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Machined a part for my manure spreader

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  • Machined a part for my manure spreader

    Today I am spreading manure and my spreader breaks. It is only forty years old but it has some design flaws. Should last longer!

    The beater bar is driven by two belts and the tensioner arm is locked in place with a pressure bolt arrangement. The original was just a piece of steel flat bar 12mm thick 30mm wide bent in a U and welded on to the frame of the spreader.

    On one side of the U a hole was drilled and threaded to allow a bolt to thread in and press against a flat blade.

    So I cut off the old arrangement and machined a block of steel to replace the original.

    They must not have used a good primer and paint on this spreader because after only forty years it is very rusted! So the replacement I made I wanted to bolt in onto the frame.

    I started with a 100mm X 40mm X 500mm piece of bar stock. I cut off a piece 50mm wide so I had a piece 100mm x 40mm x 50mm.

    Cut a slot in one end. Drilled and tapped a 16mm hole for the pressure bolt.
    Drilled two 12mm holes for bolts to attach to frame of spreader.

    Then machined off some of the thickness for the attachment bolts. Probably would have been better to leave it full thickness but I didn't have the right bolts. So I stuck the chunk in my horizontal mill put in a 36mm diameter roughing mill and reduced the thickness 15mm. I took 2mm per pass.

    I spaced my holes for attaching so I could but my nuts side by side and weld them together so I would not need to try to get a wrench in the frame. I put the bolts in the piece and tightened the nuts down and then welded them to each other.

    bolted it one and finished my farmer duties in good shape.

    Tomorrow I will email the manufacturer and see if it is still under warranty!


    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  • #2
    The manufacturers will probably tell you that a muck spreader is the only thing they won't stand behind Great fix. Peter
    The difficult done right away. the impossible takes a little time.

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    • #3
      In the United States we use the terms “warranty”, “guarantee” and “stand behind”. Nobody wants to stand behind an manure spreader.

      I've been setting on that joke for more than 30 years. Thanks for the opportunity to use it.

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      • #4
        The spreader was made in Denmark. I have done quite a bit of work on it and getting parts is easy. It is not the most heavy duty spreader but for our needs it is good enough.

        That is funny about the warranty and standing behind their product! I wonder if they have heard of the phrase in Denmark? I will have to ask when I email to complain! I have talked to the factory in the past and they are really helpful. Their service men will tell me all the little tricks to repair certain things that are not obvious until you do it once.
        How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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        • #5
          put in a 36mm diameter roughing mill and reduced the thickness 15mm. I took 2mm per pass.
          That is not called "roughing". You'd get extra points if the part stays put in the vise.


          Nick

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          • #6
            OK, I used a roughing mill to reduce the thickness to roughly the dimension I needed. I was going to then put a normal end mill in and dress it up but I was running out of time so I left it "rough".

            So if it isn't called roughing what is it called?

            Why shouldn't it stay put in the vise?
            How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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            • #7
              you could have counterbored for the Allen screws instead of reducing the thickness. Just a thought, Peter
              The difficult done right away. the impossible takes a little time.

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              • #8
                So if it isn't called roughing what is it called?
                It is called roughing, because it quickly removes material in a rough way.
                Cut with full width of mill and depth of cut not less than the diameter.
                Now you know why I mentioned the vise.


                Nick

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                • #9
                  Great job, no sh*t!!!! best regards Fred

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                  • #10
                    Are you saying that I should have taken a 36mm depth of cut across the 40mm face? I don't think that would work! My mill is pretty rigid and has lots of power but not enough for that much of a cut!
                    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                    • #11
                      Counterboring would have been a better solution I think. The part would have been stronger. BUT I like to watch the roughing mill rough!
                      How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                      • #12
                        Are you saying that I should have taken a 36mm depth of cut across the 40mm face? I don't think that would work!
                        Try it with a smaller one. Even on my weak FP1 I can use a 20 mm rougher with a DOC of 20 mm. Cutting full width, not just side milling 2 mm.
                        You'll be astonished how smooth that cuts (if it is a good rougher). But you need coolant. Also, they need feed, not too slow (but remember any parting off-experiences)!

                        If the 1 HP of my Deckel is enough for 400 mm^2, 4kW should be enough for the about 1600 mm^2.

                        You might try it with less DOC to find the limits ...


                        Nick

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                        • #13
                          Around here, manure spreaders don't last too long. The manure is very corrosive and rots them out.

                          If you have sweeter manure over there then good job, otherwise, you'll be having trouble with something else falling off next week.
                          Mike

                          My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

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                          • #14
                            I had the mill taking material off across the entire face each pass. So I was taking 40mm wide 2mm deep each pass. I think I don't get what you mean Nick!

                            I was using coolant. My mill has 5.5kw.
                            How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              So I was taking 40mm wide 2mm deep each pass.
                              Ah, that was the finish cut! But why did you use a rougher for it?


                              Nick

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