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  • Multiplaz a good idea?

    I just got a call from this outfit looking for dealers in the US. They claim they've got this plasma machine that will do anything and everything. Weld, solder, braze, cut ferrous, non-ferrous, concrete, what have you. It is said to use plain water or a water alcohol mix for some operations as a consumable.

    They referred me to the website www.multiplaz.com to look them over. It's an interesting pitch but I don't have enough experience with plasma machines to evaluate their claims. Anyone else actually seen or operated one of these things?

    I might also mention that I also haven't been able to verify their claim of prize winning at a Geneva Invention show, but I simply may not have found the right reference.
    .
    "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

  • #2
    Its hard to tell with out actually using it. After watching the copper welding video it looks akward to use unlike a "TIG", for that type of welding I prefer the small TIG torch. It might be a good unit to carry on a service truck or home shop since its 120 volts.

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    • #3
      I read most of the link and my BS detector is buzzing....the "unbiased" testimonial from the hot rod dude segues into a sales pitch that is darn close to plagarism of the rest of the site.

      I would want a lot more of the physics of the device explained, and make sure they don't have a Nigerian mailing address, etc.

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      • #4
        Pretty big claims for 110 volt unit. Says in 1 place it cuts 7/16",in another it cuts 3/8".

        That flame doesn't look like it would do neat cuts,either.

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        • #5
          Don't know about the company. I did a bit of googling and found a wikipedia entry on plasma welding. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plasma_arc_welding

          The article references the American Welding society Handbook.

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          • #6
            Plasma cutters have been around long enough to be a known quantity. This combination with welding and the water/alcohol bit stands out. Knowing nothing about this device or much at all about the major plasma outfits, my first questions would be why isn't anyone else using one or both of these different characteristics. The big guys have money for research and marketing and a piece of market territory to defend. There may well be real technical merits but it starts to sound like the 100 mpg carburetor.
            .
            "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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            • #7
              The hot rodder claims near the end of his testimonial that the torch uses 2.5kw which is equivalent to three 100W bulbs. Seems like an egregious error that shouldn't be on the site.

              2.5kw is near 25a at 110v so this could be an issue with most 110v outlets, where 15a is typical. Their newest 3.5kw unit would definitely be an issue for most outlets.

              The soldering video notes that after use you should immerse the tip of the unit in water "until it stops hissing". So it may not be practical for jobs longer than those shown in the videos; the unit may get too hot to hold.

              Seems like a good approach would be to ask for an evaluation unit on loan. If they want you as a dealer this would seem a reasonable request.

              John
              Location: Newtown, CT USA

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              • #8
                They have a new and redesigned web site, they have been humping the unit for a number of years both to sell and as an item to sell. They started out on welding forums/metal arts forums.
                Biggest thing they have to over come is their imported only. There must be a reason that Hobart, Miller, Lincoln, Esab and Harbor Freight haven't jumped on the band wagon.
                As somebody from Millers service dept pointed out, they do work to a point, but they are limited in scope as to size, duration etc.
                Like this one been around for a while, you have seen the auto version on the news neither one has gone anywhere. Many thousands of units are in use as jewelry welding water torches.etc.
                like this one
                or this one most of the smaller units are north of $5,000
                Glen
                Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
                I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
                All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

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                • #9
                  Reply to TGtool

                  Hi i represent EcoWelder company that is an authorized reseller and service center for Multiplaz 3500 in Burbank, CA 91501. I will be more than happy to address any of your concerns in regards to product operation, maintenance, functionality etc

                  Also I've been doing a couple of demonstrations in San Fernando Valley and posted out videos at our blog: http://www.facebook.com/EcoWelder

                  This technology did indeed get a Gran Prix prize at the 26th International Salon of Inventions in Geneva in 1997.

                  Best,

                  Ecowelder

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                  • #10
                    From the description it indeed sounds like a basic electrolysis welder, meaning it breaks water to oxygen & hydrogen with electricity. Yes it works and yes it is nice to have an "unlimited" source of "gas" and the flame is stoichiometric at all times (unless you dope it), meaning no extra oxygen or fuel gas. And no soot, but water as a burning product

                    Those have been used for ages by goldsmiths/jewelry makers. Been thinking of building one myself.
                    Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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                    • #11
                      So where has it been in the intervening 14 years since it's prize winning debut.

                      Why don't I already have one in my workshop? Does anybody? If you can answer that you will know whether it represents a business opportunity or not.

                      Phil

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                      • #12
                        I forgot to buy one.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Jaakko Fagerlund
                          From the description it indeed sounds like a basic electrolysis welder, meaning it breaks water to oxygen & hydrogen with electricity. Yes it works and yes it is nice to have an "unlimited" source of "gas" and the flame is stoichiometric at all times (unless you dope it), meaning no extra oxygen or fuel gas. And no soot, but water as a burning product

                          Those have been used for ages by goldsmiths/jewelry makers. Been thinking of building one myself.

                          I think it is part electrolysis and part atomic hydrogen welder.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by macona
                            I think it is part electrolysis and part atomic hydrogen welder.
                            What do you mean by part? It works with electrolysis, nothing more and nothing special. What comes to atomic hydrogen (H), that is a molecule that doesn't like to stay alone but rather likes to form hydrogen gas (H2).

                            Sure one could put an arc after the nozzle to achieve plasma like condition in the very end (this would form plain atomic hydrogen), but how much advantage would it give?
                            Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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                            • #15
                              Specification: Welding type - Plasma and Plasma arc.

                              What - No tig ?

                              There are plenty of Tig machines out there that will do MMA and plasma cutting. With a Tig machine you can solder, braze, weld anything that will melt...

                              Until this technique establishes a niche in some industrial processes, they haven't found their marketplace. They certainly haven't found their Unique Selling Point.
                              Richard - SW London, UK, EU.

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