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A big chunk of CNC'ed Billet ;)

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  • A big chunk of CNC'ed Billet ;)

    Saw this on the PM site
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KLNJ...layer_embedded

  • #2
    Ooooooh !! the magical "billet"!! What a clown.

    Comment


    • #3
      I've seen more than one video machining from soild an engine block.Seems a waste.Why not just fabricate the thing from plate and then machine it?Good enough for Locomotive diesels.

      Course I didn't watch much of the vid,the Cobra bodies in the background where to distracting
      I just need one more tool,just one!

      Comment


      • #4
        Gesus.....after hearing "billet" about 10 times in the first few minutes I had to throw up....
        pure shiq
        please visit my webpage:
        http://motorworks88.webs.com/

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        • #5
          Originally posted by motorworks
          Gesus.....after hearing "billet" about 10 times in the first few minutes I had to throw up....
          pure shiq
          no kidding, there was comment about recycling the chips, I bet he gets more for them because its billet
          .

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          • #6
            Nah, he gets more for the chips because out of his 386lb block, 322lbs of it was turned into chips. :P
            Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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            • #7
              Yea, and I bet he loves another buzz word, "green".
              Paul A.

              Make it fit.
              You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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              • #8
                Plenty of experts here I see...

                I am surprised no-one has said they can do the same with a cold chisel.. /rolls eyes
                Precision takes time.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Ok
                  I will post this again written by Forrest Addy a few years back...love it:
                  Note the reference to "ultimate strength and reliability" :

                  " "Billet" is a classic example of common usage in a group noted for invincible ignorance triumphing over precise technical language.

                  A "billet" is the term used to describe the material in its first stages of a hot rolling process. "The billets are heated then run through the first stand of rolls..." Before the billet was a billet it was a "bloom" and before that it was a "cast ingot." "Billet" is the material form in an intermediate step in the rolling process.

                  In the machine shop parts can be made from hot roll, cold roll, plate, welded fabrications, castings, or forgings. But never "billet". Billets never get to the machine shop because they're an intermediate product in the rolling mill. Strictly speaking it's impossible to make stuff from a "billet" unless the material was purchased in the billet form from a rolling mill. I dare say the mill would be entirely be justified in removing all the material's identifying marks and requireing the purchaser to sign a waiver of warranty acknowledging the purchased material's properties were incertifiable and its processing to commercial standards were incomplete.

                  In short actual "billet" material can very possibly be substandard compared to material that's fully processed and heat treated.

                  "Billet" is strictly a hot-rodder's term used to cover parts machined to net shape and detail from solid stock. "Billet" as a material identifier does not signify superior quality. Quite the opposite: in fact, "billet" rocker arms, connecting rods etc might be inferior in ultimate strength and reliability to identical products made from net shape forgings where the materials grain structure is directed to maximize its resistance to stress.

                  So when you see "billet" proudly printed on a colorful box of hot-rod goodies think "bull****." There's hardly a segment of the market place so bamboozled and led by fad and hysteria as hot-rodders unless it's buyers of cosmetics and male enhancement products. Ignorance and folly among purchasers is actively fostered by makers of hot rod products - purchasers who spend mountains of money to secure the last iota of performance from their favorite overweight, unreliable, unstreamlined, obsolete POS.

                  People who build hot-rods and race cars are building nothing more than high performance parade floats. They're made for glamour and to excite envy among the cannaille. The apotheoses of fast cars are Formula 1, Indy cars, and unlimited dragsters. Anything less is the province of wannbes and dreamers.

                  So use "billet" as a general material descriptor if you wish but by doing so you flaunt your ignorance of materials and their designation in the industry. If you're working in a machine shop such usage will brand you as a dunce, a wannabe, and if a customer as someone to relentlessly fleece by making them "billet" parts from plate and barstock and charging them extortionate prices. "

                  [This message has been edited by Forrest Addy (edited 04-23-2005).]
                  please visit my webpage:
                  http://motorworks88.webs.com/

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for the link, interesting.

                    While I can certainly appreciate the amount of programing and design work that went into this project I do have to wounder how it will stand up to some actual use, if not abuse.

                    The finished bare block ways only 64 lbs., most of the aluminum FE blocks I've seen are at least twice as heavy. Now I realize this must have been a maximum weight reduction effort in order to achieve this weight, but at what cost?
                    The upper cylinder area looks especially weak, very little support for the liners to my eyes. Looks like they will move under the stress of producing 5-600 hp on an occasional basis, never mind competition.

                    Maybe someone has done all the research, because they do have a lot of work into the project. But I will remain pessimistic until they put at least a 100 full power dyno runs on it without incident.

                    As I said earlier, there are some very well engineered aluminum FE blocks out there with a proven history, but they are 125 lbs. and up, you don't loose 60 lbs. off of a 125 lb. engine without making some painful decisions.
                    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      CNC Billet

                      Hey - Nay Sayers - I have a bit of experience, and I think this is pretty cool! You don't have to be GM or Honda to build an engine block, with the technology (Readily) available today. You can argue the terminology (Billet), you can argue the 'Waste' of 150+ Kg of chips (Green - disposal/Recyclye), you can argue the machine (HAAS). The fact is, these guys are not the big 3 or NASA, but they are doing it. You can pick up a used VF5 and do it too - or would you have a clue where to start?

                      Pat

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                      • #12
                        "these guys are not the big 3 or NASA, but they are doing it"

                        Sorry but..

                        No....these guys are just coping...no new ideas...

                        and yes I can....
                        please visit my webpage:
                        http://motorworks88.webs.com/

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                        • #13
                          There was a small shop here that machined forgings for some aircraft company. They had a CNC mill and apparrently no liquid coolant. There were times when the swarf was kneed deep all over the shop. The next time you went buy everything was clean again. Never did know what they did with it. It would have taken a truck load of 55 gal bbls. to haul it off. The total operation was a mother father and two sons operation. They sure made lots of chips.
                          Byron Boucher
                          Burnet, TX

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Willy
                            Thanks for the link, interesting.

                            While I can certainly appreciate the amount of programing and design work that went into this project I do have to wounder how it will stand up to some actual use, if not abuse.

                            The finished bare block ways only 64 lbs., most of the aluminum FE blocks I've seen are at least twice as heavy. Now I realize this must have been a maximum weight reduction effort in order to achieve this weight, but at what cost?
                            The upper cylinder area looks especially weak, very little support for the liners to my eyes. Looks like they will move under the stress of producing 5-600 hp on an occasional basis, never mind competition.

                            Maybe someone has done all the research, because they do have a lot of work into the project. But I will remain pessimistic until they put at least a 100 full power dyno runs on it without incident.

                            As I said earlier, there are some very well engineered aluminum FE blocks out there with a proven history, but they are 125 lbs. and up, you don't loose 60 lbs. off of a 125 lb. engine without making some painful decisions.
                            I dont know why they are making it so thin and light , since most will be driven by 260 pound doughnut munching meatloaf type guys...maybe the guys driving should loose some weight and not the engine.

                            all the best.markj

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by aboard_epsilon
                              I dont know why they are making it so thin and light , since most will be driven by 260 pound doughnut munching meatloaf type guys...maybe the guys driving should loose some weight and not the engine.

                              all the best.markj

                              I quite agree.
                              Usually the cheapest and most cost efficient way to increase performance is to put the driver on a diet.
                              This also seems to be last thing anybody thinks of.

                              I do admire the project though, lots of work. Just have to wonder of the feasibility of the end result to be worth the input in time and money.
                              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

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