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Preference: Taig lathe or mini-lathe?

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  • Guest's Avatar
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    [This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 03-08-2004).]

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  • Thrud
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    Dan
    I prefer my larger maximat 7 as it takes full sized lathe parts. That said, I wish it was much larger and two separate machines. A top of the line Prazi would be my first choice if I was hunting for a similar machine as you can buy them with ballscrews ready for cnc. Again, these machines are very expensive, and a good used bridgeport and a hardinge lathe could be found for the same price if you are patient and have the room. no room, go small.

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  • Guest's Avatar
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    Well, on my web page, you can see pics of wheels I made on my 7x14 chinese lathe. These are what I would call the max you can do on these lathes.
    http://home.comcast.net/~billh308

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    [This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 03-08-2004).]

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  • dvideo
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    My objective was to learn on the Taig. I learned a lot. Now, I want to beef it up & know how to do that. Could not do so on a HF model, but they look good....

    Depends on your objective I think... I play with the Taig on my kitchen table. Carry it around. Make odd things with it. Could not do that with a bigger unit - and that is a consideration.

    --Jerry

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    [This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 03-08-2004).]

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  • Thrud
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    Dan please check out this site http://www.cartertools.com/ This is Nick Carters Taig webpage. It should answer all your questions. The Taigs are well made machines. Their only fault (if you can call it that) is no factory threading ability. However many ingenious people have worked around this with add-ons such as the frog CNC and a mechanical system - see nicks pages. These are one of the very best lathes available for turning exotic wood pens on - I have seen Leonard Lee use one here in Edmonton at Lee Valley Tools. Nice little machines, cheap to set up for wood turning.

    After all, it is more the craftsman than the machine that determines the quality of the works outcome.


    [This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 12-19-2003).]

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    [This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 03-08-2004).]

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  • Guest's Avatar
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    The Taig is meant for small work and somewhat light duty, while the HF 7 x 10 may not be perfect but I have done a lot medium size work on it as well as small work.

    I know a watch maker who makes "wheels" on his Taig. Very fine work, even delicate.

    Jerry

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  • Mac1
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    I have a Taig and an old wornout 10 inch Atlas. I haven't used the Taig in 15 years.
    I believe the mini lathe would be a better deal, at least the one I looked at in the Harbor Freight store. It appeared to be capable of cutting threads and had a power feed. You can't cut threads with the Taig.

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  • pgmrdan
    started a topic Preference: Taig lathe or mini-lathe?

    Preference: Taig lathe or mini-lathe?

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    [This message has been edited by pgmrdan (edited 03-19-2004).]
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