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  • O.T sort of what to save

    Hi,
    Most of us save a lot of stuff for use later ( hopefully ) it would be nice if I/we had a list of things to save and bits of metal worth saving. An example would be leaf springs ( spring steel? ) Shock absorber shafts ( what type of steel is it ), and what to save out of appliances ect. (switches ect.) most of us look at such stuff but don't know what to look for maby a thread with stuff and uses for it ? I for one hate to through anything away if i can use part of it.
    Richard

  • #2
    It's funny you should mention that!

    We had to replace one of our clothes washing machines. Pump or something went bad on the one. It is fifteen years old. Normally I would take the old one directly to the recycling place. BUT after being on this forum for some time now I got to thinking.....mnnnnn. Maybe this thing could be re-purposed into a CNC mill or something. The wife just rolled her eyes when I had that thought outloud.

    Normally I would have just thrown it away. But now maybe I can salvage a motor, pulleys, switches or who knows what. I thought about using it to roll pieces in stones as a tumbler.

    You people on this board have changed how I look at the world!

    My motto used to be: When in doubt throw it out. If you can't move it paint it!
    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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    • #3
      As a rule of thumb, I keep:
      Motors, switches, pulleys, shafts, bushing/sleeves, gears, bolts/nuts, and any rubber dampers/bushings/feet, springs, and any material that looks like I could make something out of it. Usually I'll come up with some ideas as to what to do with something while I'm taking it apart.....which of course, occurs after I take it out to the shop, and generally occupies the whole weekend. The wife gets pissed because she always has to wait until the next weekend to get her new stuff up and running.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Black Forest
        We had to replace one of our clothes washing machines. Pump or something went bad on the one. It is fifteen years old. Normally I would take the old one directly to the recycling place. BUT after being on this forum for some time now I got to thinking.....mnnnnn. Maybe this thing could be re-purposed into a CNC mill or something. The wife just rolled her eyes when I had that thought outloud.

        Normally I would have just thrown it away. But now maybe I can salvage a motor, pulleys, switches or who knows what. I thought about using it to roll pieces in stones as a tumbler.

        You people on this board have changed how I look at the world!

        My motto used to be: When in doubt throw it out. If you can't move it paint it!
        She can thank you later when your property tax assessment downwardly spirals for years to come because your neighbours think you are the recycle station by the looks of your yard.........GRIN

        I now am the people I used to laugh about driving by.........wife hasn't fully bought into it all yet though.......LOL

        This is one thing that just keeps saving you money.........
        Opportunity knocks once, temptation leans on the doorbell.....

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        • #5
          I have at least three machines powered by washing machine motors. Garage door openers have become a source for shafting, chain, leadscrews (very coarse at 3 tpi). Various kitchen appliances are sources for gears, motors, belts, high temp wire, fans, sheet steel, glass, silicone tubing, heating elements, high temp insulation. Dead amplifiers supply transformers, high value capacitors, bridge rectifiers, power transistors, sometimes solid aluminum rounds. Printing calculators have a small but powerful speed-regulated dc motor.

          I once brought home a boot sewing machine. Chock full of metal parts, bearings, castings, a good solid cast base and tower. Those washing machine sized printers- I don't have room to describe the useful items that can be robbed from them. Treadmills, old military equipment, electric wheelchairs, cameras, vcrs

          there must be SOMETHING I haven't taken apart and saved parts from-
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #6
            I've gotten selective....

            Washing machine motors just don't cut it, they are the cheapest open frame stamped stuff possible.... ugly and need enclosure inside the device. Usually don't reverse, either

            Our old dryer, on the other hand, from the 1970s, had a regular enclosed cast end bell motor in it. unfortunately, the motor had frozen up and overheated, the one thing that was missing from it was oil holes, so it wasn't useful.

            new machines may have more interesting motors, variable speed systems, some have "switched reluctance" motors, etc, etc. But they are quite reliable, and the motors are one of the most likely things to go bad.
            1601

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

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            • #7
              Someone recently posted a chart of what types of materials things were made of.

              That might be handy for re-purposing some of the salvage materials.

              Maybe someone has a link to the chart.

              Brian
              OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

              THINK HARDER

              BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

              MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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              • #8
                Looks like a lot of us are members of Pack Rat Anonymous. Remember, the more we stash away the higher our standing in the overall ratings. Right now I am in the top half of the ratings Nation wide.
                It's only ink and paper

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Carld
                  Looks like a lot of us are members of Pack Rat Anonymous. Remember, the more we stash away the higher our standing in the overall ratings. Right now I am in the top half of the ratings Nation wide.
                  Add to that the indescribable feeling that you get when you find a use for something that you have been saving for 20 or 30 years. Don't get much better than that.

                  Brian
                  OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                  THINK HARDER

                  BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                  MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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                  • #10
                    The down side

                    The down side is when you spend a lot of time looking for that thing you know you saved off something that would work just right for what you need now. Only you haven't seen it in years and have no clue in which box or drawer it is hiding.

                    Normally it would be cheaper to just go buy a new one if you factor in your time to find the salvaged part!
                    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Whats worse is having kept that stuff for years and then the sudden clean up/purge feeling hits and you go crazy getting rid of stuff that you will never use and need the space it occupies.......yup one week later the project/repair presents itself with those items you just got rid of........happened to me more than once.
                      Opportunity knocks once, temptation leans on the doorbell.....

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                      • #12
                        Even worse, you sort through and throw out all the stuff you will never need keeping only materials for definite purposes and stuff that you know you will never be able to buy again....... then move house and try to find room for it all in the new place, which is actually bigger but somehow there is less room in there..

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                        • #13
                          I have "stuff" still boxed up from 3 moves ago...
                          Video meliora proboque deteriora sequor

                          www.garagegunsmithing.com

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                          • #14
                            I have 3 of my neighbors now trained to check with me before throwing anything mechanical or electrical away. So far I have gained a computer and a great sound system for my shop, several electric motors and numerous pieces of shaft and other metals.
                            _____________________________________________

                            I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                            Oregon Coast

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                            • #15
                              I try not to collect anything not immediately useful. And I don't make it a habit to cannibalize junk parts. Most of it's junk, or it's common odd-n-ends I don't need to warehouse.

                              If it's good junk, I'll keep it, or if I have a specific project in mind, that's OK. But otherwise I'd be drowning in old electronics, plumbing parts, bits of wire, oddball construction supplies, etc.

                              Whenever I have a doubt, I think of that show on TV ( I think TLC), the hoarder show, you know the one.

                              Gary
                              Gary


                              Appearance is Everything...

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