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Accuracy of new tire gauge - ???

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  • Accuracy of new tire gauge - ???

    I received a new tire gauge in the mail. It reads 35 psi when my old tire gauge reads 30 psi so obviously one is wrong and I suspect the new one is wrong.

    What's the best way to tell how accurate the new gauge is?

    I can compare it against the gauge on my air pig but they could both be off.

    What's the best procedure to tell just how accurate a tire gauge is?

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Take the average of all three, and make an adjustment factor for your new one.

    Comment


    • #3
      I have found the same thing with my tire gages.

      I have been told that the ones with a dial gage are more accurate. (by someone who had just bought one)

      I think it is more important that all the tires are equal in pressure than if they are a couple pounds off.

      Brian
      OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

      THINK HARDER

      BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

      MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

      Comment


      • #4
        Well, a mercury manometer would be accurate enough to measure actual pressure without having an unrealistic column.

        If you can find a laboratory grade pressure gauge you could use that.
        It's only ink and paper

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        • #5
          If the gauges both go to 100 psi.....


          .....and the calibration allows for plus/minus 3%


          ...then they may both be correct





          .
          "...do you not think you have enough machines?"

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          • #6
            In the example I gave the old gauge reads 30 psi and the new gauge reads 35 psi. Much more than 3%.

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            • #7
              Same dilemma as the man with two watches.

              Throw one of them away!
              Or maybe hide it away until such time as the "use" one get lost.
              Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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              • #8
                What about the digital gauges? I never did trust those sliding gauges.

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                • #9
                  me too

                  I had that same discussion with the national sales manager for a very well-known manufacturer of tire gagues and items yesterday. He was showing us a new US-made pencil gauge.
                  He didn't have a good answer either.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I had a pencil style gauge and gave it to my son. I have a Brookstone digital gauge that my other son gave me as a gift a while back. The new one has a large dial gauge that's easy to read and seems very nice.

                    I'll compare the new one against the digital gauge and the gauge on the air pig and see if any two come close to agreement.

                    There should be a better way.

                    Anyone know what 323 certification is? I called the manufacturer and he mentioned that the gauge I bought is supposed to be 323 certified.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I have probably a dozen tire gauges - pencil, dial, and digital.

                      I just don't see how a pencil gauge can be accurate. I'm amazed that they even repeat.

                      Digital gauges under $20 just all look cheap. However, i recent got a Dual-foot truck gauge from Slime that looks and feels like quality.

                      Right now the gauges I trust most are the dial gauges. I have settled on the Slime 20049, which is a 2" gauge, all brass, w/bleed-off valve, for under $10 retail. Supposedly the local paper tested tire gauges and found this to be the most accurate, though I have not been able to find the article.

                      As an aside, a couple years ago at the track, several of us decided to compare our tire gauges. These were the dial-type with hose, cost $30-$40 each. We rely on them as we adjust tire pressures by a pound or sometimes less between rounds. Among 5 of us, we found a 4-pound variance on the same tire, and each was repeatable.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by pgmrdan
                        I had a pencil style gauge and gave it to my son. I have a Brookstone digital gauge that my other son gave me as a gift a while back. The new one has a large dial gauge that's easy to read and seems very nice.

                        I'll compare the new one against the digital gauge and the gauge on the air pig and see if any two come close to agreement.

                        There should be a better way.

                        Anyone know what 323 certification is? I called the manufacturer and he mentioned that the gauge I bought is supposed to be 323 certified.
                        Guaranteed to fit a Mazda 323 tire?

                        Brian
                        OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                        THINK HARDER

                        BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                        MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Checking air gauges

                          I worked at the Buss Company in Dallas when I was in school. With a fleet of several hundred Busses they had two people that all they did was check and air tires. In the tire shop there was an air tank that had a 4" certified gauge that was used to check the working tools. There were a lot of the busses that ran just for the peak use periods and would then return to the terminal for most of the day. The guys that checked tires would bump the tires with a pipe. They got to where they could look at the amount of rubber and bump a tire and tell if it was just a few lbs low. If it had just come in from a run they could feel the temperature of adjoining duals and tell also. They really worked at keeping the tires matched in size and inflation.
                          Byron Boucher
                          Burnet, TX

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by pgmrdan
                            I had a pencil style gauge and gave it to my son. I have a Brookstone digital gauge that my other son gave me as a gift a while back. The new one has a large dial gauge that's easy to read and seems very nice.

                            I'll compare the new one against the digital gauge and the gauge on the air pig and see if any two come close to agreement.

                            There should be a better way.

                            Anyone know what 323 certification is? I called the manufacturer and he mentioned that the gauge I bought is supposed to be 323 certified.
                            I believe that "323" refers to a gauge that has a full-scale accuracy of +/-3% at both ends of the scale and +/- 2% at center scale. On a 100psi gauge, an actual 50psi could read anywhere from 48-52psi.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Gravy
                              I believe that "323" refers to a gauge that has a full-scale accuracy of +/-3% at both ends of the scale and +/- 2% at center scale. On a 100psi gauge, an actual 50psi could read anywhere from 48-52psi.

                              Great! Thank you very much!

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