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O/T DC 3's

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  • O/T DC 3's

    I was just outside here in East Tn doing some spring yard work when I heard this roar coming from over the mountains, looking up I was treated to the sight of not one but three bright shinny DC 3's flying in V formation! They were at about 2000 ft and the sound of those six big radial engines could actually be felt as well as heard. When I went back inside my wife asked "what was that awful Racket out there"? RACKET? What racket? Hey watch your mouth woman, the sound of a gaggle of big ole, radial engines is NOT RACKET!

    Being a pilot and aviation buff I love to see these old birds any chance I get and getting to see three of them in pristine condition flying in formation was quite a thrill, can't help but wonder who they are and where they were headed?

  • #2
    That would have been a sight. When I was at CAF Socal last weekend they have one under restoration. There is of course the AA one at Smith museum at DFW and if you want to see them flying every week on TV tune into Ice Pilots NWT on satellite to seen the antics of Buffalo Air who use one on a sked every day.

    I hope you got some video.
    Dave

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    • #3
      rotary engines

      I love the sound of a rotary engine. Even the model engines at the NAMES show have that distinctive exhaust note. I was fortunate to get a ride on an 80 yr old Ford trimotor in Fort Wayne Ind.about 10 yrs ago. Took my son and grandson . First time in the air for my grandson. Awesome experience. Bob Fisher.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Bob Fisher
        I love the sound of a rotary engine. Even the model engines at the NAMES show have that distinctive exhaust note. I was fortunate to get a ride on an 80 yr old Ford trimotor in Fort Wayne Ind.about 10 yrs ago. Took my son and grandson . First time in the air for my grandson. Awesome experience. Bob Fisher.
        I got to ride a Ford Tri-Motor at Airventure a few years ago. That and a Bell 47. My 14 yo nephew and I flew my pacer up there and spent the week camping in the North 40. And an awesome week it was!!
        Tim

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        • #5
          Let's get it right, guys. A "rotary" engine is descriptive of the Mazda rotary, or Wankel engine. It also describes the Le Rhone Monosupe rotary engines, used in World War one Sopwith Camels and Fokker DR-1 Triplanes. The differnece between a rotary engine and a radial is that the rotary, for the most part, has it's crankshaft affixed to the firewall, the propeller is bolted to the crankcase and the whole engine rotates around the crank. A radial engine has it's cylinders arranged around the crankcase in a radial fashion, and thurns the crankshaft and propeller in a conventional way.

          BTW, "radial" engines sound way better than "rotaries".

          Rotary engines were not too popular in the US, but they loved them in Europe.
          No good deed goes unpunished.

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          • #6
            I realize that the DC-3s still flying have had a lot of upgrades, to not only the airframe, engines, and avionics, but you still have to have a lot of respect for an airplane that has been an icon of air transport since 1935!

            Although they are available now turbine powered, you can't beat the sound of a big old radial engine.

            Here ya go Radkins, just in case your wife missed it , here's a few low fly bys from a nice example at an air show in Iceland 2006.

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LyUJIC6I7ic

            Crank up the volume!
            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

            Location: British Columbia

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            • #7
              Got to hear some radilas last weekend

              Had a number of radila planes flying down in Brownsville TX last weekend. 2 Goonies, a B25, B26, Skyraider, Beach D18 and a 1940 WACO UPF 7 that was much modified.

              Unfortunately the WACO had engine problems and the pilot and his wife (Wing walker) were injured. Please keep Kyle and Amanda Franklin in your prayers as they recover from extensive burns.

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              • #8
                I was stationed in Minot ND between '66 and '70, a SAC base who's mission was B52's and KC/EC 135's we had a T33, C54 and a C47 (goony bird/DC3). I spent many a day in their hanger keeping them fit to fly.
                Way better than out on the flite line -30F with a 25 knot wind.

                THANX RICH

                People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!
                People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

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                • #9
                  My first commercial flight was in a DC-3. I was fourteen, it was 1955, and I needed to get back to Seattle from Victoria where my father and I had tried to get a spot on the US Olympics team, with our 29-foot Dragon Class sloop. The flight from Sidney (BC) to Seattle was about an hour, I guess, and I'll never forget the view.

