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History of the 1st Micrometer

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  • History of the 1st Micrometer

    I don't often post on this site because I seem to keep pretty busy elsewhere..... As some of you know I tend to collect old and historic machinist tools..... I see there is another copy in the works here of a little hand vise I have..... anyway I have just added one of the most important pieces to my collection. A PALMER micrometer, Palmer is the inventor in 1848 of the micrometer as we know it.... these are very rare! I have posted it and more new information than has been known in over a hundred years on Palmer on the PM. Enjoy.

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...palmer-220198/

    Enjoyed meeting a bunch of you at Cabin Fever!


  • #2
    That is a very neat tool. On the subject of historic measuring tools, one of my coworkers spent some time abroad about 10 years ago running tests on a large gas turbine engine at the National Gas Turbine Test Establisment in Pyestock, England . He was there over a period of 2 years, and when he left, in honor of his dedicated and accurate work, the staff presented him with an inscribed plaque with a very old B & S 1" micrometer mounted to it . Upon closer examination, he discovered the micrometer was engraved with "PJL #1", for Power Jets Limited, the company that Frank Whittle set up in 1936 to develop the first successful jet engine. I can't even imagine the history that a tool like that was witness to.
    Davis

    "Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn't have to do it himself"

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    • #3
      That's a very neat thing!

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      • #4
        Thanks

        rivett608,

        I read your thread on PM about the Palmer Mic. Very interesting, thank you for sharing!! I appreciate the time and effort it has taken you to research and present this information.

        Tim

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        • #5
          It is however pointed out that William Gascoine of Middleton near Leeds had a micrometer in the 1600's. Problem with any measuring device (as the Chinese electronicists have found out) is repeatability of accuracy and a standardised screw thread system was needed.

          If the Horology records are traced back, there probably were many examples of "Mics" used in that trade as the term "Ligne" crops up.

          Regards Ian.
          You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

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          • #6
            A ligne is a

            French measurement. Not sure what you are trying to say. I am currently restoring a case for a folding Tailor's rule,which is graduated in Lignes,18th.C..

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            • #7
              Originally posted by rivett608
              I don't often post on this site because I seem to keep pretty busy elsewhere..... As some of you know I tend to collect old and historic machinist tools..... I see there is another copy in the works here of a little hand vise I have..... anyway I have just added one of the most important pieces to my collection. A PALMER micrometer, Palmer is the inventor in 1848 of the micrometer as we know it.... these are very rare! I have posted it and more new information than has been known in over a hundred years on Palmer on the PM. Enjoy.

              http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...palmer-220198/

              Enjoyed meeting a bunch of you at Cabin Fever!


              Nice find !!! I'm green with envy

              Some good info here -> http://www.mitutoyo.com/pdf/History_of_Micro.pdf

              john
              John

              I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

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              • #8
                Thanks John

                I had not seen that before..... I added the link to the thread.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by rivett608
                  Thanks John

                  I had not seen that before..... I added the link to the thread.
                  My pleasure.

                  john
                  John

                  I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Circlip
                    It is however pointed out that William Gascoine of Middleton near Leeds had a micrometer in the 1600's.
                    Gascoigne invented the concept of measuring distances with a screw thread, but if you look at Robert Hooke's drawing, it's a very large device mounted on a tripod, and bears little resemblance to a modern micrometer:



                    Gascoigne was an Astronomer and he used his device to measure the angular seperation between stars.
                    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                    • #11
                      Ligne is also used as a measure in horology.

                      Gascoines apparatus measured the relative distance between two points?

                      And a micrometer measures?

                      Regards Ian.
                      You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Circlip
                        It is however pointed out that William Gascoine of Middleton near Leeds had a micrometer in the 1600's.
                        Regards Ian.
                        He did say "micrometers as we know them", previous types where somewhat different and mostly bench type mics.
                        The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                        Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                        Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                        • #13
                          The first succesful micrometer designed for the engineering industry, was designed by the great Scottish engineer James Watt

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                          • #14
                            Rivett, thanks for posting this most interesting and educational topic!!!

                            Your,e postings are always very interesting, and i,m sure all of us here look forward to anymore you have in future.

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                            • #15
                              I read somewhere many years ago that Watt's piston- cylinder fit was so close you couldn't even get a shilling into the clearance. Peter
                              The difficult done right away. the impossible takes a little time.

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