Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Decent Lathe for Home Shop

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Decent Lathe for Home Shop

    A gentleman on another forum I visit is shopping for a lathe for his home shop and I wanted input on the various machines out there other than Harbor Freight and such in the $2000 range, new or used.
    One of his stated uses will be barrel work.

  • #2
    If his budget is only 2K he won't get a new gun smith quality lathe. If he buys used he better know how to check the machine out.

    The best low priced gun smith lathe I have seen is the Grizz G4003G. But it is closer to 3K with shipping unless he can snag the ocassional free shipping deal.

    Comment


    • #3
      For $2000 new or used but no "Harbor Freight and such" he will be looking at used machines only!


      Unless he can find a decent deal then "HF and such" may be his best bet for $2000, good used machines in that price range do happen along sometimes but they are not nearly as plentiful in most locals as some will have you believe. I suppose HF lathes are junk, they must be since so many people who don't own one say they are, so I guess mine is going to fall apart soon. It has been running perfectly almost everyday now since I bought it and I am starting my third year with it, it has turned out some really nice parts, has plenty of power and is a hell of a lot more accurate than an old worn lathe but of of course it is junk and is going to fall apart soon (showing zero signs of wear and/or failure so far) because everyone says it will. I mean they say it is junk so it MUST be right?

      Comment


      • #4
        Has anyone had any experience with one of these:-



        They look very traditional, a good size for a beginner home shop and are made in India so I presume the price is right.

        Comment


        • #5
          G4003G is a great lathe, You should really convince your friend to up his budget to 3k, it makes a BIG diffrence, and this is the most lathe per dollar you can get, Above 12x36 and the price skyrockets (like 5k for the next size up), Below 12x36 and you'll be lacking features like camlock chuck, 1.5" spindle throughhole, 2hp motor, quick change gearbox for feeds and threading, Power cross feed, etc etc, that all make using your lathe a LOT nicer.

          <Edit, Corrected model number>
          Last edited by Black_Moons; 02-12-2011, 03:52 PM.
          Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by The Artful Bodger
            Has anyone had any experience with one of these:-



            They look very traditional, a good size for a beginner home shop and are made in India so I presume the price is right.
            Is that a Ganesh (sp)? A link would of been nice, not that I am complaining considering it is TOOL PORN
            Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Black_Moons
              G4004G is a great lathe, You should really convince your friend to up his budget to 3k, it makes a BIG diffrence, and this is the most lathe per dollar you can get, Above 12x36 and the price skyrockets (like 5k for the next size up), Below 12x36 and you'll be lacking features like camlock chuck, 1.5" spindle throughhole, 2hp motor, quick change gearbox for feeds and threading, Power cross feed, etc etc, that all make using your lathe a LOT nicer.

              As the owner of a G4003G, who am I to disagree?

              But, sometimes budgetary constraints take precedence - and Precision Matthews has a line of 11" lathes that a man with $2k in his pocket might like to look at:

              http://www.machinetoolonline.com/PM-1127-VF.html

              Comment


              • #8
                The Matthews machine has some worthwhile features but there are two points that I think detract from it - One is the spindle bore is only 1 1/16" which for a lathe that size seems a bit on the small side. The other is that although it comes with a QCTP, it is a multifix knock off (so difficult to make your own) and only comes with one holder. I also wonder about the rigidity of it, given the weight of the machine.

                Michael

                Comment


                • #9
                  -->One is the spindle bore is only 1 1/16"

                  The newest machines have a 1-1/2" bore.

                  Multifix-clone adapters are available from a few independent vendors ...

                  QMT (vendor of PM machines) previously offered a conventional QCTP as an option on their 11" lathes - I'm not sure if they still do, it requires modifying the compound ...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for the replies, I will pass them on.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Personally i would have a close look at that Mathews rebadger, one company over here same machine but with bigger motor http://www.warco.co.uk/WM-280V-F-Var...95194573.aspx#

                      What i couldnt find or figure out is how the feed rates are selected. If its direct as in the one knob, is this a pain like most to engage?
                      Likewise thread cutting how are these selected? Two knobs with a certain limited range of pitches? The rest faffing about with change wheels would surely p..s even the most hardened learner off?


                      As above i would be worried about its rigidity and flex being chinese casting and weight. Although the headstock seems short and could be ideal for some short barrel work, it may not for same reason with transferred loads on the bearings.
                      In the one video shows putting a little cut on, the motor slows suggesting lack of torque associated with variable speed motors.

                      Other than that second hand US or English fully checked out, will be a lot more robust.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Jonny
                        What i couldnt find or figure out is how the feed rates are selected. If its direct as in the one knob, is this a pain like most to engage?
                        Likewise thread cutting how are these selected? Two knobs with a certain limited range of pitches? The rest faffing about with change wheels would surely p..s even the most hardened learner off?

                        I can see three knobs on the quick change gear box and I expect (as in other Chinese lathes) that each knob has serveral positions giving a plethora of feed rates and screw pitches without resorting to change gears.

                        However, changing the change wheels is part of the experience.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          How about a clausing 59xx?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Very interesting how Southeast Asia is "knocking off" old American iron more and more...I kinda like it.

                            I hope if your friend has $2k to spend he has enough knowledge of machine tools to judge wear and component breakage, features and options, and know basically how it should look. If not I would recommend he spend some time around those that do. I always recommend old iron. I realize its not as plentiful in some parts as in others, however, for what some pay I think the money is better spent retrieving it from an area that has plenty of it. $500 spent in traveling to drop the price by $1000 is simple math to me, and Ive done it several times. Machines are what the operator makes of them so I wont get into the usual arguments, but something I have personally found is that bigger is almost always better. Yes, moving large machines that weigh thousands of pounds can be tough (and fun), but rigidity and having enough horsepower is always king and big iron can be found ridiculously cheap at times too.

                            One other thing to consider is brand. Certain brands - Logan, Clausing, and a few others produced some very precise machines and can be had very inexpensively (read a few hundred $$) compared to others.
                            Last edited by justanengineer; 02-13-2011, 03:15 PM.
                            "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Totally agree with above two, one major reason i wont own another because it wont last after the time and effort to install.
                              To me buyer sounds like a new user and would benefit to some tutorials, nothing better than on the job, forget the books.

                              The change wheels have to be set up (pain) in conjunction with the two knobs and only offer a limited number of pitches. Some are a real pain to engage the knobs, many give up on trying out, as you do.
                              Fortunately this is one of the easier looking at it, some can spend literally half a day taking machine apart to change three change wheels!

                              Had enough practice copying, why dont they learn and copy Harrison or Colchester (Clausing.) Imp or metric flick of a switch and just dial in the thread you want, no faffing about.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X