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The Replicator Inches Ever Closer

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  • The Replicator Inches Ever Closer

    3D printing with titanium.
    Titanium is by far the hardest and strongest 3D printing material. It is also extremely accurate and biocompatible. We are very curious to see which of the host of possible applications that are open to designers will be used by them We think that titanium 3D printing is a powerful production technology that really adds to a designer's arsenal.

  • #2
    'compyuta- cup of tea, earl grey, hot- in a titanium cup please'- Zing! 'there you are captain- I've put a boronitrisil foam coating on the handle so you don't burn yourself'. 'thank you comyputa'.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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    • #3
      Every home will have one in the near future...all people will have to do is buy material....
      Johnny needs a new bike....picks out the one he wants...pays a fee to the designer and downloads the plans....pop..a new bike from the "printer"
      No need for shipping fee, no waiting, (unless they are out of material), etc.
      LoL...? possible....who knows!!
      e2die
      please visit my webpage:
      http://motorworks88.webs.com/

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      • #4
        Originally posted by motorworks
        Every home will have one in the near future...all people will have to do is buy material....
        Johnny needs a new bike....picks out the one he wants...pays a fee to the designer and downloads the plans....pop..a new bike from the "printer"
        No need for shipping fee, no waiting, (unless they are out of material), etc.
        LoL...? possible....who knows!!
        e2die

        It is on it's way - we already have downloadable media - books, music, movies.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by gda
          It is on it's way - we already have downloadable media - books, music, movies.

          This will be the next "Big Thing"


          Radio

          TV

          Video-Game
          Personal Computer

          Networking
          Social Media

          ...
          Home manufacturing.
          This product has been determined by the state of California to cause permanent irreversible death. This statement may or may not be recognized as valid by all states.
          Heirs of an old war/that's what we've become Inheriting troubles I'm mentally numb
          Plastic Operators Dot Com

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          • #6
            Raises some interesting questions ...

            How would you control the printing of weapons and guns ???

            Will it be similar to our fabulous DVD encryption software or will it send and email to the ATF letting them know you just printed a gun ?

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            • #7
              Hi,

              I'm not sure if it will really be much different than it is now for firearms. They are incredibly easy to make with common everyday items even now.

              I do suppose if you wanted to download and "print" that new Poli SxS 20ga. shotgun, it would be a fairly simple matter make you fill out what ever forms are needed and to wait for a background check before downloading. Digital signature required for proper verification of course.

              dalee
              If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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              • #8
                Well not quite the same. Lots of people don't pay for music or software any more. Once it's digital anyone anywhere can get a copy legal or not.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tuckerfan
                  "Titanium is by far the hardest and strongest 3D printing material. It is also extremely accurate and biocompatible."
                  They're being more than a little creative with marketing. As our own George Bulliss mentioned here two years ago, EOS been able to print sintered titanium alloys and high-speed steel for awhile now, so you can "print" specialty cutting tools.

                  I posted a video 2 years ago of EOS 3D Printing a turbine fan.

                  The turbine blade is at 5:56. Surface finish is pretty lousy -- all the shiny, pretty parts have a subtitle that says that the parts were electropolished



                  Edit: looks like that company Tucker posted is serving as a broker for EOS 3D Printing services
                  Pricing

                  A Standard part 2 by 2 by 4cm with a volume of 1 cubic centimeter would be 93 Euros ($124).

                  A part with the same bounding box and 4 cubic centimeters of volume is 144 Euro ($192).
                  Last edited by lazlo; 01-22-2011, 11:41 AM.
                  "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                  • #10
                    I mentioned this very thing here about 4 years ago. The pioneering work was being done at MIT at the time.
                    The last I heard MIT was experimentung with 3D printing vitreous metals.
                    On one of the DIY sites there is a homemade 3D printer using epoxy as a medium.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by KiloBravo
                      Raises some interesting questions ...

                      How would you control the printing of weapons and guns ???

                      Will it be similar to our fabulous DVD encryption software or will it send and email to the ATF letting them know you just printed a gun ?
                      And how do you know that classic Mustang for sale is legit, or one that someone just printed out?


                      Originally posted by Rustybolt
                      I mentioned this very thing here about 4 years ago. The pioneering work was being done at MIT at the time.
                      The last I heard MIT was experimentung with 3D printing vitreous metals.
                      On one of the DIY sites there is a homemade 3D printer using epoxy as a medium.
                      Makerbot uses ABS plastic and sells for less than $1300 in kit form: http://www.makerbot.com/

                      Cornell University is working a food replicator: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-12069495

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by KiloBravo
                        How would you control the printing of weapons and guns ???
                        If you watch the video I posted, Direct Metal Laser Sintering (the process described in Tucker's link) is much more complicated than that: it slowly builds up a 3D construct of soft, fragile powdered metal, which must then be fired in a heat treat oven to sinter it. The resulting object is porous, so it doesn't have universal application.

                        We're at least a decade away from being able to sinter a handgun.

                        Besides, guys are milling handgun parts on their hobby mills right now, so how would an additive process be more malevolent than a subtractive process?
                        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                        • #13
                          Hey, maybe we can print a new gf?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by lakeside53
                            Hey, maybe we can print a new gf?
                            Weird Science! I want a copy of Kelly LeBrock. The 1985 Kelly, not what she looks like now
                            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by lazlo
                              We're at least a decade away from being able to sinter a handgun.

                              Besides, guys are milling handgun parts on their hobby mills right now, so how would an additive process be more malevolent than a subtractive process?
                              I liken it to the very few real hackers out there, and the very large number of "script kiddies" that hack using tools created by others who are more skilled.

                              In this instance there are only a handful of hobbyists (thousands???) that have the motivation and skills and tools to make their own reliable and accurate rapid fire guns. The advent of a 3d printer will bring the capability within the realm of anyone who can program a VCR and assemble a gun from parts.

                              That's were it gets sticky. You don't need to replicate the gun, just the parts that are not widely available such as auto-fire sears.

                              Personally, I do not see 3D printing as a bad thing. A bit over hyped, but not bad.

                              Dan
                              At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

                              Location: SF East Bay.

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