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Small, model sized worm gear reducer

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    Add a pulley, and we're good to go. Man, that was almost too easy!!! as you probably noticed, i didn't turn the shaft to a smaller diameter. I used the full 9M and bored a peice of brass to 9MM to make the bushing----No reamers involved!!! ;D ;D

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    So there we have it---a beautifull little gear reducer. And this one is a 60:1 ratio.

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    And voila'---A really nifty little worm gear reducer. I will probably have to put some kind of collar on the shaft inside the aluminum endplate I will create, because depending on which way I rotate this thing the worm shaft will have a tendecy to "unscrew" itself from the worm gear. This wasn't an issue in its original shape, as there was a peice of nylon acting as a thrust bearing in the end of the motor housing.
    Last edited by brian Rupnow; 02-28-2011, 03:53 PM.

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    Since the motor housing is cylindrical with a flat on each side, the current plan is to make up a peice of aluminum plate that will fit into the peice of motor housing which has the flange on it and center drill it for a .3125 bushing. The shaft is 9mm, but since all my reamers are imperial sizes, I'll turn the end of the shaft down to .321' (5/16") 7.94MM and have enough shaft sticking out of the end of the housing/aluminum plate to mount a pulley on.

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    The armature shaft is one straight peice, and the armature itself appears to be made from a stack of metal discs that are attached to the shaft with some kind of epoxy. It cuts easily with a carbide tool in the lathe. The copper commutator is not really attached to the shaft at all. It is held in place by the 2 miles of copper wire that are woven thru the armature discs and soldered to the copper commutator bars. Once the wires are cut away on the lathe, you can pull the copper commutator off the shaft easily.

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    I took it home and disassembled it, and found some very interesting things. First, the permanent magnets are glued into the motor casing, but readily release when the sides of the motor housing are heated with an acetylene torch. The housing itself is made from mild steel.

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  • brian Rupnow
    started a topic Small, model sized worm gear reducer

    Small, model sized worm gear reducer

    I have another project underway (which has to do with the hit and miss engine I recently finished) and I needed a small, powerfull gear reducer that wouldn't back feed torque thru the input shaft. A worm gear reducer was my first choice, because a worm gear drive with a ratio of greater than 40:1 won't back feed. I happened to be "browsing" in Princess Auto, and found brand new wiper motor assemblies for $9 and change. I bought one for my new toy.
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