Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

4 Jaw Chucks RULE!!!!!!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 4 Jaw Chucks RULE!!!!!!

    ok i got my 4 jaw chuck and mounting plate in from busy bee today for my lathe only cost me 150.00 with tax and shippping..

    good deal for being on sale, any how i set her all up slaped in a peice of aluim and in less then 10 min had it dialed in at way less then half a thou of total run out not bad for doing it by eye , slaped on the indicator to verfi my thoughts and man its so sweet i dont know how i went this long with out one, now i can add to my skills and turn stuff alot more percision then ever ,,


    ok so iam a kid at christmas

  • #2
    Yup. Plus, they tend to be larger than stock 3-jaws.

    Since my mini-lathe, I put a 4-jaw on and rarely use anything else. I like being able to flip a part and machine somewhere else, and ensure the runout is nonexistent.

    Spend time on it and--yes, I have done this a few times--you can dial it in until your indicator shows .0000.

    Comment


    • #3
      Couldn't agree more. I used a battered old three jaw for years. Now I have four jaws on both lathes, and the three jaw chucks haven't been off the shelf in two months.

      I find it much more fulfilling to dial in on a four jaw than to mess with shimming in a three jaw.

      I say to myself I'll work on my three jaw chucks, but I really see no reason why I'd want to use them again.

      The only boring thing is winding one or more jaws right out to swap ends. I'm thinking of dedicating a drill/driver to that.

      I prefer a nice thin lightweight chuck to those heavy beasts though. I have two of the former, but I need a third.
      Richard - SW London, UK, EU.

      Comment


      • #4
        With a bit of practice a part can very quickly be made to run true in a four jaw chuck. Other very nice benefits are that a four jaw can grip a part MUCH more firmly than a three jaw, allowing heavier cuts, smaller gripping areas, and longer unsupported work pieces extending from the chuck.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Deus Machina
          Spend time on it and--yes, I have done this a few times--you can dial it in until your indicator shows .0000.
          Just remember that that will only happen with a ground surface finish, a good dial indicator will show irregularities in the order of 0.01 mm at the surface of a turned piece
          Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

          Comment


          • #6
            I hope everybody is talking about an "independent 4-jaw chuck". If you have a "universal 4-jaw chuck" - your parts would better be turned! If not - that is where a 3-jaw comes into play.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Juergenwt
              I hope everybody is talking about an "independent 4-jaw chuck". If you have a "universal 4-jaw chuck" - your parts would better be turned! If not - that is where a 3-jaw comes into play.
              I bought a 4 jaw independent chuck

              Comment


              • #8
                I like my 4-jaw. Sadly it won't grab anything smaller than 3/8" in dia.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tony Ennis
                  I like my 4-jaw. Sadly it won't grab anything smaller than 3/8" in dia.
                  So go get a cheapo mini-lathe chuck, grab your work with that and then grab the little chuck with the big 4 jaw and get it dialed. Or, get a Er collet chuck and grab that with the 4 jaw....once it's centered, the Collets are pretty repeatable.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yeah no doubt about it...4-jaw chucks rule!

                    Not only do you have repeatability, but it also opens up a whole new world of material that can be turned.
                    With a bit of practice it won't take any longer than a three jaw to dial in either, especially when one considers the degree of repeatability that is inherent with the 4-jaw.

                    I believe everyone should only have a 4-jaw for the first 2 years of lathe use, after that, unless it's repetitious work, you'll seldom look at a 3-jaw again.
                    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                    Location: British Columbia

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      we get ripped off so bad in canada with our busybeetools and kbctools ...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Elninio
                        we get ripped off so bad in canada with our busybeetools and kbctools ...
                        and gas, housing, groceries, cars, clothes, etc., etc. ......
                        Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                        Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                        Location: British Columbia

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          3 jaw chuck.. Uhh, thats the one for holding hex stock securely right?

                          Congrats though on learning the way! Soon you'll be able to dial things in to thou within a min.
                          Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have both a four jaw indy and 4J self centering. I have no three jaw at at all. The 4J SC is pretty accurate, but can't compare to dialing in an indy chuck. I'm not even sure what a four jaw SC is really good for as opposed to a three jaw; it just came with my lathe.

                            BTW, the 4J SC chuck is a big honkin piece of steel, I like it cause I swear it has a flywheel effect on my underpowered South Bend 9".

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              A truly good 3-jaw chuck also has value. I have a 10" Pratt Burnerd Super Precision that holds anything in its range within .0005". I have a 12" Pratt Burnerd 4-jaw independent chuck, but I've only had it on the machine once that I can recall.

                              I've used 4-jaw independent chucks for many years in the places I worked. I know what they can do, and I know what I can do with them. For 95% of what I need to do on the lathe, the good 3-jaw chuck or the collet closer do just fine.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X