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OT: 220v question

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  • OT: 220v question

    a pal of mine is having trouble with his 220v dryer. It worked at his house this morning, and it does not work at his daughters house now.

    The previous owner of his daughter's house did everything wrong or slipshod.

    I'm suspecting his 220v isn't 200v. How can he verify that his power is correct? Each leg of the 220v when measured against ground should be 110v. What if he measures across both legs of the 220v with a volt meter?

    He says the machine just hums when he turns it on. Sounds to me like the motor is fighting itself, if that is possible, like both sides of his 220v are actually the same phase.

    He says it has a 220v breaker. I asked him to verify the box is of the 'alternating finger' type so the 220v breaker will do what you think.


    Ideas?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Tony Ennis
    a pal of mine is having trouble with his 220v dryer. It worked at his house this morning, and it does not work at his daughters house now.

    The previous owner of his daughter's house did everything wrong or slipshod.

    I'm suspecting his 220v isn't 200v. How can he verify that his power is correct? Each leg of the 220v when measured against ground should be 110v. What if he measures across both legs of the 220v with a volt meter?

    He says the machine just hums when he turns it on. Sounds to me like the motor is fighting itself, if that is possible, like both sides of his 220v are actually the same phase.

    He says it has a 220v breaker. I asked him to verify the box is of the 'alternating finger' type so the 220v breaker will do what you think.


    Ideas?
    Across the two hots, I'd suspect you would want to see 220/230/240v whatever that voltage may be.

    Is he sure the dryer works? A lot of times these problems are of a very simple nature...loose connection, etc. If he can trace wire directly to breaker, it would be evident what the voltage is.
    I bury my work

    Comment


    • #3
      Open the dryer door and make sure the drum turns by hand.I had one bounce out of kilter in a move once,a quick turn of the drum and it clunked back into groove.

      A "Wiggy" will tell you alot about a circuit,they have them at Homedespot and Lowdown's-

      http://www.google.com/products/catal...d=0CCkQ8wIwAA#
      I just need one more tool,just one!

      Comment


      • #4
        A volt meter across both hot legs should read 220-240 volts. Also check each leg to ground (in the ground pin) to insure a well grounded circuit. Almost all dryers use 110 volts for the controls, and have always used the ground as a neutral. All new installations are required by National Electric Code to be four wire now; two hot legs, a ground leg, and a neutral.

        If the electric is verified to be 220-240 volts, properly grounded, then do what wierdscience has suggested, look for a mechanical bind.

        Comment


        • #5
          He's verified 220v across the hot legs and 110v from each hot to ground/neutral.

          He took the dryer to a repair shop and it worked there.

          He doesn't have a 4th wire/different ground/neutral. Is it possible the dryer won't work without a separate wire for each? I was under the assumption they were the same thing.

          Comment


          • #6
            You can have 110v to ground on both sides of the plug but NOT 220v. If the power is coming from the same leg in the pannel then you will only have 2 lines of 110v. Take your meter and check that you HAVE 220v from both sides of the plug. If you have 110v to ground, but nothing when you go across the the plug then the power is coming from the same leg. You also need the neutral from the pannel, as it lets the motor and controls run on 110v but the Heating element runs on 220v.

            Good luck.

            Rob

            Comment


            • #7
              Measure the voltage under load, see if it still reads 220V across both.

              Comment


              • #8
                If the dryer is set up for 4 wire, and you put it on a three wire circuit, you may have to bridge Neutral and Ground in the dryer. If it's applicable, there should be a circuit and adjustment procedure labeled in the back of the dryer.


                Look for the stupid stuff - loose wires... bad connections. If the branch wires are aluminum, make sure you (or the prior guys) use anti-oxident paste on the terminals.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tony Ennis
                  He's verified 220v across the hot legs and 110v from each hot to ground/neutral.

                  He took the dryer to a repair shop and it worked there.

                  He doesn't have a 4th wire/different ground/neutral. Is it possible the dryer won't work without a separate wire for each? I was under the assumption they were the same thing.
                  sounds to me like the plug in the box is defective

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Neutral and ground are most certainly not the same thing and not interchangeable. While a dryer or other machine might run using the ground as a neutral it would be very dangerous. If it does not run you may have an even more dangerous situation, no ground.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jack3140
                      sounds to me like the plug in the box is defective
                      You'd think......

                      if he has a different plug on the dryer NOW, in order to plug into the 4 wire system at the new place, ARE YOU SURE IT'S WIRED RIGHT?

                      if he didn't need to put a new plug on, double check the outlet, to be sure that things are on the pins they are supposed to be....

                      I keep thinking about that statement:

                      "The previous owner of his daughter's house did everything wrong or slipshod."

                      That sounds like a very possible cause of all this trouble.

                      The chassis could even be hot on the thing... I'd be VERY careful if the wiring is that bad......
                      1601

                      Keep eye on ball.
                      Hashim Khan

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If the wiring in the house is that suspect, I would run a wire to a known good ground and check the plug from that. Check to all three or four pins. Two (the hots) should show 110/115 Volts and the other one (ground) or two (ground and neutral) should show zero or just 1 or 2 Volts at most. If you have anything different, call an electrician.

                        And yes, do check across the two hots with a load in place. A couple of 110 Volt light bulbs wired in SERIES would do. Or the dryer itself. It should read 220 Volts under load.
                        Paul A.
                        SE Texas

                        Make it fit.
                        You can't win and there IS a penalty for trying!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          do check across the two hots with a load in place
                          What's the significance of checking it under load? What should it show?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Tony Ennis
                            What's the significance of checking it under load? What should it show?
                            It will show up a poor/corroded connection upstream of the test point.
                            I'm not sure it's a good idea to use the drier as a load though. if the motor is trying to start with low voltage you might damage it.
                            Mike

                            My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Like I said earlier -if the wiring to the receptable box is aluminum, and the connections were made without anti-oxident, you can have a high resistance or loose connection. Putting it under load will show this. Same at the breaker end.


                              I pull the box and panel cover off, and check both ends.

                              Comment

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