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Multiplaz a good idea?

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  • PTSideshow
    replied
    If you want the straight skinny on the unit from somebody that has one. Bought one and has put it through the claims and gives what appears to be an Honest comments it works good on heavy thick stuff the thin delicate not so good. multi plaz

    And why do you keep trying to say this is something new Ecowelder the previous version of the it was on the web for about ten years I know I have had a bookmark about it for at least 7 years that I can find.

    This model may be a new version

    Leave a comment:


  • EddyCurr
    replied
    There was some discussion on WeldingWeb during the summer. WW Member
    soutthpaw has some comments in post #44.

    There are some comments from others regarding background of the device.

    .

    Leave a comment:


  • EcoWelder
    replied
    EcoWelder

    Hi guys,

    I am sorry I've been very busy recently. I just wanted to let you know that I am not some snake oil salesman. EcoWelder is my company and we are specializing in innovative solutions in metalworking. We started out with Multiplaz 3500. Although, I am not an engineer and do not have detailed information on the operational process of Multiplaz 3500 I personally know the developers of this product. Here is my suggestion: please list me all of the question you have to this date and I will forward them to the engineers who will gladly provide answers and I will post them here.

    Also please be advised that we have a blog on facebook where some of our customers posted their feedback in regards to Multiplaz 3500. I recommend anyone interested to visit it.

    Best,

    EcoWelder

    Originally posted by Black Forest
    So what happened to EcoWelder? He said he would answer questions. He never came back.

    I wonder why he doesn't come on here and clear up some of the mystery.

    Does snake oil salesman come to mind?

    Leave a comment:


  • PTSideshow
    replied
    For any that may find a complete manual of the multiplaz 3500 in downloadable PDF click on the manual icon

    And for additional info those that have a subscription to the home shop machinist magazine, and have received the current issue the distributor in Cal is an advertiser in the magazine.

    My widget for the country of origin for my browser shows that it is from Mother Russian Federation ,Ip 194.190.200.142

    So it is from Russia by way of China

    Leave a comment:


  • PTSideshow
    replied
    He was violating the no selling/spam policy, and the first eco welder was a women working as a spammer type joining forums and posting their addy and facebook pages.

    It was originally from Mother Russia by way of China,
    the following is from a guy in OZ that bought one and is trying to figure out if it is worth it and if he should sell all his other equipment. He is on a welding forum and been posting a running account of his use of it.

    The fact that I am able to do the welding so far using just the 240 volt 10 amp supply is quite an eye opener as the unit is designed to go 15 amps.

    The jury is still out on the Tig mode for lighter work, and I haven't had a test for alluminium or stainless yet.....coming next time.

    If'n I can get the unit to do credible welds on Ally and stainless I'll seriously consider selling up the other units.

    I'll post some more as soon as I get some more done....so far it's 7/10 in favour of the transition.
    At this moment in time I'd have to say that doing delicate work like thin steel plate or alluminium and stainless is going to take a bit more practice to get the method right....early days yet, so no letting the Tig, Mig, Stick and Argon set-up go for a while yet.
    Ian.

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    EcoWeldor?

    So what happened to EcoWelder? He said he would answer questions. He never came back.

    I wonder why he doesn't come on here and clear up some of the mystery.

    Does snake oil salesman come to mind?

    Leave a comment:


  • Black_Moons
    replied
    So how good is vaporised water/alcohol as a shielding gas anyway?

    Leave a comment:


  • Just Bob Again
    replied
    Originally posted by macona
    I found the patent for it. US Patent 6087616.
    Patent 1892325 (1932) "Means for converting the electric arc into an elongated flame". Inject steam into the arc and make something that looks like a flame. They've improved the technology but the basic idea is old and there are lots of similar patents.

    I don't know why the multiplaz people try so hard to hide what this thing really is. Maybe they think more people will buy it if they think it's really new and it's magic. Makes me less likely to consider it. Anyway, it costs like 2 grand. Having to drop the torch in a bucket of water when you're done doesn't inspire my confidence.

    Leave a comment:


  • macona
    replied
    I found the patent for it. US Patent 6087616.

    http://www.google.com/patents?id=XfM...epage&q&f=true

    Basically it is a plasma torch that uses water vapor as the plasma gas. The surround of the plasma chamber is a porous material fed with water. The heat from the pilot arc vaporizes the water. Looks like pilot arc current controls the water vapor pressure, guessing the "mode 1" setting, and mode 2 sets the transfer current.

    So I was wrong, it is pretty much like an ordinary plasma welder just with a liquid consumable gas.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jaakko Fagerlund
    replied
    Originally posted by Just Bob Again
    Would be nice if you stated the actual facts, not wild assumptions. It is not a hydrogen/oxygen torch using electrolysis. I don't endorse the machine and it looks like they deliberately leave out a lot of info on their website, but this is a type of plasma torch. They mix water and alcohol (or other hydrocarbons), it gets flashed into steam and an arc is used to generate the plasma. Very similar to a plasma cutter but steam rather than compressed air. The idea has been around a long time. Don't know why it has not been a commercial success. Developed in the Soviet Union I think.
    Well, funny then that in the actual video (welding copper) they load it up with ordinary tap water and a flame comes out.

    Leave a comment:


  • Just Bob Again
    replied
    Originally posted by Jaakko Fagerlund
    What do you mean by part? It works with electrolysis, nothing more and nothing special.
    Would be nice if you stated the actual facts, not wild assumptions. It is not a hydrogen/oxygen torch using electrolysis. I don't endorse the machine and it looks like they deliberately leave out a lot of info on their website, but this is a type of plasma torch. They mix water and alcohol (or other hydrocarbons), it gets flashed into steam and an arc is used to generate the plasma. Very similar to a plasma cutter but steam rather than compressed air. The idea has been around a long time. Don't know why it has not been a commercial success. Developed in the Soviet Union I think.

    Leave a comment:


  • rohart
    replied
    Specification: Welding type - Plasma and Plasma arc.

    What - No tig ?

    There are plenty of Tig machines out there that will do MMA and plasma cutting. With a Tig machine you can solder, braze, weld anything that will melt...

    Until this technique establishes a niche in some industrial processes, they haven't found their marketplace. They certainly haven't found their Unique Selling Point.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jaakko Fagerlund
    replied
    Originally posted by macona
    I think it is part electrolysis and part atomic hydrogen welder.
    What do you mean by part? It works with electrolysis, nothing more and nothing special. What comes to atomic hydrogen (H), that is a molecule that doesn't like to stay alone but rather likes to form hydrogen gas (H2).

    Sure one could put an arc after the nozzle to achieve plasma like condition in the very end (this would form plain atomic hydrogen), but how much advantage would it give?

    Leave a comment:


  • macona
    replied
    Originally posted by Jaakko Fagerlund
    From the description it indeed sounds like a basic electrolysis welder, meaning it breaks water to oxygen & hydrogen with electricity. Yes it works and yes it is nice to have an "unlimited" source of "gas" and the flame is stoichiometric at all times (unless you dope it), meaning no extra oxygen or fuel gas. And no soot, but water as a burning product

    Those have been used for ages by goldsmiths/jewelry makers. Been thinking of building one myself.

    I think it is part electrolysis and part atomic hydrogen welder.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rustybolt
    replied
    I forgot to buy one.

    Leave a comment:

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