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  • #31
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    It is not really special to Benchmaster, it would work for other round ram machines, if the gear size is made suitable for the ram size. So it might have a wide enough appeal.
    Lovely job! I have an ancient horizontal mill with a Bridgeport M head on the round overarm, it really could use this! Trouble is, I'd need arms like a gorilla to reach it. The best idea I've come up with is to fit a vertical bar to the underside of the head adapter and fix a channel to the front of the machine, the bar sits in the channel and opposed set screws allow fine adjustment. Not very useful if I need the set the head at an angle though. Dave

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    • #32
      Dave-
      If you have a flat spot on the vertical bar you can set angles with a Bevel Box. It's a digital clinometer with a mag base that will stick to a steel bar. Just put it on the bar and zero it before you move the bar. You can then easily set to 1/10 of an angle.
      http://www.ebay.com/itm/PITTSBURGH-D...0AAOSwu4BVyAwt
      Kansas City area

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      • #33
        Already rounded it and painted it. Here it is, and it does almost look factory.... except it only has one chip in the paint, and no dings or gouges in anything. NONE of the paint on the machine is actually factory paint, as far as I know, so the gray is no worse than the various other grays. The belt cover has an ugly green paint that is probably factory, I may just leave that. I am not running a beauty contest.

        CNC machines only go through the motions

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        • #34
          On the front support there is a hole on the side, about ط 1/4". There should also be a hole on the support shaft. This is to align the head vertical. I found a pin that has a nice snug fit, and when I check the tram left to right it is within .001" for the length of the table. From your pictures it looks like you also have the hole in the front support.

          The problem that I have with my mill is that it is off about .005" front to back and I am not sure how to fix that...

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Douglas527 View Post
            On the front support there is a hole on the side, about ط 1/4". There should also be a hole on the support shaft. This is to align the head vertical. I found a pin that has a nice snug fit, and when I check the tram left to right it is within .001" for the length of the table. From your pictures it looks like you also have the hole in the front support.

            The problem that I have with my mill is that it is off about .005" front to back and I am not sure how to fix that...
            The head and mill were not together, and the holes are not even close to alinement, being about a half hole out when head is in tram. Evidently those holes were drilled off-hand and not in any precise location.

            In your case, you could simply oversize the hole a bit, and make a new pin. I'd suggest tapering it, as that would make it fit better. A standard taper pin could be adapted, and a taper pin reamer would open out the hole to fit.
            CNC machines only go through the motions

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            • #36
              Contrary to what you said, I do like to read these restoration threads. I find that I can learn a lot from them. Keep up the good work.
              Paul A.
              SE Texas

              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
              You will find that it has discrete steps.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                Contrary to what you said, I do like to read these restoration threads.
                +1
                Excellent work and fascinating too
                If you benefit from the Dunning-Kruger Effect you may not even know it ;-)

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                • #38
                  I like reading threads like this 'cause they are interesting. And I'm re-working my Benchmaster also....

                  Pete
                  1973 SB 10K .
                  BenchMaster mill.

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                  • #39
                    Back on the Benchmaster project. It got in the way of a clean-up, and the only way to fix that seems to be to finish the project.

                    The next victim to be worked on is the "saddle" between the knee and table. It has been started on, but not finished. At least one of the non-critical machined surfaces seems to drag, and will need to be trimmed down by 20 thou or so. You ban sort of see the marks in the second picture.



                    Last edited by J Tiers; 02-25-2019, 12:28 AM.
                    CNC machines only go through the motions

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                    • #40
                      I went back to read some of the early comments in this thread and I saw one from you JT, to the effect that you preferred "frosting" to "flaking." What's the difference in the two? What's shown in the pictures immediately above?
                      Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                      • #41
                        I don't know the formal definitions, but... I have always understood "flaking" to be a pattern, such as the "Nike swoosh" crescents often seen (half moon flaking) often applied to ground surfaces for oil retention.

                        "Frosting" I have understood to be a pattern such as a checkerboard pattern, applied by the normal scraping process, making the last scraping pass take the form of the desired pattern.

