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  • Rockwell drill press chuck removal

    this is a photo of my new Rockwell 15" vari 15-655 model 20.

    more specifically, the drill chuck. the item just above the chuck itself looks like it might keep the chuck from being removed. at least I can't figure it out. I have looked for a slot where I might insert one of those triangular pieces of metal which would remove the chuck, but it doesn't seem to have one.

    any help is appreciated in how I can remove the chuck?

    thanks

    Rob

    Rob

  • #2
    Originally posted by rmuell01
    I have looked for a slot where I might insert one of those triangular pieces of metal which would remove the chuck, but it doesn't seem to have one.
    Did you lower the quill first, before looking?

    Comment


    • #3
      Is that a collar above the chuck or the spindle?
      If it's a collar it may be threaded.
      Unscrew it to drop the chuck.

      Comment


      • #4
        What brand of chuck is it?

        Joe
        If you can't fix it with duct tape or a hammer it's an electrical problem.

        Comment


        • #5
          It looks like the Jacobs 633C style. That should be a threaded collar right above the chuck. Use a spanner wrench and turn it to the left and the chuck should fall out.

          Joe
          If you can't fix it with duct tape or a hammer it's an electrical problem.

          Comment


          • #6
            I aggree. 33 male taper on the spindle. Collar on the chuck pulls the two together.

            Comment


            • #7
              That isthe exact same as the one on my Sears drill press.
              And yes the above is right. The thread is a righ hand one and a pin
              "spanner" is what it atkes. Hold the pully and wack the end of the
              spanner it'll come loose and just spin it off.
              ...lew...

              Comment


              • #8
                Time flies doesn't it?

                There was a time ALL higher quality 14"-15" drill presses used this type chuck mounting. Both Jacobs and Supreme made the chucks.

                The chucks were 1/2" capacity and could be used for light milling/routing if needed without the worry of the chuck flying loose.

                Comment


                • #9
                  it took a bar in the chuck and a pin spanner to get it loose. Now.........
                  the question remains, what does it take to replace this with the capability to install a morse taper? or do I have to put a collar on every chuck I want to install?

                  Rob
                  Rob

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rmuell01
                    it took a bar in the chuck and a pin spanner to get it loose. Now.........
                    the question remains, what does it take to replace this with the capability to install a morse taper? or do I have to put a collar on every chuck I want to install?

                    Rob

                    Rockwell made a #2 Morse nose piece that fits in place of your collared chuck. Might be kind of hard to find though, it must be 30 years or so ago since they were offered. I have one, but would want a small fortune for it.

                    You can put any #33 taper chuck on your spindle, the locking collar is not necessary. AFAIK, the only one that's commonly available with the clocking collar is the Jacobs 633.

                    What is it you don't like about the current setup? In a small dp I consider what you have as the ultimate.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by rmuell01
                      the question remains, what does it take to replace this with the capability to install a morse taper? Rob
                      Some Delta/Rockwell drills, could be ordered with a Morse Taper spindle instead of a 33 taper stub. There might be a parts manual on OWWM dot com for your drill which would determine that. You drill will only go to about 1/2-5/8" in steel. Its meant to be a light duty drillpress. If you want a larger capacity drill with a MT socket, better to buy a camelback style drill.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DR
                        What is it you don't like about the current setup? In a small dp I consider what you have as the ultimate.
                        I have looked at several drill presses with this setup. Walker-Turner and others.

                        In a number of cases, the taper on the end of the spindle was bent*, causing the chuck to wabble more-or-less severely and making the drill press essentially unusable aside from very basic hole-poking. Naturally in those cases the presses were otherwise among the better looking units, but the owners blew off the bend when pricing.

                        probably they were better looking because they hadn't been used much since the bend, and nobody could stand to scrap a "good" press that "just" needs a spindle. 'Course they never replaced it, and now 30 years later spindles are even less available.

                        Yes you can bend it back, maybe, but it will likely always wabble after that, you may just reduce it a bit.

                        Bent spindles are less common in morse socket types. The very thin "neck" often present just above the taper on the type with the JT ends is a weak point.

                        J

                        *
                        On-point example, right here.

                        http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=46942
                        Last edited by J Tiers; 03-11-2011, 08:41 AM.
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by DR
                          Rockwell made a #2 Morse nose piece that fits in place of your collared chuck.

                          What is it you don't like about the current setup? In a small dp I consider what you have as the ultimate.
                          Oh I like the setup. NP with that. It's just that I've set up my shop for MT with my previous drill press. I have some other jacobs and Albrecht chucks I'd like to use w/o converting.

                          Rob
                          Rob

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by J Tiers
                            I have looked at several drill presses with this setup. Walker-Turner and others.

                            In a number of cases, the taper on the end of the spindle was bent*, causing the chuck to wabble more-or-less severely and making the drill press essentially unusable aside from very basic hole-poking. Naturally in those cases the presses were otherwise among the better looking units, but the owners blew off the bend when pricing.

                            probably they were better looking because they hadn't been used much since the bend, and nobody could stand to scrap a "good" press that "just" needs a spindle. 'Course they never replaced it, and now 30 years later spindles are even less available.

                            Yes you can bend it back, maybe, but it will likely always wabble after that, you may just reduce it a bit.

                            Bent spindles are less common in morse socket types. The very thin "neck" often present just above the taper on the type with the JT ends is a weak point.

                            J

                            *
                            On-point example, right here.

                            http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=46942

                            This system (locking collar chucks) was used on Rockwell, W-T, Atlas/Craftsman and a whole bunch more higher end DP's from the 1940's up till the junk invasion. How wrong could they be?

                            There's nothing inherently wrong with it. Other than stupid users. Used within the capacity of the machines, generally a max 1/2" hole in soft steel, they'll last forever. How do you bend a spindle using the machine within it's capacity?

                            Granted, the Morse taper imports may be stiffer spindle-wise, but how many complaints have you read about them? Ever tried used a tapping head with one (oops, it fell out on retraction)?

                            All in all, the locking collar is by far the best solution for bit holding in a light duty DP. Light duty being 14"-15".

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              It's a good idea, it isn't "wrong", but it WILL bend, as evidenced by all the ones that have bent.

                              I wasn't aware that the chucks have a part that locks in with the collar.... if that is true, that's a *huge* "demerit", since I would not suppose those have been made for many years.

                              The ones I have seen may have had a collar for removal. Most had no chuck, and the collar was lost on some.

                              There is no morse taper that is any good that falls out..... it must have dings etc. I had one chinese press that everything fell out of. When I looked, I found that the socket was never ground, it was only rough-turned. Good thing I got it very used........
                              1601

                              Keep eye on ball.
                              Hashim Khan

                              Comment

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