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  • Issues with a new item. Advise ?

    I recently bought a new tool. It arrived with problems. After going back and forth with the vendor he finally admitted this item had a history of issues and agreed to send me new parts. I inquired what the vendor would do to compensate me for time and trouble to fix this. His reply was, fixing it would make me understand the item better than the typical buyer. It took 10 days for him to pull parts from another machine and ship it to me. I now have 4 hours into cleaning the packing out of the replacement from a poor packaging job and swapping damaged parts for good. I would return the whole mess but it requires truck freight and a trip to Des Moines.
    I feel I deserve some compensation for having to repair a new tool that was over $650.
    thoughts ?

  • #2
    I would use the machine to make money, but not that way.

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    • #3
      This is a hobby not a business.

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      • #4
        He's taking the pi$$, send a recorded delivery letter giving him 14 days to either supply you (at his expense) a fully functioning tool or a complete refund, otherwise you will take him to court & apply for costs & compensation as well. Check with your citizens advice bureau for the correct form of wording for your local court system. If he tries to default - a winding up order works wonders.

        If you bought a new car would you assemble the transmission from a bag of bits ?? so why would you fix his machine.

        BTW What is it ???

        Good luck

        john
        John

        I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

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        • #5
          ...history of problems...
          Is that the item in general (model, type etc.) or that particular item (the one you bought)?

          In the case of the latter, to me, it was not new, otherwise how did it have a history and if not new you did not get what you paid for and should have sent it back when you found out this history.

          The former is a bit closer to a "lemon" so I am not sure what there...other than buyer beware.

          What I don't get is this idea of trying to work some sort of "deal" after the fact that certainly helps the supplier but does little except frustrate you. I certainly don't know law but would almost expect that some if not all of the return shipping to the supplier would need to be covered by that supplier. I get a mutually agreeable solution but I can not see anything "good" happening from this path.
          I hear about this from time to time with smaller items (its not worth anyone's time, money or effort to ship something back for refund or replacement, and the supplier just sends out a replacement) but, to me anyway, $650 is not small.


          Hope this does not sound too harsh but this is the second time in about a month someone has seemingly worked a good deal based on some flaw in equipment, and I get that, but like I said last time, if you agree to a discount based on some short coming of the original package (items missing, broken, wrong) I am not sure someone has any recourse if the "deal" turns against them. If I make a mistake, and I've made more than may share, you live with it.

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          • #6
            New mini mill with a messed up spindle. Vendor admitted in email that he has had trouble with this issue on other mills he sold. I knew what I was getting into with a mini mill but this is unusable. And to wait 10 days for parts is inexcusable. I have not worked any deal. I was offered $10 off my next purchase with said vendor. I can't believe the vendors solution was " here are parts, deal with it"
            Last edited by Bmyers; 12-23-2010, 09:11 PM.

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            • #7
              In all fairness you should have just returned the whole thing in the first place. By agreeing to fix it, you agreed to spend the time to do it at your own exspense, unless arraigments were made ahead of time.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Rustybolt
                In all fairness you should have just returned the whole thing in the first place. By agreeing to fix it, you agreed to spend the time to do it at your own exspense, unless arraigments were made ahead of time.
                Yes, I have been thinking the same thing... I guess I was hoping to get the same customer service that I would provide.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bmyers
                  New mini mill with a messed up spindle. Vendor admitted in email that he has had trouble with this issue on other mills he sold. I knew what I was getting into with a mini mill but this is unusable. And to wait 10 days for parts is inexcusable. I have not worked any deal. I was offered $10 off my next purchase with said vendor. I can't believe the vendors solution was " here are parts, deal with it"
                  :::raises hand::::

                  Was it the R-8 dowel pin being too long on a G------y mini mill? I called them and told them about that 3 years ago when I bought mine. I read about it a year and a half prior on mini-lathe.com....I got the same response from the vendor. I fixed it myself.

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                  • #10
                    i would have shoved he tools up his A** you dont screw a customer and get off scott free,you bend over backwards to make the customer happy, or you lose your business ,,plain and simple, in this hobby/business you will get what you pay for 99% of the time, buy cheap expect junk, but either way the dealer should be the one sending a tech with the parts or offer you a no hassel refund and come good for all shipping charges as well, i cant stand crooked dealers, car dealers are the worse of the whole lot..

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                    • #11
                      I assume the mill was made in China, or Taiwan . It's often said that Asian machine tools, as delivered, are just usable castings, and if you want a nice machine you have to take it apart and go through it piece by piece. It may be that for the price, that's all you can expect. The internet is full of step by step documentations of the rebuilding of brand new Asian machines. Agreed, it's a poor way to do business, but that's the way the home machinist tool industry is . You do, however, have every right to expect that the seller will at least supply you with replacement parts as needed. While you've got your machine apart, you can clean out the casting sand, shim whatever needs it, adjust everything as necessary, and make your own modifications. When all that is done, a lot of people are happy with their Asian machines.

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                      • #12
                        Actual problem was the spindle was not bored deep enough, R8 collets would bottom out before ever pulling into the taper. I knew buying the machine I would eventually need to tweak it, but I'll be damned if I will rebore a spindle. And before anyone asks, I checked that the collets were in spec.
                        Last edited by Bmyers; 12-23-2010, 11:39 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lbhsbz
                          :::raises hand::::

                          Was it the R-8 dowel pin being too long on a G------y mini mill? I called them and told them about that 3 years ago when I bought mine. I read about it a year and a half prior on mini-lathe.com....I got the same response from the vendor. I fixed it myself.
                          Wasn't Grizzly. It is a little machine shop in California.

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                          • #14
                            Credit Card

                            Did you buy this with a credit card? If so I wouldn't touch it cause then your responsible for that mess. I'd simply dispute the charge as received a non-functional unit. Let the seller deal with the aftermath.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Bmyers
                              Little Machine Shop in California.
                              OK. Now I know that I'll never deal with The Little Machine Shop. Thank you.

                              As for your problem, I'd follow Wilhelm's advice. Speak to your card rep. and find out if you

                              1. have to return the item in order to reverse the charge (vs. let the seller worry about getting the junk back)

                              2. have a right to request a prepaid pickup label from the dealer rather than paying for return shipping (if you're required to take care of return)

                              Good luck! What a bunch of scumbags!
                              Mike
                              WI/IL border, USA

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