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  • craftsman drill press spindle

    Now I have really done it... I bent the spindle assy on my Craftsman Drill Press. (103.23131) Nobody needs to tell me that the sixty year old part in no longer available.

    What are my options?
    a) attempt to straighten the spindle. This will inherently weaken the part and make it prone to bending or breaking.

    b) turn down the spindle and put a new Jacobs taper on it. Or thread it for a different chuck.

    c) take the spindle to a real machinist and have a replacement made.

    Lesson learned?
    STOP MILLING WITH YOUR HEIRLOOM DRILL PRESS!!!

  • #2
    A friend did the same thing. A large spade bit jammed in the work and ........
    He disassembled the press and brought over the spindle. I marked the high spot in the spindle and put it on v blocks in the press and straightened it. Took a couple tries, but it came out pretty good. The shaft was then indicated in in my lathe with a steady rest at the chuck end and I took a few thousandths off the Jacobs taper to true it up to the spindle again.
    Runout in the press was checked and was extremely good. He's been using it with no problems for several years now....but he doesn't try to mill with it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Don't be too quick to write off parts availability. Couldn't see the pic but it sounds similar to my Katrina salvaged craftsman DP. Spindle rusted solid. I found a source for Sears parts (parts direct maybe?, I'll have to look). Very surprising almost all of the parts are available including spindle/bearings. I'll try to remember and post the source link when I get a chance.

      Cadwiz

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      • #4
        Hello Miner49r,
        I have a Craftsman drill press that was used in a paint lab for 30yrs to stir and mix fiberglass resins ( must of set up a time or two) and paints. When I got it it had a run-out of ? ( a lot ) and didn't drill a straight hole. Thought it was the chuck, bought a new one still had a problem removed the spindle and took it to a tool grinder and he trued it up to within .0001. I got new bearings from the local bearing house the best price versus a retailer of "Craftsman Parts" it works like a champ, and now the holes are true and come out in the middle on both sides of the material I am drilling.
        My suggestion is fix it if at all possible. You don't tell us how bent it is but between the press idea and grinding it I think you should get back in business with little outlay of money. Good luck and let us know how it comes out.

        Chris
        Mr. Fixit in the family

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        • #5
          Some one made that one . Copy it and make a new one . Use ETD 150 material are 4140 HT. Machine it between centers it is not hard to do . done it many times . Drill press spindles, milling machine spindles and any thing similar Even a grinder spindle are two.
          Last edited by lane; 03-08-2011, 08:11 PM.
          Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
          http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
          http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Miner49r
            Now I have really done it... I bent the spindle assy on my Craftsman Drill Press. (103.23131) Nobody needs to tell me that the sixty year old part in no longer available.

            What are my options?
            a) attempt to straighten the spindle. This will inherently weaken the part and make it prone to bending or breaking.

            b) turn down the spindle and put a new Jacobs taper on it. Or thread it for a different chuck.

            c) take the spindle to a real machinist and have a replacement made.

            Lesson learned?
            STOP MILLING WITH YOUR HEIRLOOM DRILL PRESS!!!
            dont give up i straightened the shaft on my planer using the flame method it worked beautifully my planer is back in operation and it did,nt cost me a dime, just a bit of acetylene if you want details go to how to and search flame straightening good luck jack

            Comment


            • #7
              Unless you bent it to a right angle it probably hasn't and won't weaken noticeably. I would certainly attempt to straighten first, failing that attempt to turn a concentric taper or thread on the end for a new chuck mount. Only if all of that failed would I search for a replacement part.

              After all, if straightening or machining fail, it was already broken.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for all the advice and encouragement. I will put a dial indicater to it this weekend. I had completely forgotten about flame straightening. That and indexing the high spot and using pressure from the mill table should work.
                I'll keep you posted.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Here it is... spindle run out:
                  .019" at spindle above the taper
                  .032" at narrow end of taper
                  .062" at chuck (as pictured)

                  Certainly not a right angle, but enough to put a cramp in my day.

                  http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/5519250288/

                  http://www.flickr.com/photos/6049699...n/photostream/

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                  • #10
                    With a pair of v-blocks, a hyd press, and a little patience, I bet that spindle can be saved.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      OK Guys,
                      I got it apart with the exception of the thrust collar for the chuck. It appears there is a roll pin in a blind hole holding it to the spindle. The only way I can see to remove the pin is by drilling. Sure wish I had a drill press.

                      I suppose that the thrust collar should be removed before I send it out for staightening... grrrrrrrrrrrrr!!!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Miner49r
                        OK Guys,
                        I got it apart with the exception of the thrust collar for the chuck. It appears there is a roll pin in a blind hole holding it to the spindle. The only way I can see to remove the pin is by drilling. Sure wish I had a drill press.

                        I suppose that the thrust collar should be removed before I send it out for staightening... grrrrrrrrrrrrr!!!
                        I have a collar on my rockwell. I put a bar in the chuck hole and a spanner wrench in the collar and worked it back and forth until it freed up enough to unthread it.
                        Rob

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                        • #13
                          I think that collar is supposed to stay attached to the chuck. The end of the spindle should look like this:

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by dfw5914
                            I think that collar is supposed to stay attached to the chuck. The end of the spindle should look like this:

                            That's quite substantial....

                            The Walker-Turner and others I looked at may not have had the same JT33 on it, because they had a substantial neck-down above the chuck. They were "stated" in some cases to be for the collar type chuck, but they did not look like that.

                            I would not be particularly worried about that size spindle bending.

                            The ones I saw were definitely NOT like that. From what I see there, the others were just spindles with a built-in Jacobs taper. And not a large one, either. With the neck-down to perhaps 60% of the big end of the taper, it is no wonder they bent.
                            1601

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

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                            • #15
                              This is on a Craftsman "Heavy Duty" 17" drill press (113.213873) I bought new in the early eighties.

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