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  • #76
    Love the build. Keep-em coming... JR

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    • #77
      The only other thing that got done, was that the "wireway cover" motor mount got degreased and painted. Painting at this time of year means getting the rattle can all mixed up by shaking, then stepping out into the below freezing temp, shooting the paint, and stepping back in to hang the part for paint curing. Not ideal, and some of the paint on one handle did wrinkle up a bit for some reason, but it does get the part painted.

      Well, I also had to take the motor off, so I started looking around for what I have in terms of motor starters. I do have a couple manual motor starters (switches with thermal) and a number of regular switches, push-button controls, contactors, etc. I might just use a light switch, some of the Leviton ones do carry a HP rating, if you go and look for it.
      CNC machines only go through the motions.

      Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
      Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
      Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
      I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
      Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

      Comment


      • #78
        Re-checked the various alignments, and confirmed that the knee and the Y-movement of the saddle are correct within tenths. It is the X movement of the table that is out a little bit despite quite a bit of checking before full assembly. Probably I will find that I did not finish something during a previous fit of work on the project. A good reason to start and finish a project in one continuous sequence.

        As it is a vertical mill, and the head does not have any means to "nod" (it can be tilted in the Z-X plane), I do not have to do anything for the moment. I just need to remember that precise work might not be appropriate to line up vs the column way surfaces.

        I still need to decide if I am leaving it on the cheapo stand for the moment, or moving it to the welded stand, and decide where the control switches go.
        CNC machines only go through the motions.

        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

        Comment


        • #79
          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

          As it is a vertical mill, and the head does not have any means to "nod" (it can be tilted in the Z-X plane), I do not have to do anything for the moment. I just need to remember that precise work might not be appropriate to line up vs the column way surfaces.
          .
          Years past I owned a Benchmaster. I found that Rudy Kouhoupt did a series on the vertical mill and it was a Bench master. One detail I remember from the video was that he used a small shim between the casting and the ram that holds the head. This shim raised the ram a bit to bring the spindle into tram. Something to think about if you get to that point.

          lg
          no neat sig line

          near Salem OR

          Comment


          • #80
            Originally posted by larry_g View Post

            Years past I owned a Benchmaster. I found that Rudy Kouhoupt did a series on the vertical mill and it was a Bench master. One detail I remember from the video was that he used a small shim between the casting and the ram that holds the head. This shim raised the ram a bit to bring the spindle into tram. Something to think about if you get to that point.

            lg
            no neat sig line
            The front-back tram is OK. I checked that part out, and initially did the column and knee to set that up. (it was really bad initially) Scraping is how you fix that sort of issue. A shim, well, maybe, but not if you can help it.

            The clamps on mine would probably not have enough space for a shim anyhow.

            CNC machines only go through the motions.

            Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
            Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
            Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
            I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
            Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

            Comment


            • #81
              I measured everything 3 ways from Sunday today.... Got results that were not terribly consistent, and varied a bit with the method used.

              Rather than accept these results and take any action, I am going to let it be and use it for a while. If there is any "break in" craziness going on, that should show it up, and then I will decide what to do. Some of it I think was oil getting pressed out to a thinner film.
              CNC machines only go through the motions.

              Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
              Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
              Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
              I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
              Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

              Comment


              • #82
                So, having returned from being out of town for a bit, I got busy again, and put the finishing touches on the Benchmaster.

                It is now in condition to be used, although it could use a new belt. When I ran it today, pieces of belt flew off.......

                Here is the picture of it ready to go:



                It may get moved to a new base, I fully expect this one (as mentioned) to be entirely too noisy and obnoxious after I have used it for a while. It could also use it's own drawbar, it is using the one that the Lewis vertical head uses..
                CNC machines only go through the motions.

                Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                Comment


                • #83
                  Well, Having gotten to that point, I had a part that needed making, and what better to do than to fire up the Benchmaster and, for the first time, use it to make a part?

                  So I did. I located an MT2 3/8" collet, plus a 3/8" 2 flute center cutting end mill, and started on the pocket inside a cover I need to make. I did not even put the pulley cover on the head first. (mostly because it messes up visibility even more)



                  It went well, although the visibility under the head is horrible, and I really need to plumb air to wherever the mill ends up being put, because I had to go find a straw so I could blow chips out of the pocket without getting my nose into the pulley. It happily ate metal at 800 rpm.

