Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Is anyone making a few dollars with a Horizontal Mill?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Is anyone making a few dollars with a Horizontal Mill?

    Thanks to some interesting pointers from a few members I was able to reasonably price and complete the last job. There is more work available, much of which seems to currently done on a Bridgeport. I may be able to price the job well, and be quick about it by straddle milling the parts in my Horizontal Mill ( Pedersen 12 by 50). But I wonder, does anyone else use a horizontal nowadays or if not why not? Secondly does anyone run a digital readout on a horizontal, and is it really useful? regards David Powell.

  • #2
    Originally posted by David Powell
    Thanks to some interesting pointers from a few members I was able to reasonably price and complete the last job. There is more work available, much of which seems to currently done on a Bridgeport. I may be able to price the job well, and be quick about it by straddle milling the parts in my Horizontal Mill ( Pedersen 12 by 50). But I wonder, does anyone else use a horizontal nowadays or if not why not? Secondly does anyone run a digital readout on a horizontal, and is it really useful? regards David Powell.
    Yes, on XY&Z
    & Yes,
    very useful for setting up,
    invaluable when doing a closed ended slot,
    also when using it as a horizontal boring machine

    more reliable than eyes & memory
    plus you don't have to worry about any backlash

    john
    John

    I used to be indecisive. Now I'm not so sure , but I'm not a complete idiot - some bits are still missing

    Comment


    • #3
      Friend of mine produces Picatinny scope base stock, uses his horizontal to cross groove the bases for the scope rings.

      David
      David Kaiser
      “You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once.”
      ― Robert A. Heinlein

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes to the horizontal, bo to the DRO.

        I just put a 3/16" keyway in 3ft of 5/8ths. Thing is, you know the cutter is going to be as good when you finish as when you start. A vertical cutter would get knackered halfway down, and you'd want to take a few passes at it anyway.

        I'm getting better at knowing the limits of my mill, and when the horizontal will do it, I find it's almost always worth the back-breaking effort of unloading the vertical head.

        I recently got hold of an old slab mill, so there's excitement round the corner !
        Richard - SW London, UK, EU.

        Comment


        • #5
          A heavy horizontal will remove metal MUCH faster than a Bridgeport. I used to get a particular job every year that I made a lot of money per hour doing with my Harrison horizontal mill. It consisted of milling 4 "V" shaped grooves each way on 8" squares of brass sheet,so they looked like tic-tac-toe games. This enabled the square sheets to be accurately folded up into cubes. Part of awards that were given every year.

          I made the first batch 1 groove at a time,but then made a 4 cutter milling cutter which not only cut 4 grooves at once,but automatically insured accurate spacing without measuring,shifting the table by precise amounts,etc..

          Comment


          • #6
            I haven't done any in awhile,but I used to run 1-1/2 and 2" OD shafts for a local company.They were 40" long and needed 8" of keyway in each end.

            50 pieces each and each one would take 15 minutes per end.I think I have done nearly 500 of them on the same two cutters and they are still sharp.

            Would have been a nightmare on a Bridgeport.
            I just need one more tool,just one!

            Comment


            • #7
              My local Caterpillar dealer before I left NY had a large horizontal with about a 70" table in their fabrication shop. They used it for everything from line boring to hogging metal, and made quite a bit of money with it daily. Now that I think about it, that may have been their only mill.
              "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

              Comment

              Working...
              X