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Used Endmills, worth it?

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  • Used Endmills, worth it?

    http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI...tem=1712106763

    Are used endmills worth it, especially if bought unseen?

    Albert



  • #2
    Albert,
    Job lots of cuters such as this are worth it if the price doesn't go too stupid.
    If you get 5 or 6 real good ones in the lot that's the cost recovered.
    As a beginner it's suprising how many you eat up learning about speeds and feed.
    You get loads of milling jobs that are just shapes or flat surfaces. Cutter size isn't critical. This is where the odd ones come in handy and allow you to keep the sized new ones for the finishing cuts.
    Don't throw the blunt, chipped or welded ones away. They can easily be converted to special cutters. It's late here, 12.30 am, I'll post some pics in the morning of some modified cutters.

    One thing I did notice with the ebay cutters is that they don't mention size. No way from the photo can you work out the average shank size. Could be 1/4" and 3/8" but also could be 3/4" and 1"
    No a lot of use if you only have a mini - mill {grin }

    John S.
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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    • #3
      Albert
      Email them and ask what sizes they are. Looks like a nice assortment. The Purplish coating on a few of them is TiCN (tougher than TiN). Some of the mills appearto be Osborn mills (expensive). If you can get them for under 30US - I think you will be happy with them. If nothing else the shanks can always be used to make another cutting tool or part (as JS has suggested). I have purchased from those guys and am quite pleased with the tools.

      The cheapest way to send to Canada is usually Parcel Post - they only charge a $5 brokerage fee. UPS charges $50 brokerage - unless shipped next day air, then brokerage is free. Federal Express and FedEx Ground both charge brokerage fees (I have paid upto $45 for brokerage).

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      • #4
        My personal feeling, after a few excursions into the used cutting tool market, is to forget it and buy new unless you have a way of sharpening them. Not always, of course, but my general experience has been that if the cutting tool is used enough so somebody wants to get rid of it, it's used enough so I don't want it either.
        ----------
        Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
        Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
        Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
        There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
        Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
        Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

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        • #5
          Thurd,

          So much for the Free Trade. The brokerage fee that these shipping companies charge is highway robbery. I got burned few time buying low cost electronic items, where I ended up paying more for the brokerage fee than cost of the good.

          I'll investigate the next day air shipping so as to avoid this charge. Thanks for the heads up.

          Albert


          [This message has been edited by Rotate (edited 03-12-2002).]

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          • #6
            I had pretty good luck with one of their "5 lb lots" of used end mills...most were sharp and in a variety of sizes. They sell used tooling in store for $4.00/lb so I wouldn't bid over the mid $20 range. On average the mills included in the 5 lb lot looked better than the $4/lb stuff in store...I don't know if they pick the best for the internet lots or not.

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            • #7
              Albert,
              I've posted a pic at:-
              http://homepage.ntlworld.com/machine...nd%20mills.jpg
              Shows 5 cutters, left to right.
              One with a 45 degree angle ground on for chamfering edges.
              Next, 6 flute end mill ground down at the end and the teeth relieved to form a counterbore.
              Next, a 1/2" shanked cutter ground like a parting tool to put 'O' ring grooves in, using the mill and a boring head.
              Next, same as the second cutter but only 4 flute and the shank has been relieved at the back to allow it to go deep.
              Last is a 2 flute cutter with just one land remaining to form a boring tool.
              Just some ideas, remember these cutters are solid HSS all the way to the end.
              Small 1/4" cutters that get broken I use as inserts for the boring bars on the lathes.

              John S.
              .

              Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



              Comment


              • #8
                John

                Excellent ideas!

                What type of grinder do you use to make such cutters?

                I haven't gone past off hand sharpening of drills & lathe bits on a regular grinder yet, but some sort of t & c grinder is definitely on the wish list!

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                • #9
                  Herb,
                  I actually have a tool and cutter grinder and a Myford MG9 cylindrical grinder.
                  I usually use the Myford to reduce the shanks and then freehand relieve the teeth on a small cup wheel.
                  I very rarely use the T&C grinder as it's such a pain to setup.

                  I have 'published' this photo before but never had much return from it. People think it's a toy but there is no good reason why this setup won't work.
                  It will be far more universal and rigid that the Woden or Tinker type.
                  Pic is at:-
                  http://homepage.ntlworld.com/machine...20grinder1.jpg

                  It's a staged shot. You just need 4 pieces, 3 of which can double up in use for what they were made for. With the exception of the bench grinder the whole lot can be built for under $50.00.
                  With a decent base and a bit of inginuity this setup could grind all the tools in a home shop. Including drills if you fitted a cam to the barrel of the 5C indexer.

                  John S.
                  .

                  Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                  • #10
                    John
                    Thanks - Interesting idea for a grinding setup!
                    Surface grinder is also on the wish list. Would a setup like the one that you show in the pic work on same?
                    Can you refer me to a good book(s) on tool & cutter grinding? (This question open to anyone)
                    Herb
                    (whoops - screwed up on the first edit)
                    [This message has been edited by Herb W (edited 03-14-2002).]

                    [This message has been edited by Herb W (edited 03-14-2002).]

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                    • #11
                      Herb,
                      No reason at all why not.
                      It would be easier in this case as all you would need is the 5C spin index fixture.

                      John S.
                      .

                      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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