                  I really DO need to put a cover of some sort over the area behind the table, it got lots of chips. And the front of the saddle needs wipers. But it worked, and even the stand was not too noisy despite my expectations. The crossfeed screw could use protection from chips also, what did not land on the front of the knee ways fell through the slot, with some landing on the screw.

                  I DO like the cranks. I did not think I would, but I see the big advantage is that the weight of the handle does not turn the screw if it is hanging free.... The handles on the Lewis are pretty much balanced, but they still turn due to vibration and gravity. Yes, the unused axis can be locked, but with a small pocket, you spend more time locking and unlocking than cutting.



                  Last edited by J Tiers; 02-02-2021, 03:43 AM.
                  CNC machines only go through the motions.

                  Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                  Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                  Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                  I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                  Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    Looks great!! Nice to see a machine WORK for the first time.
                    Robin

                    Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      Yes it is. Especially when it does work right!

                      I started on it a long time ago, and then it sat for a fairly long time while I did other things. Now, of course, I need to fit it in the shop somewhere. And, as a machine capable of a pretty high speed on the spindle, around 2300 rpm, it appears, I expect it will throw chips even farther than it did for that cover.

                      The cover, by the way, was for it. The motor had no cover for the wiring box, and I had no flag-type crimper that would do the style needed to go on the terminals in the box, so I had to use straight spade connectors, which were too tall for the cover. Hence the recessed taller cover.

                      I went around the inside edge with a corner rounding cutter (which was not as nice as I wanted), and then hit the outside edges with the belt sander. That took care of the sharp edges effectively, if not perhaps elegantly. It will want painted someday......
                      CNC machines only go through the motions.

                      Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                      Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                      Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                      I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                      Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        So, I put the pulley cover on the machine.... WOW.... it's dark and a long way in under there. Really hard to see, even without the cover, but that cover just puts the cherry on top as far as being hard to see.

                        Here is the view from in front without the cover. Not super easy to mill up to a line, you can't even SEE the line, partly due to light, but mostly due to the low angle of sight you have. I found that out trying to put that recess in the part shown in a previous post. I have the end mill down about a quarter inch in a hole in the random piece of material I am using to represent work in these photos.




                        And here it is with the cover in place. Not really much different as far as sight-lines, but a lot different in being dark under there. Both photos used flash, and do not do justice to the darkness. The cover does prevent getting pulley marks on your forehead as you put your head close trying to see what you are doing.



                        Well, it is what it is, but I see that a different vertical head is something to look for.... would make use of the machine a lot easier. Here is a view of the entire machine with the cover. Another part that would benefit from some paint.... it looks ugly. OK it is on the list for some later date when I feel like dealing with paint. Too cold out now.



                        In this pic you can see how much bigger the cover is than the pulley, which is already large. The extra room is to allow changing the belt around on the pulley.





                        CNC machines only go through the motions.

                        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          And, about that part above. It is actually a part for the mill. Te motor came without a cover for the wiring box. It is so crowded in there that the line connection spade lugs need the "flag" type fast-on, which I have no crimper for. So I had to use straight terminals, which needed more room than a flat cover would allow. So the recessed cover, with the 0.4" recess depth, allows for reasonable wiring of the motor.

                          Here is the (unpainted, and un-polished) cover in-place, complete with the recessed area that clears the motor mount (not required with a thin cover).



                          CNC machines only go through the motions.

                          Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                          Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                          Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                          I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                          Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Having (finally) used this for some real work, I notice that it acts a bit bigger than it is.... with the heavy table, and heavy head assembly, it does not shake and chatter very much. You'd expect worse from a machine in the weight class (300 lb or so), but the way the weight is placed, it actually does rather well.
                            CNC machines only go through the motions.

                            Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                            Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                            Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                            I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                            Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              Nice work JT, bringing that machine back to life. Now you get to use it, that's great. Would you consider a link belt for it?
                              I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                              Comment


                              • #90
                                Originally posted by darryl View Post
                                .................... Would you consider a link belt for it?
                                Thanks.

                                Probably not, there is little reason for one. I tend to consider those for machines where replacing the belt is rather invasive and troublesome. For this, just remove three screws on the pulley cover, and the belt is out in the open. It is a 53" belt.
                                CNC machines only go through the motions.

                                Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                                Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                                Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                                I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                                Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                                Comment

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