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Making 3 groove pulley

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  • Making 3 groove pulley

    I want to swap the electric motor on my new to me Walker Turner table saw for something stronger.

    The original motor had a pulley with 3/4" bore and a keyway of course. I looked at motors available at local TSC and all the motors have diferrent shafts, typically 7/8".

    Now I am thinking to just make a new pulley. I would buy a chunk of cold rolled bar O.D. 3", sharpen a HSS bit the way I just found here and make one.

    The only thing I dont know how to make is the keyway. I believe in English it is called broaching - and of course, I dont have a broaching machine.

    Any tips/advices for the lathe part or how to make the keyway?

    Thank you.

  • #2
    You can use your lathe as a shaper, taking tiny cuts using the carrage for feed, and cross slide for DOC. (Lathe spindle off), Mount the shaper bit in a boring bar.
    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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    • #3
      You are right, I heard of that method for making shaft splines.

      Now I have a different idea. I will buy pulley with the right bore and turn what I need from it. That pulley is cast iron, will make it easy enough to turn too.

      Opinions, please?

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      • #4
        If I understand, you want to buy a 2 groove pulley and remachine it as a 3 groove, with the OD of the 3 groove being about the root diameter of the original 2 groove?

        Two other suggestions:

        1. Buy a 3 groove pulley of the right diameter.

        2. Use a 2 belt drive system, and replace the standard belts with more modern, higher grip, higher strength belts.

        Ian
        All of the gear, no idea...

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        • #5
          If it were me I would buy a pully the correct diameter and bore. Why work on day on something you can buy for $20.

          Surface area belt contact is what makes the belt grip if your having a slipping problem use a larger diameter pully.
          Last edited by gary350; 01-04-2011, 08:39 AM.

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          • #6
            I make pulleys all the time, - Usually make them out of Aluminum scrap
            the easiest way I have found is to follow this:

            http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sourc...w8H5sud5SQgj7A

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            • #7
              I got a used pulley for $5. It has 2 identical sheaves. I plan to bore the center out to fit my new motor and maybe turn one sheave down if I want Hi/Lo.
              Mike

              My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

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              • #8
                Originally posted by gary350
                If it were me I would buy a pully the correct diameter and bore. Why work on day on something you can buy for $20.

                Surface area belt contact is what makes the belt grip if your having a slipping problem use a larger diameter pully.

                I would definitely buy a pulley if only to save time and money. In fact I did when I recently added a third pulley to my old Craftsman drill press.

                I'm sure I could make one like the one I bought but I actually checked and just the material alone (5" round X 3" 6061) was almost the cost of the pulley. (Chicago Die Casting, 4 step pulley, $22.00 delivered)

                Just my opinion, however.

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                • #9
                  I would love to just buy a new pulley, but so far I was not able to find it. The belts are 11/32 wide and 5/16" thick - worn out maybe a bit but thats the best I can measure it.

                  I am open to all suggestions, that's why I am here

                  Thank you, gentlemen.
                  Last edited by Prokop; 01-04-2011, 01:46 PM.

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                  • #10
                    I could be wrong but I'd guess you have an 'A' size belt and may be looking for an odd sheave size.

                    I found belt info here.
                    Mike

                    My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

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                    • #11
                      If your belt is non-standard, then you'll be making a pulley, and you won't be able to replace the belt when it goes.

                      Find the nearest standard size of belt to what you have, and replace all the pulleys commercially to match the kind of belt you can source successfully.

                      I agree that using pulleys with double belts will give a much smoother drive.

                      There's plenty of scope for making your own pulleys, but make sure the belt size you use is easily obtainable. Pulley drives are not such a high precision system as to require non-standard sizes.

                      Non-standard sizes are designed into machines to save pennies in manufacture, and cause users grief.
                      Richard - SW London, UK, EU.

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                      • #12
                        While Ive not yet made a pulley from scratch i have modified a few. not terribly hard to do. just follow the instructions in the link lodcomm posted. its the same info i use. i got lucky and got one of those old tools in a box of e-bay stuff.too big for my lathe but i keep it around to impress the unknowing.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by rohart
                          If your belt is non-standard, then you'll be making a pulley, and you won't be able to replace the belt when it goes.
                          yeah but good belts on a multi belt drive might last another 40 years if in good shape...I had mine off recently on my lathe, its got a 4 belt set up, and after 40 years they look perfect ....bet they go another 40 so why spend all the money changing unless the belts look iffy?

                          'Duplex's advice in the link is good, cut each side, if the lathe is light. I've done them a side at a time with a form tool but if its a decent sized belt its a very wide cut and prone to chatter, the way in the link is foolproof
                          .

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Prokop
                            I would love to just buy a new pulley, but so far I was not able to find it. The belts are 11/32 wide and 5/16" thick - worn out maybe a bit but thats the best I can measure it.

                            I am open to all suggestions, that's why I am here

                            Thank you, gentlemen.
                            Sounds like you have a 3V wedge belt pulley.Pretty common,made to carry higher HP in a smaller package.Look at the 3VX coss section here-

                            http://www.maurey.com/prod_ihp.php

                            http://www.maurey.com/pdfs/QD_SHV_WEDGE_3V_GR_2004.pdf
                            I just need one more tool,just one!

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                            • #15
                              How about you just bore out and cut a new keyway in the pullies you already have?
                              James Kilroy

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