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How fast for my lathe spindle?

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  • How fast for my lathe spindle?

    IMGP9196 by aardvark_akubra, on Flickr


    I have a Drummond 3 1/2" flat bed lathe from about 1908. It has bronze bearings with oil cup lubrication. My next task, after cleaning and a lick of paint, is to rig up a motor for this and I would like indications on the maximum speed I should allow for in my drive system. Spindle is about 1" diameter.

    Thanks

  • #2
    I've looked at the details on tonys site ..nothing there about rpm

    i would say max of 1200.

    would not be suprised if it was a tredle lathe with the date

    you need a counter shaft .

    edit slower than that

    pic here from a later m-type



    all the best.markj
    Last edited by aboard_epsilon; 04-01-2011, 07:48 AM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by The Artful Bodger
      IMGP9196 by aardvark_akubra, on Flickr


      I have a Drummond 3 1/2" flat bed lathe from about 1908. It has bronze bearings with oil cup lubrication. My next task, after cleaning and a lick of paint, is to rig up a motor for this and I would like indications on the maximum speed I should allow for in my drive system. Spindle is about 1" diameter.

      Thanks

      About 800 maximum would be my advice. The Drummond M plate which Mark shows won't be far off, but its a later machine, probably got better bearings, so a bit slower than that.

      Richard

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      • #4
        Now if that ain't the cutest little lathe I don't know what is.
        It's only ink and paper

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        • #5
          That is a cute little lathe.

          As to spindle speed a lot of the plain bearing lathes would use different viscosity oils on the spindle for different speeds, lighter oils for high speeds and heavier for lower speeds. I'd start with the heavier oil and go to lighter if the spindle warms too much. Note that we're talking ISO 24 up to maybe an ISO 68. Be sure to avoid oils that might harm a bronze bearing, some oils in automotive use can do that.

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          • #6
            beautiful.

            Have no advice about the speed, but thanks for posting the pic of that nice little lathe, a beauty!!!

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            • #7
              Thanks for the comments and for the information, I will be aiming for a top speed of about 800rpm.

              Now I need to scour the treasure store room for suitable bits to make the countershaft.

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              • #8
                Many years ago, i had a 3&1/2" centre height belt driven lathe, Using this lathe i ran the countershaft at 600 revs/minute, At that speed i never had any trouble
                Remember these machines are "old ladies" and one cannot horse them on like the modern machines with their ball &roller bearing headstocks,

                Saying that at home i tend to err on machining things a bit slower than one would in an industrial environment, conserving tools is more important to me than rapid metal removal after one has left the work place for ever, money is harder to come by, Saying that my machining speeds using ordinary high speed steel tools is more in the speed ranges found in the 1950-60 era, I get there just the same.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by oil mac
                  Many years ago, i had a 3&1/2" centre height belt driven lathe, Using this lathe i ran the countershaft at 600 revs/minute, At that speed i never had any trouble
                  Remember these machines are "old ladies" and one cannot horse them on like the modern machines with their ball &roller bearing headstocks,

                  Saying that at home i tend to err on machining things a bit slower than one would in an industrial environment, conserving tools is more important to me than rapid metal removal after one has left the work place for ever, money is harder to come by, Saying that my machining speeds using ordinary high speed steel tools is more in the speed ranges found in the 1950-60 era, I get there just the same.


                  I agree entirely with this. When this lathe was built, carbon steel tools were all that was available, not even HSS, so throw any thoughts of modern feeds and speeds right out of the window. I would use HSS tooling, and light cuts, then judge the speed by 'feel' not science. The only time I would bother with carbide tooling on this machine would be to get under the skin on a casting. A lot of good work was done on machines like this.
                  Some modern oils have sulphur in them which will attack bronze bearings, but a straight SW20 or SW30 lawnmower oil would be OK

                  Richard

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