Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New member with lathe question

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New member with lathe question

    I am thinking of buying a Grizzly 10x22 lathe. I have used my trusty Taig for 7 years and recently sold a Prazi 5x12. I need/want a bigger unit.

    Opinions on this lathe are most welcome or any related information.

    Thank you for your help.

    John

  • #2
    My opinion is a 10" lathe with 22" between centers is not good enough. You really need at least 36" and better with 40".
    It's only ink and paper

    Comment


    • #3
      From the several that I've seen I would have to say for $1100 it's a lot of lathe for the buck.
      A decent work envelop, MT4 headstock with a 1" spindle bore, MT3 tail stock, and a pretty comprehensive range of threads both inch and metric that can be cut. It's definitely a giant leap above the traditional entry level 9 x 20 lathes.

      Short comings are a way too fast low speed at 150 rpm, try cutting a coarse thread up to shoulder at 150 rpm, yikes! Also it seems to have a somewhat flimsy toolpost mount clamping arrangement.
      But hey throw a couple of hundred bucks of improvements at it and all of a sudden there's not so much to pick at.

      Comparing you former lathe's work envelop to the 10 x 22 you can see that there is a huge increase in room. The big question is how much room do you need? Everybody wants a 20 x 120 lathe with all the bells and whistles but what's practical and what are you going to use it for is all that matters.

      Personally I'd compare them to the ubiquitous 4 x 6 metal band saw, not perfect but a lot of bang for the buck!
      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

      Location: British Columbia

      Comment


      • #4
        Grizzly have a good reputation in the low end market. It's a modern design. It comes with all the necessary standard equipment. If the size is right for your needs then buy it.

        Phil

        Comment


        • #5
          Have one of my own, very impressed with it for the money. A little small for what I would like to work on, but big enough for what I can reasonably expect to trust myself to, for now. I had a 7x14 before this, and mostly moved up for the swing, not the length.

          If I had access to 3-phase, I would have saved up some more and gotten larger. But since I'm currently stuck at 110 power in the garage, it's about as good as it gets.

          Everything on it can be redone. I am going to add another pulley to it to try and cut that 150 minimum speed to 75 or 100 or so, for threadcutting.

          Comment


          • #6
            g0602

            I too have one. Just picked it up last Monday. So far Im happy with it. Though I havent cut chips with it yet. Just finished doing electrical work and a bench. I felt it was the best bang for the buck.

            Comment


            • #7
              Thank you all for your feedback. How about a collet setup on this Grizzly 10x22? Does anybody have a setup for collets and, if so, what kind of collets? Thank you for your help.

              Sincerely, John

              Comment


              • #8
                John,
                Join this group. There is a member that did a 5C collet conversion for his lathe. I havent fully looked into how he did it but there is good info here nonetheless. Free to join and has a lot of members with good knowledge.

                http://us.rd.yahoo.com/evt=42879/*ht...zzlyandthelike

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Carld
                  My opinion is a 10" lathe with 22" between centers is not good enough. You really need at least 36" and better with 40".

                  might want to try asking what he needs to do with it first bigger is not always better

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have to agree with airsmith I have a 10 24 and it is easily big enough for myself and is quite a good size for most people hobbiests as well as pro's.I suppose you cannot suggest a size till you find out what the new guy want to do.Incidently JSEDDS welcome, welcome, welcome .
                    There are great people here I hope you enjoy our group .Alistair
                    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      jsedds asked, "Opinions on this lathe are most welcome or any related information."

                      I posted, "My opinion is a 10" lathe with 22" between centers is not good enough. You really need at least 36" and better with 40"."

                      I still stand with my OPINION. You can have your opinion as well. He did ask for opinions and that is what we are giving.

                      At some point he will wish he had more between centers and it may be sooner than he thinks.
                      Last edited by Carld; 03-22-2011, 07:14 PM.
                      It's only ink and paper

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I agree with the "For its" here, a number of people i know have them around that size and are turning out some really decent work with them.
                        Some have a few minor problems, that need to be corrected, but most seem quite well done and reliable.
                        The bonus for many as previously stated above is the larger hole through the headstock which many if not almost all older american lathes in that size did not have.
                        I see "Little Machine Shop" now has a model with :Power Cross Feed".
                        I have no connection to them other than purchasing a few goodies.
                        Have fun and enjoy your,e lathe!!!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Carld
                          jsedds asked, "Opinions on this lathe are most welcome or any related information."

                          I posted, "My opinion is a 10" lathe with 22" between centers is not good enough. You really need at least 36" and better with 40"."

                          I still stand with my OPINION. You can have your opinion as well. He did ask for opinions and that is what we are giving.

                          At some point he will wish he had more between centers and it may be sooner than he thinks.

                          I agree with you about the size and if he has the room and the bit extra money I would recommend it also. I have seen 12 x 36 lathes advertised as low as $1800 online over their.
                          You are not limited with spindle bore and there are more accessories that fit these machines. You can always do small jobs on a big lathe, but it is a bit hard (if not impossible) doing big jobs on a small lathe.
                          If you buy a 12 x 36 of 12 by 40 it is very rare you will ever buy another lathe and looked after will last a lifetime.
                          Every time you buy and sell a lathe to upgrade to something bigger you loose money.

                          Dave

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Lathe size is purely a personal choice.
                            I agree a larger lathe allows one to grow into machining and use it for things you haven't yet acquired the knowledge or skills for. I know as soon as you have a lathe with 22" between centers you'll end up with a project that requires 23"-25". The same can probably be said for a lathe with 40" centers.
                            To those that say it hasn't happened to them yet, all I can say is that it hasn't happened to a lot of people with smaller lathes either.
                            Lets face it, not everyone has the need or desire to turn large iron.
                            I know I do, but then I also realize my wants and needs don't necessarily reflect those of others.

                            This is why I always ask those buying their first or second machine to ask themselves what is that they want to do with it, keeping in mind the possible future growth in machining that a larger lathe will allow.
                            But lets face it some guys can do some incredible stuff with a smaller lathe and have absolutely no interest in a big one.
                            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                            Location: British Columbia

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              newbie/10x22 Grizzly Thanks to all for feedback

                              To All:
                              Thanks to all of you for the feedback. It is very helpful. My main "machining hobby" is making/repairing clocks so any clockmakers out there it would be great to here from you. I would still enjoy hearing more from the Grizzly users-especially if it's a 10x22. Quirks, problems, good stuff, etc.,. Anything is helpful to me.

                              Thanks again. I will frequent this board. I hope some of you don't get annoyed with my basic/beginners questions.

                              Sincerely, John (Pword-jsedds)

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X