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Projects take forever....is this common?

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  • #16
    I've really enjoyed the comments about this topic. Concerning Wade and Kap's recent entries, I've kind of learned over the years that, while you should always give it your best shot, the greatest enemy of "good" is "better."

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    • #17
      I AGREE WITH KAP, MAKE IT AS GOOD AS NEEDS TO BE. MY BOSS WOULD HANG ME IF I TOOK AS MUCH TIME AS I WANTED FOR UNNEEDED PRECISION. SOMETHING ABOUT "TIME IS MONEY"
      <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by kap pullen:
      I'm not like you guys.
      For too many years what went out the door dictated what my family had to eat.
      I make it as good as it needs to be.
      That dosen't mean shoddy workmanship.
      Lifes too short. Too many projects in my mind to dally around.
      Balls to the wall, full speed ahead.
      Gotta go make chips.
      see ya!
      Kapullen
      </font>

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      • #18
        I have the same problems when I do my production work in the summers. Seems I go to the shop to work, I get the real wierd stuff. here is an example:

        Make 250 "bearings" on a CNC lathe(more than this than I will say.

        #1. Check the print get the tools.

        #2. Grind the inserts for the special width grooves.

        #3 Re-adjust the coolant hose to get in the groove

        #3A. ind the wrench to fit the metric fitting.

        #3B. Find out the fitting is neither metric or english, but a cobble job. Make a new wrench.

        #3C. Put in the new fitting, find out why it was a cobble job in the first place.

        #3D Make a new fitting

        #3E Cobble up an addition to the coolant hose.

        4 Make special gauges in the toolroom to fit the special profiles. Program profiles on the mill.

        5. Call engineering from the home company I work for, tell them that there is no way on earth or in the 4th dimension that you could make what they need, it was an optical illusion that the customer dreamed up while drinking.

        6. Call the customer, explain this, our engineer who never worked in a shop can't figure it.

        7. Get new print via e-mail.

        8. tell them (nicely) they need to convert it right next time, get next print one hour later.

        8. Find out they just wanted a 1" thru drilled hole in a 2" diameter piece of brass 1/2" thick, the material has now been changed from hasteloy, and the outer and inner profiles and grooves proved to be ineffective after all, thus the engineering changes.

        Make the parts in fifteen minutes. Time on card, 16 hours.

        It just does not work right all the time, even when you need it to make money.......
        CCBW, MAH

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        • #19
          Production is one thing - you have to do things the quickest way you can to make a profit.

          Your own projects is another story - part of the pleasure of the hobby is making something better than you can purchase (pride in workmanship gone ape****). Tools are a good example - if you make a tool for yourself going that extra 7 miles always puts a cheshire cat smile on your face when showing your "baby" off.

          I have to admit I have been forced to make things for contracts that I would never admit I made - even when the customer's expectations were greatly exceeded - it was still crap as far as I was concerned and I was embarrassed we made it (I made sure we never stamped our name in that stuff - by "accident" of course)

          [This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 03-15-2002).]

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