Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Thought on bending metal tubing...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Thought on bending metal tubing...

    Had a thought one could fill a metal tube with a low temp alloy like Cerro-safe to prevent getting a kink while hand bending. Anybody ever done this? Thoughts?

  • #2
    I have not used a low temp alloy, but I have used SALT. Plug one end, pour the tube full and plug the other end. You can then just brute force the tube around a pipe or similar round pattern. Of course, tube benders are easier.
    Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

    Comment


    • #3
      Use sand.

      Comment


      • #4
        Yeah, my Dad did some nice bending of aluminum tube by filling it with sand.

        John

        Comment


        • #5
          The problem with sand/salt is its granular and you're faced with having to contain the stuff. A low temp alloy would form a solid rod that could easily be melted out afterward.

          Comment


          • #6
            im pertty sure there are alloys designed for filling pipes for bending.. or at least, advertised for such.
            Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

            Comment


            • #7
              And salt/sand can pack tighter and allow flattening. The alloy is harder to flatten
              1601

              Keep eye on ball.
              Hashim Khan

              Comment


              • #8
                Cerrobend?
                North Central Arkansas

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have not used it myself but have seen it done successfully several times.
                  Apparently this is one of the primary uses of the alloy.

                  http://www.boltonmetalproducts.com/Home_Page.html

                  A quote from the applications page....


                  "Tube Bending: Bending of thin-walled tubing and channels without adequate support can wrinkle, flatten, or rupture the part wall. Bolton Alloy 158 and Bolton Alloy 255 have long been used to support work pieces during bending or formatting to prevent damage. Normally the part should be lubricated before filling to prevent galling and to allow for clean alloy removal. The growth property of the alloys ensures complete part filling, and flaws in a tube wall can often be detected by bulges or leaks of molten alloy through microscopic cracks.
                  Bolton Alloy 158 is the most widely used for this application, and it can be melted out with hot water. Bolton Alloy 255 is used for tubes with diameters larger than 1.5 in.; however, a hot oil bath or oven heating is required to reach the 255°F melting temperature.
                  With Bolton Alloy 255 the tube or channel can be bent as soon as the alloy solidifies. Bolton Alloy 158 must be rapidly cooled by immersion in cold, circulating water or other quick chilling medium immediately after filling. This results in a fine grain crystalline structure that adequately supports the work piece during formation."
                  Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                  Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                  Location: British Columbia

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Highpower
                    Use sand.

                    Yup, if you are using heat you have to use dried sand.
                    Andy

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Just be careful what sort of sand. I once filled a tube with sand, sealed it, bent it - worked pretty well. I then tried to get the sand out and discovered I'd used paving sand. It comes with binders in it that allow the sand to lock into the bricks, particularly if it gets wet. It also locks together when heated.

                      Michael

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        How about this one: I saw a fellow making a trombone on television and he filled brass tubing with soapy water and froze it; the narrator said the soap prevented the ice from shattering during the bend.
                        Cameron Watt: Welder, blacksmith, egotist.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Some great posts and info on this subject, thanks all!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I'll qualify my previous post by saying that maybe if you're bending a one foot by3/8" tube then the low melt stuff might be great...and probably not expensive.
                            The reference to what my Dad would do was more along the lines of 3/4" x 4' formed around a 55 gallon drum....that might be costly using the low-melt stuff

                            John

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              ZINOM, agreed, My interest would be more on the order of making fuel lines and such, definitely smaller stuff.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X