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Yet another ball turner...

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  • Yet another ball turner...

    I know, theres a gazillion variations of em, but --- I've got pictures! And since we've had quite a lot of new members in the last while, theres probably some who will like.

    I've made 4 of these things previously, starting with Steve Bedairs version several years ago, but never hit on all the features I thought I would like to have - up & over cutting, compact size, and mainly, tool post mountable. I seldom make just a ball, I often need a ball crank handle, and to make the 3 separate connected balls means changing out cutters and with the compound mount versions thats a pain. This one seems to address my wants the best - so far!

    This version is from one of HSM's advertisers "Tall Grass Tools" (and an active contributor here on the forum). He offers it in a kit or just the plans. I chose the plans because I had plenty of scrap yard material to construct it.


    If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

  • #2
    Would you be kind enough to post an action shot, I just do not understand how it works.

    Comment


    • #3
      Squirrel,
      The cutter is a tangential tool, it cuts on the end rather than the side. When mounted the tool points straight across the ways and the axle and dovetail slide allow that pointed finger to swing in an arc up over the top of the workpiece. Using the leadscrew under the dial to move the slide down, the radius of the arc is gradually whittled down to leave the ball you want.

      I've experimented a little and you can also round off corners such as a 1/8" corner round on a 1" diameter piece, or do some concave radii with a little jury rigging. It derives from a Radford design published several years ago.
      .
      "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

      Comment


      • #4
        Would you be kind enough to post an action shot, I just do not understand how it works
        .

        I did take this one shot when I was doing the test run on it - hope it and TGTools explanation helps.


        If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

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        • #5
          Bill that looks beautifully made - nicely done. Can you tell us about the finish? one of the cold blues or a hot dunk in oil?
          .

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          • #6
            Ball Turner

            Kudos for a nice project Bill! Did you make the adjusting screw with the numbers and graduations?

            Comment


            • #7
              Can you tell us about the finish? one of the cold blues or a hot dunk in oil?
              Thats a closely guarded family secret Mcgyver!

              Well, okay, this one time...

              (whispering...) its Brownells version of cold blacking!! which I like better'n any I've tried.

              Its critical to get the part CLEAN!! I've tried about every method, lacquer thinner, mineral spirits, soap & water, etc and by far, the best method I've found is to bead blast and immediately apply the stuff, being careful of fingerprints, and even then sometimes a piece (usually a piece of 'unknownium' from the scrap yard) will just not take the finish. One of the pieces of this ball turner was very stubborn and it took 3-4 applications before it took.

              Toolguy, yes I did the hash marks and numbering...
              If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

              Comment


              • #8
                Sweet....!
                www.neufellmachining.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks for posting this Bill.
                  I've seriously been contemplating building a ball turner myself and I haven't because of the exact reasons you gave as to what you would like to see in one.
                  This looks like the one with the features I want.

                  Very professional looking project Bill, it came out very nice indeed.
                  And yes, the cold black does look good!

                  PS,
                  Haven't I seen a variation of this design using a boring head?
                  Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                  Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

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                  • #10
                    Great job!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You may already have the guts for one of these in the shape of the universal import boring head.



                      All that's needed is a shank, block and handle.
                      .

                      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                      Comment


                      • #12
                        This is really the most diverse ball turner I have seen so far and easiest to find the centerline of your work, only one question how rigid is it?
                        What is the DOC without getting chatter marks?
                        If you are using violence and it does not work, You are not using enough or it is upside down.
                        You can always just EDM it...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Has anyone done the math to set one of these up in conjunction with a taper attachment and make a balanced crank in one go?
                          Jim

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                          • #14
                            You may already have the guts for one of these in the shape of the universal import boring head.
                            Thanks John, that is what I was thinking of.

                            Westline has the same thought as I about rigidity.
                            It does seem like an awful large amount of leverage exists between the cutting tool's edge and the tool post, in either example.
                            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Remember that the main cutting force operates laterally, not vertically. The tool tends to be pressed toward the operator, seating the toolholder into it's thrust bearing. Vertical forces, those that would bend the tool, are reduced by limiting the depth of cut.

                              It's not a roughing tool. Cutting a sphere consists of a series of finishing cuts. It works well and the design has been around for a long time. Mine is a commercial tool by Jabus Engineering in the UK (no longer trading, as far as I can find).

                              Mark

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