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avoiding electrocution with a stick welder advice needed

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  • #16
    All that is true and sometimes I wonder who is the most dangerous, a professional welder or a home welder. Both will take chances but the alleged pro has more hours in the day to get careless and take chances.

    When I think of the times I got shocked while welding it was always doing something wrong or carelessness.

    Yes, welding can be dangerous.

    EDIT: I have to agree with turning off the welding to replace a rod if the situation was like the story. Having a person by the switch on the welder is also a good idea and may have saved the welders life. Under normal dry conditions all that is not needed.
    Last edited by Carld; 03-06-2011, 12:10 AM.
    It's only ink and paper

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    • #17
      Originally posted by PeteF

      Did you read the report I posted? That's EXACTLY what the NZ OSHA DO recommend!
      That's gonna be popular with the structural steel welders......

      Someone wants to sell a lot of remotes.
      2730

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

      Everything not impossible is compulsory

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      • #18
        Originally posted by J Tiers
        That's gonna be popular with the structural steel welders......

        Someone wants to sell a lot of remotes.
        No,no,no. Can't you see the job opportunities we're missing. Every ironworker thats welding out on a jobsite would need an operating engineer to stand down by the welder. Ironworker hollers down to operator "Ok Joe turn it off, I gotta put another rod in. Ok Joe turn it back on." Just think stimulus!

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        • #19
          I don't know about other welders but the Miller Dynastys have a circuit in them that drops the open circuit voltage down to around 8V to avoid shock situations. Makes striking an arc interesting though - rather than touch and pull away it's more like striking a match.

          My advice to the poster is to take a welding course so that he is more familar with the welding process and the safety involved. Welding in normal shop conditions is not extremely hazardous although there are some (like everything) safety rules to be followed. Tools are a lot like savage dogs. You must treat them with respect as they can hurt you, but if they sense fear then they are more likely to attack!

          Michael

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          • #20
            Voltage and current needed to injure or kill

            http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/cons...eccurrent.html
            This lists the values of CURRENT required to do damage to the human body.
            Note that at 40 Volts AC it is very unlikely you will even feel the shock if you are dry.
            I was taught that 110 Volts was about the lowest LETHAL voltage under good conditions and that was one of the reasons it was chosen as the US standard.
            That means with reasonable care you will never be injured by the voltage and current from a welder.
            Just be carefull about staying dry and you will be fine.
            Bill
            I cut it off twice and it's still too short!

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            • #21
              No No no ... won't work just using an operating engineer at the machine...The WELDER has to go down and install his "lock-out" lock.
              Joe B

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              • #22
                avoiding electrocution with a stick welder advice needed

                From reading all these posts, and yes I have welded for years, my advice is this. And this applies to every machine of any kind. If you are afraid of the machine and what it will do to you, sell it and hire someone else to do the work. If your mind is on maybe getting hurt you will. It happens everyday with every machine from home hand saws to bulldozers. Don't use something you are thinking you may get hurt on. Back to welding, take a shop course on welding and you get a better understanding of how the thing works and how to use it in a safe way.

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                • #23
                  While we're almost on the subject , here's another question. I once asked a professional electrician what kind of gloves he wore when working on or near live voltages. We were probably talking about 240 volts maximum. He told me he wore ordinary leather gloves , like the kind he was wearing at the time. They were rather thin, lightweight gloves. I've never understood why thin leather gloves would be adequate for this purpose, since hand moisture could surely reduce the resistance of the gloves to a dangerously low level. Any suggestions ?

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                  • #24
                    Sounds like BS....

                    Electricians working hot wires wear, at least the ones I know do, rubber gloves, or rubber with leather over to keep from poking holes in them.

                    Linemen definitely do, and the gloves are tested on a regular schedule to ensure they are OK.

                    Disclaimer: this information is probably 10 - 15 years old now, maybe they do something different now.
                    2730

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

                    Everything not impossible is compulsory

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      There is no need to take chances changing the electrode. Just drill a row of holes in a block of wood and line up a number of electrodes before starting work then clip the handpiece on a new one as required.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by J Tiers
                        Sounds like BS....

                        Electricians working hot wires wear, at least the ones I know do, rubber gloves, or rubber with leather over to keep from poking holes in them.

                        Linemen definitely do, and the gloves are tested on a regular schedule to ensure they are OK.

                        Disclaimer: this information is probably 10 - 15 years old now, maybe they do something different now.
                        As a Journeyman Lineman, I can assure you that dry leather gloves are and have for decades been rated for use on 240V AC although I have gotten the odd bat on hot summer days when the sweat was pouring off us and the gloves got really damp. Our gloves are definitely not lightweight due to the work done; they are as heavy or heavier than any you find in any store.
                        Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Arcane
                          As a Journeyman Lineman, I can assure you that dry leather gloves are and have for decades been rated for use on 240V AC although I have gotten the odd bat on hot summer days when the sweat was pouring off us and the gloves got really damp. Our gloves are definitely not lightweight due to the work done; they are as heavy or heavier than any you find in any store.
                          Dat works in Saskatoon...... no way in St Louis...... at 35C or higher and 60 to 80% humidity, they wear rubber gloves
                          2730

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

                          Everything not impossible is compulsory

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            When I had an electrician install my upgraded service ( 60 amps originally - to 200 amp) I watched as he pulled the old meter from the box. He put on a set of these linesman gloves, and then put on a pair of leather work gloves over the rubber gloves before grabbing the meter.

                            Toyota issued me a pair of the same rubber linesman gloves (1,000 volt rating) for working on the high voltage side of hybrid vehicles. (300 volts DC) I was mighty glad to have them during some of those St. Louis summer days. I've seen the results of what happens when one of those systems experiences a direct short, and want no part of it with wet -or- dry hands.

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                            • #29
                              I appreciate the replies on my question about gloves for electrical work. I do wonder, however, if some of the specialty electrical gloves aren't a bit excessive, and made to satisfy OHSA and other standards instead of being practical and effective. In order to work with gloves, they do need to be flexible , and that usually means thin as well. And gloves made for 1000 volts may not be necessary for the 240 volts that a home shop owner may encounter. The requirement for "testing" gloves every 6 months is something a home shop owner is not likely to do either. So it may well be that a good pair of leather gloves, replaced once in a while, is still a good option. I do think, though, that if you feel your hands are sweating a lot, you may need to switch to dry gloves . The professional electrician I spoke of in my original post who used leather gloves worked at the time for a large corporation that was a pioneer in safety, and I do not understand why he would use those gloves if they were not adequate for the work. Money was certainly no object. My conversation with him was back in the early 1980s, and perhaps today he would use different gloves.

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                              • #30
                                Highpower:

                                Do the hybrids have an OSHA arc flash hazard rating? Do you also use flash-rated goggles or the like?
                                2730

                                Keep eye on ball.
                                Hashim Khan

                                Everything not impossible is compulsory

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