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'nother lathe trick

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  • 'nother lathe trick

    First a couple qualifiers. This is not my shop. This was in a shop next to where some supplies were purchased.
    The loader arms are off a +/- 1 1/2 yd payloader. The lathe is a +/- 24" x 144" of eastern european descent. The loader arms are being line bored with a boring bar between centers. Obviously a lashup. Brackets bolted to the carriage are tack welded to the loader arms. An obvious application for portable line boring, but....

    Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

  • #2
    Where there's a will, there's a way. need is the mother of invention.
    It's only ink and paper

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    • #3
      Thanks for posting that! I always like to see "outside the box" setups on big things like that because it provides inspiration for some goofy small stuff I get myself into doing repairs.
      Cheers,

      Frank Ford
      HomeShopTech

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      • #4
        Based on the size of his work do you think that is a slitting saw leaned up on the lathe!!!!
        Location: The Black Forest in Germany

        How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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        • #5
          If outside the box is what interests you, try this.


          Its a 24" dia x 5" wide impeller painstakingly crafted out of pipe and plate and welded up with a mig.

          Any other impeller I can recall seeing that size was cast iron, not a weldment.

          Cam
          Last edited by camdigger; 02-01-2011, 01:55 PM.
          Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Black Forest
            Based on the size of his work do you think that is a slitting saw leaned up on the lathe!!!!
            Yes it is,

            well it's actually a high speed cutoff blade, AKA friction saw (about 30" dia & goes @ 3000 rpm , you can get them 8 ft dia ) off a pendulum saw. Used for cutting tubes .



            See HERE

            john
            John

            I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

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            • #7
              That looks more like a big sprocket to me. It seems unlikely that a saw blade would have that big of a hole in the middle.
              Kansas City area

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              • #8
                I once had a workpiece which required a weld groove milled on the end. I bolted a pair of 2" square bar 6' long to the BP table for support. The work was bolted to them and a pair of lathe tool holders welded, crossed at 45 degrees, to give the groove the angle required was in the spindle. The set up was able to take a big bite of the work. The groove depth needed the table raised and a set over to get the groove to print. I always flinched when the tool entered the cut as the nature of the setup caused hammering of the tool, bearings, and work. The outcome of the groove was better than I would have bet on. The bearings of the BP spindle did get replaced after the job was done. The workpiece was a side plate for a Caterpiller loader and I don't remember the size, but the material was some thing like an inch n a half + in thickness. The work was taller than me when standing on groove end edge. I think I milled 10 or 12 pieces that way, left and right. I wish I had pictures of that setup. I wouldn't treat my mill that way, but ya do what the boss tells ya to do.
                Krutch


                Mentally confused and prone to wandering!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by camdigger
                  Its a 24" dia x 5" wide impeller painstakingly crafted out of pipe and plate and welded up with a mig.

                  Any other impeller I can recall seeing that size was cast iron, not a weldment.

                  Cam
                  Wow!

                  The bore has to be concentric and coaxial with the OD and the whole thing needs to be balanced.

                  Did it work or blow up the rest of the pump?
                  Mike

                  My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

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                  • #10




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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by camdigger
                      If outside the box is what interests you, try this.


                      Its a 24" dia x 5" wide impeller painstakingly crafted out of pipe and plate and welded up with a mig.

                      Any other impeller I can recall seeing that size was cast iron, not a weldment.

                      Cam
                      I think the volute for that impellor is on the floor in front of the lathe.
                      Jim H.

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                      • #12
                        Maybe that gear is the back gear for a Taig lathe

                        Turning large crankshafts looks interesting. I guess you'd want to 'stand clear' when the lobes come around. One of those would crush you like an empty paper bag, and the ammeter wouldn't even flicker.

                        At first glance, I thought that said Bridgeport on that grey Unimat there, with the two guys studying archimedes screw- I figured maybe Sir John might have owned that at one time
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                        • #13
                          There were no photos but I always remember a passage from a friends book on marine engineering: 'Be sure to remove all scaffolding from crankcase before starting engine'. I also remember there were photos showing the long hoses that carried cooling water to the pistons and oil to the wrist (gudgeon) pins. Don't remember the HP or RPM but I have personal experience with a Cooper Bessemer LSV-16 that produced over 5000 HP at 360 RPM.
                          Don Young

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JCHannum
                            I think the volute for that impellor is on the floor in front of the lathe.
                            It is possible, but the two images were out of two different shops across the street and around the corner from each other. I didn't mean to infer that they were from the same shop.

                            I have no idea how the impellor performed. Neither does the builder. That picture is less than a week old.
                            Design to 0.0001", measure to 1/32", cut with an axe, grind to fit

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                            • #15
                              Interesting, maybe the two shops should get together. Re reading the impellor post, I see it is larger than the volute. Either of the two pieces should work just fine, that type of pump is typically used for trash or sludge and usually runs at lower RPMs.
                              Jim H.

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