits inside. I had a feeling that welding to the 2 1/4" would play out this way as it always does. Looking at the pictures you can see where I started to file the inside of the tube where it's binding. I know I can get it to fit again by filing but thats really time consuming. So.......... the $50 question here is can I swage the tube out to open it up enough to fit again. My thought is to make a 2" square die, tolerance it a few thou over the measured size of the 2" tube that I have to go into it, radius the edges, polish it up a bit and with some oil press it through the 2 1/4" piece with hopes that it will expand it just enough to make it fit again. I know the die should be hardened to eliminate the chance of galling as it's pressed through but I'm just wondering aprox. how much over size I should make the die as compared to the OD of the 2" tube. I'de hate to fall short by a couple thou and have to make another die, and I still have to weld down the sides of the gusset wich will only add to the problem. Any one have any idea on what to expect here??

    JL.........................





  • #2
    I'm not a weldor (sp?): But how about some form of a "backing" inside
    the corner, or the whole peice, of 2 1/4 tubing while doing the job?
    ...lew...

    Comment


    • #3
      That would be a good job for one of those little air belt sanders, they only have a 10mm (3/8) wide belt.

      Dave

      Comment


      • #4
        Stand a steel triangular block up on your anvil, or the floor. Place your part over the block so the angled side faces the area you wish to push out and the vertical side is against the opposite wall. Take a piece of steel bar, say 1/2 x 1 inch and drive it into the wedge, forcing the deformed area out. This will concentrate the force in local area and push it out a little at a time. I would try about 15 degrees on the wedge angle.

        Comment


        • #5
          JoeLee, how about making 2 tapered wedges that look like adjustable parallels that are narrower than the tubing. Then you can press on one of them to push the sides out, and depending on how much you press, the size is adjustable. This way you don't have to guess what size to make the die.
          Jonathan P.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by japcas
            JoeLee, how about making 2 tapered wedges that look like adjustable parallels that are narrower than the tubing. Then you can press on one of them to push the sides out, and depending on how much you press, the size is adjustable. This way you don't have to guess what size to make the die.
            Thats a good idea, however you'll only be pressing on two sides which may result in concaving the other two.

            JL.................

            Comment


            • #7
              Your idea of making a mandrel a few thou bigger than the inside tube is ok. Just force it in with a press using some antisieze compound then using a hammer lightly tap it all over until the mandrel moves freely. Use planishing type blows all over and it will form to the propper square. It's a good job they are short otherwise it would be a major pain. Peter
              The difficult done right away. the impossible takes a little time.

              Comment


              • #8
                Make a block that slides in the tube.

                Push it tight in the troubled section and start hammering the weld on that side. There it is shrunk(?), hammering will lengthen it.

                Don't start with a sledge hammer and support the workpiece.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Grind down the tube thats supposed to fit into the deformed tube..
                  Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    In stitches

                    Originally posted by JoeLee
                    Back in Sept. I posted some info on some 2 1/4" sq. telescopic tube I bought from a supply house that was not square. Anyway, they sent me a piece that was acceptable and I returned to the project. The 2 1/4" sq. tube fits perfectly over the 2" sq tube with just enought clearance as it should. How ever, after welding the gussets to the side of the 2 1/4" tube the 2" no longer fits inside. I had a feeling that welding to the 2 1/4" would play out this way as it always does. Looking at the pictures you can see where I started to file the inside of the tube where it's binding. I know I can get it to fit again by filing but thats really time consuming. So.......... the $50 question here is can I swage the tube out to open it up enough to fit again. My thought is to make a 2" square die, tolerance it a few thou over the measured size of the 2" tube that I have to go into it, radius the edges, polish it up a bit and with some oil press it through the 2 1/4" piece with hopes that it will expand it just enough to make it fit again. I know the die should be hardened to eliminate the chance of galling as it's pressed through but I'm just wondering aprox. how much over size I should make the die as compared to the OD of the 2" tube. I'de hate to fall short by a couple thou and have to make another die, and I still have to weld down the sides of the gusset wich will only add to the problem. Any one have any idea on what to expect here??

                    JL.........................




                    Joe.

                    I'd suggest that you really do need to go over your welding procedures and sequencing.

                    There is or seems to be a lot more welding than seems to be required from a structural aspect.

                    "Fit-up" as well as sequencing, tack welding and small "hit and miss" and "stitch" welding and clamping and fixtues can help a lot.

                    The more you can reduce or control the "pull" (ie distortion) from cooling welds the better. If you cannot eliminate it then plan for it.

                    If you are MIG welding try a few 3mm (1/8") tacks and "stitches".

                    Fill in between the tacks/stiches if you must but it that extra work and welding is not needed why do it?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Might be a good job for a die filer.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Or just a file.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          To answer the question in the opening post...

                          I suggest making a die that is about the same size as what you want to slide through.

                          Drill a hole in the die and tap it with a tapered tap (yeah, kludge I know) then put cross cuts in the die so that you can expand the die by screwing in a bolt.

                          With that you will be able to stretch the steel in stages and sneak up on the perfect fit!

                          IMHO of course!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Had a job about 2 weeks ago very similar to that. Same thing happened. started sanding and filing out a few of the parts . Way to time consuming.Found out i could tap around on the part with a copper block and all would be well with the would. Kind of a stress re-leave Try tapping around with a piece of alum bar are a copper are brass block.
                            Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
                            http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
                            http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Again

                              I've previously posted this "angle plate" that I made for new castors on my shop engine hoist.

                              I was a very fussy about my set-up, tacking, stitching and "fill-in" welds.

                              It came out very well when checked against a good square - flat and true.

                              All it would have needed for good work on the mills or grinders was a fairly mild "lick" on either the mill or grinder.



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