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homemade indexible lathe insert holders

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  • homemade indexible lathe insert holders

    I wish I was more computer savvy. I want to make some simple lathe toolholders but cant find what I saved on my computer. There was a site that had some cad drawings of some toolholders showing the angles and measurements and photos. Does anyone recall this. We dont have a harbour freight like you guys and dont even have ebay so I cant buy cheap inserts.
    I bought a small 9mm insert today and it cost 14$. Its for aluminium. For a small 13x40 lathe what insert tools do you think would be a minimum requirement?
    I am trying to make 7 moulds for a dip mould .Its a handle grip for a wheelchair
    thanks eugene

  • #2
    If you have trouble finding things on a computer (and it's a PC) I very highly recommend Agent Ransack. I'm forever dipping in to that search interface looking for things I know I just had someplace (and after 34 years of programming. This problem isn't one of savvitude .)

    As for drawings for a homemade indexible tool holder, I can't help you sorry. But I'm sure going to be paying attention to this thread
    ----
    Proud machining permanoob since September 2010

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    • #3
      No plans but a couple of pictures.

      CCMT inserts are really easy to make holders for as all that is required is a straight cut across the end of some appropriately sized bar-stock-

      The only caveat is that it is best to drill and tap the hole before you mill the recess.

      The "chinese triangles" are from a local toolstore and where actually surprisingly ok for the price(5/8" to a side).

      Didn't take much care in making them but they are(like me) crude but effective


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      • #4
        Was it this maybe?

        http://www.metalwebnews.com/howto/to...oolholder.html

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        • #5
          Here are some pics of the boring bars I made, they take a 1/4" IC insert.

          JL....................


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          • #6
            Originally posted by plunger
            For a small 13x40 lathe what insert tools do you think would be a minimum requirement?
            thanks eugene
            ZERO insert tools are required for most operations. The exception is pre-hardened materials. Carbide inserts can speed up the rate you take material off by a factor of three, if you have the horsepower. But a properly ground HSS tool bit is MUCH cheaper, and more flexible.

            DJ

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            • #7
              Originally posted by mechanicalmagic
              ZERO insert tools are required for most operations. The exception is pre-hardened materials. Carbide inserts can speed up the rate you take material off by a factor of three, if you have the horsepower. But a properly ground HSS tool bit is MUCH cheaper, and more flexible.

              DJ
              I have to agree with this statement completely.

              But like "mechanicalmagic" stated, sometimes, for certain materials, carbide inserts do serve a purpose.

              Had a job the other day that justufied inserts. So although I did not have any plans I threw this one together made out of a piece of 7/16" keystock.
              One end cut for a positive insert, the other end for a negitive insert.
              Not completely done yet but it should give some ideas.









              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

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              • #8
                Originally posted by plunger
                I bought a small 9mm insert today and it cost 14$.
                If you're willing to spend that on a consumable insert, why would you bother to make holders that cost less than that (unless those cheap import sets are totally worthless)?

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                • #9
                  If you are making holders for inserts do not bury the inset all the way into the holder.

                  All unused edges MUST be above the holder because vibration will fracture the unused edges and when you come to turn the insert round it will be chipped and unusable.

                  When you drill the mounting stud mark it out and with a punch move it slightly to wares the back or location edges. This will ensure that when you tighten down it will push the inset hard into the back or location faces to make it snug and also to ensure that the offsets are the same when the tip is changed.

                  Another nice move but not written in stone is to use a tapered end mill so the taper of the pocket matches the insert to get a snug fit.
                  .

                  Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                  • #10
                    Those some nice bars Joe Lee, looks like something the dentist would use!

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                    • #11
                      Hi Plunger


                      Have a look here this may help....
                      You can also buy HSS inserts so you can have the best of both..

                      regards Bert

                      http://www.bedair.org/Carbide/tool.html

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mechanicalmagic
                        ZERO insert tools are required for most operations. The exception is pre-hardened materials. Carbide inserts can speed up the rate you take material off by a factor of three, if you have the horsepower. But a properly ground HSS tool bit is MUCH cheaper, and more flexible.

                        DJ
                        To each his/her own. I find good quality carbide inserts dirt cheap, even cheaper than good quality HHS blanks in many cases. JT Supply of Mentor Ohio sent out an e-mail today with thousands of inserts for $2.50 each, all kinds of different ones. I have plenty of HSS tool bits. I have lots of inserts because I like them, and believe me when I say I can rip material off at far more than 3x times the rate of HSS. And carbide inserts do not necessarily need lots of HP to be useful. Some do, some don't, it all depends upon the insert's top form geometry and material being cut.

                        I can imagine that if I'd used HSS to cut this 316SS motorcycle axle, I'd still be working on it. Instead, it was taken from it's 2" diameter (x 12.5" long) down to 20mm, threaded 3/4 -16 UNF and done in under 45 minutes.

                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eNnK4exD3zg

                        Not everyone has 5 "Taiwanese" HP (about 4.2 real HP), but most have 1200rpm and these cuts didn't use anywhere near that HP anyhow. I can well imagine that I might have had to resharpen a HSS tool several times during the course of turning this. When I was done, the insert I used still looked nearly new. Lots of life remaining. Cost? About $6 for 4 edges = <$1.50 per edge. I didn't even use up one. My time was worth more than the fiddy cents I probably used.

                        Cost is relative. Even some home shops want a little bit of productivity. I do.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by PixMan
                          To each his/her own. I find good quality carbide inserts dirt cheap, even cheaper than good quality HHS blanks in many cases. JT Supply of Mentor Ohio sent out an e-mail today with thousands of inserts for $2.50 each, all kinds of different ones.
                          Perhaps you would like to answer the OP's original question, about the "required inserts" for a 13x40 lathe. Keep in mind that he is in Durbin, SOUTH AFRICA, and most US tool vendors won't bother to ship there.

                          DJ

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by PixMan
                            To each his/her own. I find good quality carbide inserts dirt cheap, even cheaper than good quality HHS blanks in many cases. JT Supply of Mentor Ohio sent out an e-mail today with thousands of inserts for $2.50 each, all kinds of different ones. .
                            The cost from a total disbursements view isn't insert cost vs hss blank cost; it shoul be 30 inserts vs 1 hss blank. That hss blank gets sharpened over and over. If you're covering overhead, sure carbide can remove more material per hour, and I use both, but a straight up comparison of cost of one of each doesn't say much. I was turning 3" dia 4140 the other day, carbide all the way with 1/8" DOC an 20 thou chip, awesome, you'd spend days with hss....but that job's the exception. I'll use hss whenever i can for its superior economics - in terms of much lower total disbursements
                            .

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                            • #15
                              I use Rex 95 and other high cobalt or high tungsten bearing cutting tools in 316 and 304 SS all the time. I've found that it works very well if you keep the feed up where it should be.

                              Carbide has its place, but so does HSS. For aluminum, I think HSS would be a better choice for Plunger. Afterall, the aluminum is going to suck up most of the heat and a decent HSS (something with 8% cobalt or tungsten) isn't going to wear very fast at all in aluminum. You can run HSS very fast in Al without any trouble.

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