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  • cutting a cylinder

    I often sell my scrap geysers to the local scrapyard. He says he gets a minimum of 15 a day. These geysers are about 400mm in diameter and about 1.2m long after they have had all the insulation stripped off them.
    They then have to cut these geysers up into smaller pieces so that they can be packed in a shipping container so that they can be sent to india to be melted down and then probably sent back to us in steel pipes or whatever.
    They use a mixture of oxygen and propane gas to cut these tanks in half lengthwise and then crosswise and it seems like an expensive and time consuming way to do this.This is africa so if you had to see how its done you would understand. The guy wears no eye protection and the flames are flying all over the place You have to be carefull not to park your car to close when dropping off or it will get a shower of hot molten metal.
    Does anyone have a more elegant solution on how to cut steel tanks up that is cheaper and less messy?This company has many branches and the foreman reckons if it would save them money they would consider a different system. Some thoughts are maybe a big cut off saw but it would have to be huge and maybe to slow. Maybe a big horizontal bandsaw. Would plasma work? I know nothing about plasma Does plasma use gas. Maybe a big press. What type of press could squash a clinder that is about 1.6mm thick and capped on both ends
    thanks eugene

  • #2
    Hmmm, these are probably all daft ideas for one reason or another...

    Are these cylinder intact? If so maybe a vacuum pump?

    If this is a scrap yard how about a derrick with a block of concrete and a truck or tractor to pull it up and drop on a pile of cylinders?

    Here is a really daft one.... Stick a threaded rod through with a plate on the end and a big nut then turn the shaft with some low speed high torque power source, maybe a truck engine and gearbox on a stand (you did say this is a scrap yard?). You would end up with a nice concertinaed metal pancake.


    Does the yard have a bucket loader? If so put something heavy in the bucket and use the weight of the bucket to crush the cylinders.

    I dont know the gauge of the metal but if you dont mind the noise a hand reciprocating saw with a metal cutting blade springs to mind, cut the ends off then stomp on the remaining bit.

    We used to cut oil drums on the farm using an axe like blade with a wooden handle, one person held the handle while another struck the back of the blade with a wooden maul, that was suprisingly quick.

    As for a press, I assume the requirement is for a fairly long travel but not a great pressure, only a few tons but travel of a metre or more... thats not the sort of press you would usually find in industry.

    With room to spare and labour available I think you could make a press using one of those high lift jacks beloved by the 4WD fraternity. That would not cost much to build.

    South Africa has/had a lot of sheep, I am not suggesting a wool press would be suitable 'as is' but the jacks on the sides of some types might be ideal.

    John
    Last edited by The Artful Bodger; 03-07-2011, 03:21 PM.

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    • #3
      It is my understanding that the cheapest way to cut steel with a torch is gasoline/oxygen torches. Useless for welding at all, but cuts like mad.

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      • #4
        The guage is about 1.6mm thick. I use your idea of the ax on copper geysers using a panga but the steel would be a bit difficult . If it was upsized it could be a good idea Kind of like a big shear. He was actually thinking of dropping a big block of concrete on it by using his forklift. I have a sneaky suspicion the inherant strength of a cylindrical shape would make crushing this difficult. Unless the end caps could be taken off A vacuum wouldnt work because all of them have been scrapped due to rust holes ( pin hole) sometimes hardlly noticable. Your idea of squashing them with a gearbox setup leads me to think if one could not make a heavy duty vice that is operational through hydraulics. Wish I had the ability of some of our members to cad draw because that would probly work . It could be done with a massive fixed jaw and maybe two rams moving a loose jaw to squash it. Wonder if there are any forums with engineers on it who could give more info on what kind of power would be needed to make an oversize can crusher.

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        • #5
          Find a steam roller to run em over!

          Plasmas not a bad idea. There is some consumables however... Some do use compressed air. Others bottled gas.

          Oxy/fuel (Gasoline, Propane, etc) is a pertty decent and fast way to cut em.
          Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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          • #6
            Make one of these:



            Should be ideal for taking the ends off!

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            • #7
              "I often sell my scrap geysers to the local scrapyard."

              What's a geyser?
              Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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              • #8
                Does he have a car crusher? If so, once the ends are removed just crush them.

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                • #9
                  Does he have a bulldozer? Run that over them.

                  I was puzzled too, Google search led me to hot water heaters.
                  Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                  ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by winchman
                    "I often sell my scrap geysers to the local scrapyard."

                    What's a geyser?

                    Another name for a calefont.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by winchman
                      "I often sell my scrap geysers to the local scrapyard."

                      What's a geyser?
                      glad I wasnt the only guy wondering that

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                      • #12
                        I work on compressed gas cylinders for a living and this is what we do. Make sure the vessel is empty and purged. Drill a 1" hole in each end. Send it to the shredder in the local yard. My local guys shreds more than 10,000 cylinders a year just from me. These range from small handheld propane cylinders up to 2500 PSI 1/2" thick industrial gas cylinders.

                        http://www.ssiworld.com/applications...ations2-en.htm

                        SSI makes the shredder and someone said the electric motor is 3000 HP. I know they remove the side of the building to get the armature out of the motor for repair and you can stand up where the armature once was.

                        A fullsize Chevy van will be shredded in 20 seconds including the motor, axle, and frame rails.

                        Go to the watch it shred link on their site or U tube for a demo.

                        P/R

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                        • #13
                          You guys in the states speak funny english. I was on holiday in Hawaii when two very pretty girls broke down in their car. I tried to help them so I asked if they ran out of petrol. They looked at me puzzled and then asked if I meant gas. Then I asked if they could open the bonnet and they asked if I meant the hood.
                          I thought it might be the battery was dead so I asked if they could press the hooter.
                          They asked if I meant the horn. I was starting to think this was going to be a long day when thankfully the highway patrol rocked up to help. In my country you could be lying half dead outside your car and no one will bother to stop and help you. Its just to dangerous

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                          • #14
                            Get one of these http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MaHg-q0_VXQ Its pretty freaking amazing what you can destroy with it. I have cut up 6" heavy wall steel pipe like cutting string with one.

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                            • #15
                              Visit this site with care and caution. Right after I watched a video, I got a Window message "Internet Explorer has stopped working" just as I clicked to cancel, I remembered *something* about the message being associated with a virus . I went to shut down and the computer indicating that it was installing an update. I immediately pulled the plug.

                              Lost some of my cookies and can't access my e-mail.

                              What's up?



                              Originally posted by pressurerelief
                              I work on compressed gas cylinders for a living and this is what we do. Make sure the vessel is empty and purged. Drill a 1" hole in each end. Send it to the shredder in the local yard. My local guys shreds more than 10,000 cylinders a year just from me. These range from small handheld propane cylinders up to 2500 PSI 1/2" thick industrial gas cylinders.

                              hjjp://www.ssiworld.com/applications/applications2-en.htn (gimped the url to make it non functional here)

                              SSI makes the shredder and someone said the electric motor is 3000 HP. I know they remove the side of the building to get the armature out of the motor for repair and you can stand up where the armature once was.

                              A fullsize Chevy van will be shredded in 20 seconds including the motor, axle, and frame rails.

                              Go to the watch it shred link on their site or U tube for a demo.

                              P/R
                              Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
                              ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

                              Comment

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