                  Has anybody here had a first commercial flight on an older aircraft?
                  Last edited by aostling; 03-20-2011, 12:38 AM.
                  Allan Ostling

                  Phoenix, Arizona

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                  • #10
                    Has anybody here had a first commercial flight on an older aircraft?
                    Well I'm probably a pup here, but my first commercial flight was at the age of six, in 1956. Amsterdam to New York via Gander, Nfld.
                    The aircraft was a Lockheed Super Constellation.
                    In addition to the four, Wright R3350 18cyl. radials, it also was the first pressurized airliner.
                    The sound of those radials and the ones from the Stearman crop dusters I remember seeing in the late 50's while growing up in the San Joaquin Valley of California, is what still stirs some fond memories.

                    Maybe not an "older" aircraft...but it still used propellers the way God intended.
                    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                    Location: British Columbia

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                    • #11
                      When my older brother had his A&P lisense for only two or three years, he got a job at Butler Aviation at O'hare Airport. One of his jobs was to check the DC 3 twice a day after its run to Flint Michigan. It seems the frames for some automobile was made in a plant in Chicago and twice a day loaded onto the DC 3 and flown to detroit.
                      When I first saw the plane it was nighttime and my brother was shining his flaslight on the ramp. When i asked what he was looking for he answered fresh oil. If there was oil on the ramp that meant that the engine was getting oil.
                      When he showed his light on the plane it looked like somebody had beaten the the thing from the inside with a bag of nickles, or in this case car frames.
                      We went in the cargo door which was being held on with, I swear, modified gate hinges.
                      In the cockpit the instrument panel had a lot of holes in it where the instruments were missing. I don't know which ones. Cockpit lighting was two flashlights taped to the ceiling above the pilots and copilots seats.
                      The funniest thing was the alarm clock taped to the top of the instrument panel.
                      my brother told me that one the plane was over Lake Michigan the pilot engaged the autopilot and took a nap. The clock was to wake him up over Michigan.
                      I'm sure he was pulling my leg.
                      Right?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by aostling
                        Has anybody here had a first commercial flight on an older aircraft?
                        Not my first, but my second.

                        My first was in a Cessna 150? Two seater, probably about 1968.

                        Then around 1972, I took my first commercial flight. I went from Aberdeen, South Dakota to Minneapolis. Don't know what kind of plane it was except that it was relatively small, held 20 or 30 passengers. Twin engine prop plane.

                        The part that I remember distinctly was smoke coming up out of the floor once we were cruising. No idea what the smoke was from but it was nerve wracking.

                        Brian
                        OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                        THINK HARDER

                        BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                        MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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                        • #13
                          First flight was Jacksonville to Tampa on a twin engine, twin tail ,tail dragger.
                          About 1948. I think it was a Lockeed but not sure. There was no security in those days so I was invited to the cockpit and actually flew the plane with some left and right turns. I remember the wing spar came right through the cabin and you had to step over it to go forward. Later I had many flights in DC3 's flown by Southern and Trans Texas. On flights from the Mississippi coast to Memphis you could order hamburgers and beer to be waiting for you at the next landing.
                          I learned to fly in the 60's in Cessna 150 and 172 and owned a Piper J3 . Finally I actually flew a B-17.
                          Good luck all,
                          John R

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                          • #14
                            First Flight

                            My first flight was on a DC-6 from San Francisco to Okinawa in 1958. I was 6 years old. The leg from SF to Hawaii was at night and I remember looking out the window and thinking the wing was on fire. On the trip over we landed on Hawaii, Guam, Wake Island, the Philippines, Japan and finally Okinawa (not necessarily in that order, I was only 6 you know). We spent 3 years on Okinawa before coming home on an old troop ship converted to passenger use (the USS General Mann). About 3 days into the 30 day passage home I was sure missing that DC-6. One highlight of the trip back, was landing in the port of Yokohama and seeing the hospital where I was born from the deck of our ship .

                            Tim
                            Last edited by tmc_31; 03-20-2011, 08:56 PM.

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                            • #15
                              I lived in Alaska for 6 years. We flew on Alaska Airlines- Airways?) up to Sitka on old Grumman Gray Goose twin engine ex Navy sea planes. they could nearly shake your teeth out. They flew pretty low,and hit numerous air pockets. The plane would seem to drop several feet,and hit the bottom of the pocket with a terrific CLANG!!!! I was entering the 4th. grade,and got very airsick!!!

                              Coming down to Seattle in 1957,we flew a Constellation. A MUCH smoother plane.

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