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carbon-steel razor developping bow

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  • carbon-steel razor developping bow

    My straight razor has developped a bow after a few stroppings - I have no idea how this has developped, but I did not purchase it this way, pics comming shortly.

  • #2
    Now its a radius shaver.
    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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    • #3
      This makes it problematic for creating a handle for it, since the blade has to fold into it, but the bow makes it convenient for shaving. It's concave on one side, convex on the other, tried it on various straight edges. Could I straighten it somehow? I don't understand how this happened in the first place.
      Last edited by Elninio; 03-13-2011, 06:00 PM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Elninio
        My straight razor has developped a bow after a few stroppings - I have no idea how this has developped,
        I would blame it on high speed stropping and over heating one side, try flame straightening
        On a more serious note, a custom curved handle would be cool.

        Steve

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        • #5
          You could make the handle (the receiver) to match the blade. Seems you will have to employ creative thinking when fabricating the curves. You will then have the expertise to readily make another as the curvature possibly increases with time. Oh No!

          I'm curious for everyone's theory as to how the present state of the razor came about.

          Edit in: Doctor Demo didn't ask me to repeat him.
          Last edited by Deja Vu; 03-13-2011, 06:24 PM.
          John M...your (un)usual basement dweller

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          • #6
            Steve, my OCD wouldn't allow it.

            But on more serious note, do you really think the heating would have caused it? I'm stropping slowly, there's no way it reach the yield point. My thumb is bigger than the width of the blade, it thermoregulates it. Since I've been stropping it without a handle on, I have to hold it by the body.

            Deja Vu, I was hoping to make the pocket that the blade folds into with my shaper. I'm afraid that heating and bending the finished handle may make it brittle enough to crack in the long run, I have experience with bending bicycle brake levers and having them crack. Also it's challenging to guess the temperature of aluminium as its heating since it doesn't turn shades of red like steels do.
            Last edited by Elninio; 03-13-2011, 06:30 PM.

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            • #7
              All straight rasor`s with out handles do that. The handle keeps them straight.
              How I know I have a few from my gram paw that are at least 100 years old . the handles had broken over the years and the blades no show a bow like yours. Make the handles first so you can put the blades in.
              Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
              http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
              http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

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              • #8
                Id wonder about stresses. Do you sharpen both sides equaly?
                Removing more material from one side then the other of a pre stressed steel can cause it to bend.

                Sorta a vauge stab in the dark as I know little about this, But could it be stress imparted by sharpening? (Work hardening?)

                Was the steel origionaly hot or cold rolled? Cold rolled is well known to bow/bend as you take the work hardened skin off.
                Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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                • #9
                  lane, you have the evidence so it is hard to deny, but I must insist that this is not the case (but you could be right, and probably so). The handles are flimsy, they exert no force on the blade itself. If this is the case then I can expect it to bend back in time. Also, there are razors that are made not to have handles, those would expire pretty fast. It could be a combination of stropping and shaving that bowed it.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Black_Moons
                    Id wonder about stresses. Do you sharpen both sides equaly?
                    Removing more material from one side then the other of a pre stressed steel can cause it to bend.

                    Sorta a vauge stab in the dark as I know little about this, But could it be stress imparted by sharpening? (Work hardening?)

                    Was the steel origionaly hot or cold rolled? Cold rolled is well known to bow/bend as you take the work hardened skin off.
                    I tend to shave and sharpen one side more than the other. But how could this bend the material? It must have a really small elastic zone and low yield point. One thing I know for sure is, it is very brittle.

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                    • #11
                      Straight Razor

                      The top of those is so thick, I don't see how sharpening or stropping on the skinny blade could possibly have any effect. I think there are residual internal stresses left over from heat treating. Probably the only way to get it flat again is by some stress relief process. Maybe heat, maybe cryogenics, maybe vibration, etc.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Toolguy
                        The top of those is so thick, I don't see how sharpening or stropping on the skinny blade could possibly have any effect. I think there are residual internal stresses left over from heat treating. Probably the only way to get it flat again is by some stress relief process. Maybe heat, maybe cryogenics, maybe vibration, etc.
                        I wouldn't think so either, but it depends on how the stress-train graph changed for it during hardening. The blade is probably 100 years old, do you think residual stresses would have existed that long? I bought it only about a month ago, and it wasn't crooked. It would be some coincidence if those stresses came out of hibernation just now!

                        Edit: I'm starting to think you're right, that would explain why the toe is sticking up too. But it is stick up in a different axes (up/down, not side to side). This would be an area of high stess since this is where it was cut, and heat accumulated the most. The fulcrum of the arch is where the blade joins the handle, and straight on either side of this. Maybe I should say 'Vee' instead of 'arch' ...
                        Last edited by Elninio; 03-13-2011, 10:57 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Has it been used in a fight in other than a "straight" bar?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tdmidget
                            Has it been used in a fight in other than a "straight" bar?
                            Perhaps. I bought it from a guy in germany, but it was manufactured in the United States. It's probably been to Japan too.

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                            • #15
                              Skin stresses

                              The blade is most likely a water or oil hard carbon steel which has fairly high hardness. The surface as quenched and tempered is in compression and if sharpened mostly on one side, then the compressive stress is relieved as material is removed. That side of the blade goes hollow. I wouldn't try to heat straighten it as that would destroy the temper. You could straighten to a small degree by supporting the concave side over two points and pressing between them on the convex side. You press slightly and check for curvature and repeat as needed.

                              The best method is to sharpen evenly on both sides.

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