                        What the last photo above shows is just the normal random marks of scraping, without any pattern applied or intended. In that particular case, it is preliminary rough scraping, using longer strokes for metal removal when working the surface down prior to finish scraping for flatness and alighnment. The "frosting" would be making that same appearance take the form of a pattern, such as one often sees in old machine tool catalogs, applied to the visible scraped surfaces of the machine. I understand that good scraping hands could do such things as making the company logo appear in the center of a scraped surface plate, while maintaining the flatness.

                        I have not really attempted to do either, although I have looked into ways to do the checkerboard "frosting". A "pull scraper" somewhat inherently makes the checkerboard, just due to the shape of the "edge" and the action of the scraper, but I have never tried that method of scraping. I concentrate on getting a good surface. Maybe someday.
                        Last edited by J Tiers; 02-25-2019, 11:35 AM.
                        CNC machines only go through the motions

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                        • #42
                          I have seen what I assumed to be frosting, since it appeared to have a similar pattern as you'd see early in the morning on a car or windshield shortly after frost started forming, but before a solid coating occurred.
                          In other words, the little striations appeared to go off in random directions, like a crystal.

                          I just wasn't sure if that's what is being referred to by the term 'frosting.'
                          Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by lynnl View Post
                            I have seen what I assumed to be frosting, since it appeared to have a similar pattern as you'd see early in the morning on a car or windshield shortly after frost started forming, but before a solid coating occurred.
                            In other words, the little striations appeared to go off in random directions, like a crystal.

                            I just wasn't sure if that's what is being referred to by the term 'frosting.'
                            Sounds like fairly normal scraping marks. Usually, as the surface is improved, the strokes get shorter, so you end up with short marks and maybe even small squares, with the light reflecting off them in different preferred directions. SO you get that random look.

                            The intentional "frosting" would be the same type marks, but organized into a regular pattern in general. The idea of "frosting" a scraped surface is less about oil and more decorative, as the basic scraping is good for oil retention. I suppose a ground surface could also be "frosted" for oil retention, but most seem to "flake" them, which retains the ground surface while adding the oil pockets.
                            CNC machines only go through the motions

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                              I don't know the formal definitions, but... I have always understood "flaking" to be a pattern, such as the "Nike swoosh" crescents often seen (half moon flaking) often applied to ground surfaces for oil retention.

                              "Frosting" I have understood to be a pattern such as a checkerboard pattern, applied by the normal scraping process, making the last scraping pass take the form of the desired pattern.
                              Not to nitpick semantics, but I've always understood it to be the opposite. Frosting is the "Nike swoosh", while flaking is the checkerboard pattern. This seems to be the consensus between Connelly (Machine Tool Reconditioning) and Fairfield: http://www.galleyrack.com/images/art...d-scraping.pdf

                              Edit to add:
                              I think most ground surfaces get the Nike swoosh because it can be easily and very quickly applied with a power scraper. To get that checkerboard pattern on a ground surface would require more work and probably isn't worth it. If you're hand scraping then, as you said, you can sort of incorporate the checkerboard pattern into the last few iterations of the scraping process so it doesn't really require any additional work.
                              Last edited by Fasttrack; 02-25-2019, 03:53 PM.

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                              • #45
                                I suspect that "flaking" and "frosting" have never been pinned down and usage may vary by region and country. They'd both be final treatments after geometry and bearing are established. I've always thought of flaking as in half-moon flaking for oil retention but it's not definitive. And the oil retention strokes might be distinguished from the crescent stroke that Moore was famous for that might have been both a technique and a decorative finish. That is, I've heard it said that the stroke should start in a lower spot, cut it's maximum just through the high spot and then continue and taper off. That's cutting for alignment and bearing. OTOH, I've seen photos of a Moore guy just methodically going over the whole surface to leave an extremely regular pattern. You can't tell me that all the high spots just happened to be that regular a matrix.

                                I doubt we'll ever get to the bottom of that question because there will always be an old hand from somewhere else that uses the alternate terminology.
                                .
                                "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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