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  • Gasoline and the shop floor

    Hello everyone,
    I have a newer shop with a 1yr old concrete floor and a floor sealer (gasoline resistant) on it. My project car has some old gas in the tank and some leaked out over night. I have vented the shop,turned off the electric heater and cleaned up the spill but the floor (and shop) still smell of gas and the floor looks like it has some amount soaked in. Any ideas as to what I can do to remedy this problem it makes it hard to work in there.
    Any advice would GREATLY be appreciated and Thanks in advance.

    Chris
    Mr. Fixit for the family

  • #2
    Just wait the smell will go away in a few days.

    I spilled 5 gallons of gas on my shop floor. I was afraid all those fumes it would explode from turning on a light switch. I turned the main braker off outside. I left it off for 4 days. I had the drive in door open all day but after losing the door at night it smelled almost as bad the next morning. It took about a week for the smell to go away.

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    • #3
      Gasoline is hard to get rid of completely. I'm sure you've heard multiple stories of gasoline tanks that had been "thoroughly washed out" blowing up when somebody welded on them...and that's a non-porous steel tank. You've got more or less permeable concrete to deal with.

      I guess I would just keep venting the place (air blowing in, so the gasoline vapor doesn't get drawn through the fan motor, although the vapor concentration is most likely low enough so it's not a danger). Application of some Speedy-Dry, ground into the concrete with your foot where the spill was and left a day or so, might help. You could try washing the area with industrial-strength detergent and water. You've probably thought of most, if not all, of that. I wish I had some kind of brilliant idea, but I'm afraid I don't.
      ----------
      Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
      Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
      Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
      There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
      Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
      Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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      • #4
        Spill some Diesel on top,it'll make it smell better than rotten gasoline.

        All kidding aside I was told charcoal scrubbed into a floor will get rid of most foul odors.
        I just need one more tool,just one!

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        • #5
          My shop floor is high polished concrete and is sealed as well. If gas or oil sits on it long enough it will soak in and look like a stain. I usually spread some cement powder over the stain and leave it for a few days ocasionally rubbung it in with my foot. Most of the time it will pull the stain. I don't worry about stains too much as it's a shop floor !!! Machines leak a little and your bound to have a few spills, rust stains or drop some heavy block of steel and chip it as well.

          JL.......................

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          • #6
            Gasoline or kerosene or oil is not hard to get rid of. Spread some kerosene on the area where the gas is and then rub it in with a broom. It don't take very much. Then spread floor dry or kitty litter on it about 1/4" to 3/8" thick and leave it for a day or two. Then sweep it up and keep it because it is still good.

            I use the floor dry over several times until it starts to look discolored or refuses to soak up anything.
            It's only ink and paper

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            • #7
              The smell of gasoline is easier to get rid of than the smell of kerosene. Just keep ventilating the shop, and the smell will disappear. Gasoline is a mixture of light and heavier components with differing vapor pressures, and the light ends will first evaporate, making the most odor. The heavier ends take longer. If you want to speed up the process, use sawdust plus laundry detergent and water, and scrub it in, and wash it out. Repeat. The addition of baking soda to the sawdust may help. Do not use modern " clumping" cat litter and water. The litter makes a thick goo with water after a time that is difficult to remove.
              Last edited by Bill736; 02-09-2011, 12:35 AM.

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              • #8
                Laundry powder soap, specifically Tide is about the best thing I've ever found for cleaning out old gas tanks, and I've used it for the nasty bad gas stink that soaks into the garage floor when you spill it. Dump some powder down, throw in a little water, run it around with a broom for a bit and hose it out of the garage. It works.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Carld
                  Gasoline or kerosene or oil is not hard to get rid of. Spread some kerosene on the area where the gas is and then rub it in with a broom. It don't take very much. Then spread floor dry or kitty litter on it about 1/4" to 3/8" thick and leave it for a day or two. Then sweep it up and keep it because it is still good.

                  I use the floor dry over several times until it starts to look discolored or refuses to soak up anything.
                  Carl,

                  I'm glad to see that I am not the only one that re-uses oil dry.

                  One of my buddies saw me sweeping up and putting the oil dry into a 5 gallon bucket for re-use.

                  He told me that I was more Dutch than he ever knew.

                  I told him that I just don't believe in wasting things.

                  BTW, he always seems to be short of cash. If he has $, he spends it.

                  Nobody will ever accuse him of being cheap, just broke.

                  Brian
                  OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                  THINK HARDER

                  BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                  MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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                  • #10
                    Kitty litter then Mean green cleaner (simple green a the dollar store).

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                    • #11
                      Burn it out with a torch. The big propane ones work good for that.
                      Andy

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                      • #12
                        I have a grease barrel I keep the new floor dry in and a 5 gal bucket with a coffee can in it for the used floor dry. It really will last a long time and it's easy to tell when it quits soaking up stuff.

                        Waste not, want not.
                        It's only ink and paper

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                        • #13
                          I have never liked cat litter or oil dry, instead, since I do a lot of woodworking, and always have a lot of sawdust and shavings on hand, that's what I use. It's the absolute best for cleaning up spills, doesn't matter if it's a mixed oil/water spill, it will soak it up.
                          Best is disposal, toss it in the wood stove for tinder/kindling, or in case of water only spills, sweep outside.
                          Very good for gasoline or diesel, because it is more absorbent.

                          Edit: when using for gasoline, I normally set it outside to air for a while before tossing in stove or trash can
                          Last edited by kendall; 02-09-2011, 04:04 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Ground Coffee, the cheaper the better, will de-odoorize most smells in an enclosed place. Just scatter it about, leave for a few hours, then sweep it up and dump.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Al Messer
                              Ground Coffee, the cheaper the better, will de-odoorize most smells in an enclosed place. Just scatter it about, leave for a few hours, then sweep it up and dump.
                              What? Dump out perfectly good coffee?
                              I just need one more tool,just one!

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