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64 1/2" Bandsaw Blades for cutting Stainless Steel

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  • 64 1/2" Bandsaw Blades for cutting Stainless Steel

    Any recommendations guys - I'm looking over at Enco mainly because they'll have them shipped to me no later then Tuesday. I have a bunch of 4" x .187 SS plate to cut, and I need this done as soon as possible

    Hands down "I think" Morse are the best blades out there but I don't see Enco carrying them any more. I might look at other sources to see what the price and shipping combined look like for Morse

    Any advice and experience would be appreciated fellas

  • #2
    I'd check with Travers Tool to see what they have available.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by JoeFin
      Any recommendations I have a bunch of 4" x .187 SS plate to cut, and I need this done as soon as possible
      Any advice and experience would be appreciated fellas
      On little stuff like that if it is going to get cleaned up in the mill I use My porta- band. It is fast and blades are cheaper and available almost everywhere.

      On a side note the only carbide drill bit I found is a #9, I don't know what happened to the others.

      Steve

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      • #4
        That's a job for a Lenox bi-metal blade material, if you absolutely have to saw it. Are you cutting through the .187" thickness with the blade 90؛ to the workpiece, such as in a vertical band saw? If so, you need a VERY fine-tooth blade. If cutting across the broad area of the 4" dimension (horizontal band saw), you will be best with a 4-6 mixed tooth blade. In that 1/2" tall x .020" thick blade, it seems a 10-14 mixed tooth is the coarsest you can get. Be light on feed and it should be fine. The Starrett blades are pretty good too. I have both, and really like the performance. MSC still stills the Morse, but I didn't see any of the length you need.

        http://www1.mscdirect.com/cgi/NNSRIT...-SearchResults

        BTW, MSC owns Enco and J&L Supply. Order from any of those on Monday, and if the item is in stock you'll probably have it in your hands on Tuesday with normal shipping charges.
        Last edited by PixMan; 03-06-2011, 06:20 AM.

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        • #5
          You might want to set the stock at an angle. 4" is a broad cut for a small bandsaw while .187 is the opposite. Set it up at an angle so you have about 1/2-1" in the cut and I think it will work better regardless of your blade choice.

          Or stack multiple .187 together and cut all at once.

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          • #6
            I'm a big fan of Lenox blades, and everyone is right, be careful of your tooth count. SS already work hardens easily, and too many teeth in the cut will just rub the work and then you are stuck. Run it slow and rig up a drip coolant setup.
            James Kilroy

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            • #7
              Originally posted by doctor demo
              On little stuff like that if it is going to get cleaned up in the mill I use My porta- band. It is fast and blades are cheaper and available almost everywhere.

              On a side note the only carbide drill bit I found is a #9, I don't know what happened to the others.

              Steve
              I bought 20 of the #29 carbide drills on eboner

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              • #8
                Originally posted by PixMan
                If cutting across the broad area of the 4" dimension (horizontal band saw), you will be best with a 4-6 mixed tooth blade. In that 1/2" tall x .020" thick blade, it seems a 10-14 mixed tooth is the coarsest you can get.
                Yep the 10 -14 TPI was what I was looking for

                That was another thing - I didn't see any of the Variable TPI saw blades offered as well.

                The 4" x 6" plates are all pre-drilled in the mill for 6ea parts before they go over to the saw to be cut into 1" x 4" sections. In the layout I have a .125" waste section where the cut needs to take place. Controlling blade wandering is why the plates are being laid flat

                Thanks for all the help guys - I'll check MSC and see what they have

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                • #9
                  I use the Starrett blades from
                  Mcmaster. I have a 10-14 and a 6-10 that work well for everything but sheet metal

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                  • #10
                    You may want to check www.toolcenter.com

                    When I bought my stuff, they had a nice variety of Lenox bi-metal bandsaw blades, and the prices were pretty good.
                    Mike
                    WI/IL border, USA

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                    • #11
                      It always bothers me that no one carries some 4-6tpi blades in that size, since it seems like a lot of people make cuts that those would be great in on those saws.

                      That said, with a little tweaking you should be able to get it to cut straight with the narrow side up, I do that all the time, and then you could use a >14tpi blade (16-18 would probably be optimum) or divide that in half for every time you can double that up (your 10-14variable pitch blade would probably work well cutting 2 of them at a time, it's going to suck and take a lot of time cutting the flat surface...)

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                      • #12
                        Send a query to some of the guys on e-bay.
                        I found one guy who makes up his own out of roll stock. I sent him a message & he said to "bring it on". Said he'll make it any length I want.
                        (needed a 3tpi blade for a 7x12 metal bandsaw to cut some big alum.)

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                        • #13
                          http://www1.mscdirect.com/eCommerce/...atchallpartial




                          MSC has Lenox blades in the 64.5" length with various pitches. It's too bad that Enco doesn't carry them anymore. I can't remember whether my last order included 2 Morse or 2 Lenox blades, but I've used them both and I like them both really well. I think Lenox is a step above Morse, but they're both good.


                          Looks like the coarsest is 6-10 if you plan on cutting them longways or up to 24 if you are cutting them on the thin side.

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                          • #14
                            I use the 10-14 Variable Pitch Lennox Diemaster II blades to cut stainless steel almost every day.

                            I find that the 10-14 is just fine for up to inch and a half round or so- much bigger, like if you are cutting 2" or 3" diameter material, then you might want to go down to a coarser tooth.

                            I run two of the little Jet 4x6 bandsaws with these blades on them, and we cut everything from 1/8" plate to 1" round all day with em.

                            These blades will last a long time IF you dont break a tooth, either by dropping the blade on the workpiece, or, if hand cutting, by pushing too hard. Break a tooth, and they all start to rip out, and the blade is basically toast. I buy 3 at a time, 2 or 3 times a year, and have been for 15 years now- and these are the best compromise of speed, price, and utility for cutting small (under 2") stainless.

                            I usually run em dry, but will add a cutting oil manually on bigger diameter pieces- over 1", usually.

                            I just get mine from MSC- not the cheapest, but quick and reliable, and I live long way from anyplace I could buy one in person.

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