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Can anyone identify this machine?

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  • Can anyone identify this machine?

    While in the process of getting some junk out of the basement of a house across the street, i came across this item. Can anyone advise what it could be used for and maybe who made it.
    thanks



    Last edited by Joe From NY; 12-17-2010, 07:47 PM.

  • #2
    It looks like a truing jig. You would put a bar between centers and use and indicator to check how it runs. You could use it for balancing as well.

    KEJR

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    • #3
      It's a "bench center". Like mount a workpiece between centers and measure it for taper, roundness, etc.

      That one is ancient, maybe turn of the century Brown & Sharp.
      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

      Comment


      • #4
        Hi,

        Looks like an old bench center. Used for inspection of shafts and such. You would place the parts between the centers and then you could easily measure things like out-of-roundness and diameters. They could also be used for what ever else a person could think up.

        dalee
        If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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        • #5
          It is a set of bench centers For checking parts between center.
          Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
          http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
          http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

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          • #6
            Pretty much what KEJR and Lazlo said.

            Also used to straighten shafts that come out of heat treat prior to grinding.

            I am not quite sure how it is done as we farmed it out but shafts would come back quite straight and have a spot or two that looked like they had been hit by a torch flame. That way we wouldn't grind through the case hardening.

            By the way, Joe.
            Looks like you scored in the tool bit department too. Lots of special ground tool bits that will save you lots of hours on a bench or pedestal grinder.

            And with a little care, all that carbide tooling will last you for a long time.

            The collet closer is also a very handy feature. If you don't get a set of collets with it, you will want to get a set. Very handy.

            Brian
            OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

            THINK HARDER

            BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

            MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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            • #7
              Send me a PM if you need help cleaning that kind of basements.

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              • #8
                If you clean it up a bit, it would be a very desirable item for someone who works on old Harley engines. It would be used for truing flywheels.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by x39
                  If you clean it up a bit, it would be a very desirable item for someone who works on old Harley engines. It would be used for truing flywheels.
                  Why on earth would anyone true up a Harley flywheel?
                  Makes 'em sound more like a Honda.
                  Mike

                  My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MotorradMike
                    Why on earth would anyone true up a Harley flywheel?
                    Makes 'em sound more like a Honda.
                    So you're saying Hondas run like out of tune Harleys?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MotorradMike
                      Why on earth would anyone true up a Harley flywheel?
                      Makes 'em sound more like a Honda.
                      And who knows what it would do the the reliability!

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                      • #12
                        I know it as a "Bench Steady" from the shops I have been in. It is used for checking concentricity or truing between centers.
                        K Liv

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                        • #13
                          It could be a bench centers, as others have stated, but it's possibly the swivel top from a tool and cutter grinder's table. The nuts in the corners could be the T bolts for clamping in the T slots. Also bench centers, at least the ones I've seen, have a much thicker base.
                          Harry

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by x39
                            So you're saying Hondas run like out of tune Harleys?
                            Um, no.

                            I think you know what I'm saying.
                            HD has a design philosophy with which I do not agree. If you ride one, I'm OK with that as long as you acknowledge the limitations and don't attempt to misrepresent the machine as something it is not.
                            Mike

                            My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by beckley23
                              It could be a bench centers, as others have stated, but it's possibly the swivel top from a tool and cutter grinder's table. The nuts in the corners could be the T bolts for clamping in the T slots. Also bench centers, at least the ones I've seen, have a much thicker base.
                              Harry
                              That's what I was thinking.

                              One end has a spring lever for retracting the center enough to remove the part. That's usually on grinder centers, but could be on bench centers also, of course.
                              1601

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

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