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  • slotting a screw best way

    I made a screw and know how do I slot it. So the slot is in the senter of the screw, I did one and it was off a lot. I alined the screw with my slitting saw marked the line on the screw senterd it all up on my mill and opps it was off. Or how should I hold it, I used my indexing head with a 3 jaw chuck Brett

  • #2
    Brett, I'd bring the saw down to just touching the top of the screw. Then move the saw down 1/2 the OD of the screw + 1/2 the thickness of the saw. That should get you within a thou or two of being on center.

    cheers,
    Michael

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    • #3
      Brett, as Michael says. You say your using a indexing head, then after making the cut rotate the work 180 degrees and make another cut. This should guarantee the slot will be in center of screw. gary

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Michael Moore
        Brett, I'd bring the saw down to just touching the top of the screw. Then move the saw down 1/2 the OD of the screw + 1/2 the thickness of the saw. That should get you within a thou or two of being on center.

        cheers,
        Michael
        Pertty much, However I would recommend getting some zigzags (Cig rolling papers)
        You put the paper beween the work and tool, And slowly pull it out from beween them while slowly cranking the axis on your mill

        Eventualy, the paper will get grabed beween the tool and work and likey rip. This tells you EXACTLY when they contact.. well, +0.001" or so. (Zigzags are a rather reliable thickness), And will tell you when they contact much more accurately then by eye or feel on the axis knob. Plus more likey to make you stop cranking the axis before they hit so hard as to damage the tool. (VERY easy to do with anything carbide (Brittle!), Little harder with HSS)

        Once you know where the tool touchs, Do it once more extra slow and careful to confirm the exact position. (This will go really fast since you only have about 0.005" of cranking to do since you know almost exactly where it should contact)
        Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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        • #5
          slotting a screw

          To hold the screw for slotting bore and tap a thick piece of metal (thickness = screw thread length) mounted in the mill vice. Insert screw, if needed add a set screw at 90 degrees to hold the screw tight. I have slotted the heads of many threaded pins this way.

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          • #6
            U know u can buy screws already slotted.......
            I spent most of my money on women and booze, the rest I just wasted.

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            • #7
              If you are doing a bunch of screws, use the index head on the mill. If you only have one or two to do, you can save a lot of time with setting up by using the screw slotting fixture that I designed when I worked for Brownells: http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=1...W_SLOT_FIXTURE

              Too bad I don't get royalties!

              David
              David Kaiser
              “You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having both at once.”
              ― Robert A. Heinlein

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              • #8
                I have one of those nifty little tools!

                Use it all the time to straighten out buggered screw slots caused by Bubba and his tapered Sears screwdrivers.

                Kudo's David.

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                • #9
                  Thanks guys

                  I will try it and let you know oh with the rolling papers can I use them any otherrrr way Like I used too do in 60"s Brett

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                  • #10
                    Don't forget that the quill feed on your average mill/drill isn't always that precise. Check it with a dial indicator.

                    I had one that was graduated for 2.5mm per rev and was actually 3.0mm per rev. Even afer fitting a new dial a bit a rack/pinion binding made precise Z axis positioning a bit hit and miss. An HSMer could run a mill for years and not notice, until a part requiring a precise depth, like a screw slot.

                    Phil

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                    • #11
                      Smoky?

                      No brett go easy on them that way we dont want to cause a shortage like there was in the 60's.

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                      • #12
                        I make a few screws here in the shop. For a while there I was having issues with buggering the threads when slotting.

                        What I’ve done was to drill & tap a 5C emergency collet to the screw size, then hold in a 5C Collet block, and mount in my vise.

                        I don’t like using a slitting saw, way too much runout. I ground a keyway cutter to the correct width, then, center on screw head & cut.
                        Mike Hunter

                        www.mikehunterrestorations.com

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                        • #13
                          thanks Black_Moons

                          I used the zigzags and it worked I made 14 of them out of SS 12/24 thread 1in long .040 slot look great thanks for the info Brett

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 38_Cal
                            If you are doing a bunch of screws, use the index head on the mill. If you only have one or two to do, you can save a lot of time with setting up by using the screw slotting fixture that I designed when I worked for Brownells: http://www.brownells.com/.aspx/pid=1...W_SLOT_FIXTURE

                            Too bad I don't get royalties!

                            David
                            I'm having a hard time seeing it on my monitor. It appears as if the capscrew on the side is used for clamping the screw to be slotted and that said screw is held by its threads, one side against the capscrew, the other against the hole of some kind in the jig. Is this correct, and if so do the threads not get damaged in the clamping process?

                            Ed P

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Brett Hurt
                              I made a screw and know how do I slot it. So the slot is in the senter of the screw, I did one and it was off a lot. I alined the screw with my slitting saw marked the line on the screw senterd it all up on my mill and opps it was off. Or how should I hold it, I used my indexing head with a 3 jaw chuck Brett
                              Done that myself. Hold the screw in the indexer, cut the slot as close as you can, then spin through 180 degrees and cut the slot again. It might end up a bit wider than you intended but it will be central.

                              Richard

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