Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What if I do this

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What if I do this

    So if I heat up some steel to red hot with a torch and then put in 30W oil what well happen, does it get hard Brett

  • #2
    Only if it is oil harden tool steel.

    Comment


    • #3
      Brett, depends on the steel. long and short, there are steels that will / can be hardened in a fashion similar to what you describe, and there are those that cannot. I'm not gonna make any assumptions on what you have. drop some details on what you have and people here can give a better answer.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Brett Hurt
        So if I heat up some steel to red hot with a torch and then put in 30W oil what well happen, does it get hard Brett
        Open a window first

        Steve

        Comment


        • #5
          my what if more info

          I have some mild steel do no know the number but machines very easily. So what I have done is make a holder that lets me screw in the screws Iam making so I can slot them, Iam doing a lot of them. And I thought that if I make a holder want it to last a long time make it hard. I would post a picture but Iam not good at that.

          Comment


          • #6
            The odds of getting any benefit from heat treating a unknown mild steel are not in Your favor.
            See if You can pick up some O1 or drill rod if You want a harden-able fixture.

            Steve

            Comment


            • #7
              It won't be the same after as it was before. Test it before and test it after to see what changed. It may be what you need or it may not. You will learn something, though, and can share it here.

              Comment


              • #8
                Hardening tends to warp things like threads.. Your generaly better off leaving it soft unless you are truely mass producing something. (Day in, day out, weeks on end)
                Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Brett Hurt
                  ...I thought that if I make a holder and want it to last a long time make it hard...
                  Perhaps what you are seeking is not hardness, but toughness. As others have said, it may not be a good idea to harden threads in your fixture, hence if you do go the hardening route, perhaps case harden (with the holes blocked).

                  If you want something that is tough (and can be hardened if necessary), a large grade 10.8 or 12.9 bolt or capscrew (sorry, don't know the US equivalent grade - better than grade 5 or 8 anyway) provides a good starting point.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Brett, more than likely the steel your using won't harden via the method you describe. a great choice for doing what you describe is 1144, or stressproof steel. heat it until red and hold it there for 15-30 seconds (I'm assuming it's not a huge item) then quench it in an oil / water mix 25/75% respectively. 1144 hardens easily. It's also wonderful stuff to machine. O1 is good stuff but more touchy and harder to machine. once it's hard go back and temper it, slowly and as evenly as possible heat it until it starts to go straw - purple colored. once you have it to that color quench it again and yer good to go.

                    *heat till red* = evenly until it's a bright cherry red in low light, you can also nicely judge by using a magnet and holding the heat when the steel loses it's magnetism. just touch the magnet to the steel and then get the mag away from the heat quickly. Mag's don't seem to like alot of heat.
                    Last edited by Walter; 12-25-2010, 03:54 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      To amplify a bit on what Walter said:

                      "Red hot" is really more like "carrot orange." When it's hot enough, corners and edges will visually lose their sharpness, but the best way to tell is with a magnet.

                      #30 oil may be a bit heavy for your purposes, you probably want something a bit lighter weight.

                      If the steel is water-hardening, for best results boil the water first, to drive out dissolved air, then let it cool before using.
                      ----------
                      Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
                      Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
                      Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
                      There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
                      Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
                      Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by djc
                        grade 10.8 or 12.9 bolt or capscrew (sorry, don't know the US equivalent grade - better than grade 5 or 8 anyway) provides a good starting point.
                        Grade 10.8 is roughly the same as SAE grade 8 and 12.9 is close to grade 9, although there is not an official grade 9 bolt..... but people make them.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If its ordinary 1018-1020 mild steel, nothing much will happen except it will turn a nice uniform black colour. If its material sold as "drill rod" or "silver steel" it will harden to a much harder state and become very brittle.
                          Brian Rupnow

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Walter
                            Brett, then quench it in an oil / water mix 25/75% respectively.
                            .
                            That sounds like the hard part. How do you "mix" oil and water?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If its a low carbon steel you'll just color it, if it is a higher carbon steel, whether air or oil hardening, it will make it hard if you get it to the critical temp(use the mag trick, easier than color in my opinion). When it is at the critical temp, plunge it(straight and or evenly as possible to prevent warpage) into the oil and swirl it in a figure eight for about a minute. After that wipe off the oil and immediately toss it in the oven at around 425 for two hours.

                              You can figure out if it is a high or low carbon steel by doing a spark test(google it).

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X