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Question for the musical instrument makers ?

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  • Question for the musical instrument makers ?

    I have a question about the material that is sold on Stewmac and Warmouth sites. For pick guard material, it is referred to as Rigid sheet PVC or vinyl rigid sheet. Googling brings up every thing, including Stemac's and a number of other music instrument sites that sell it. Most being semi rigid sheets goods for wall covering.

    Is it a laminated Sintra type product PVC closed cell expanded foam sheet, or an ABS laminated engraving sheet goods. As that is the only material that seems to have 2 or 3 ply's.

    Somebody I know has access to a small pneumatic rotary engraving machine. They have an idea that they can paint with the engraver on the sheet goods, but they need larger size sheet's then is sold as pick guard material. So they can be placed in frames, and for kiddie room light swith plate covers.

    And I amusing that when it is sold as a pick guard material it is sold at a premium.

    The custom building sites, aren't much help either. As they talk about using floor tile and just about anything else as a pick guard material.
    Any suggestions would be appreciated, to cut down the buy and try it learning curve. And they don't have a lot of extra cash right now.
    Glen
    Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
    I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
    All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

  • #2
    Originally posted by PTSideshow
    I have a question about the material that is sold on Stewmac and Warmouth sites. For pick guard material, it is referred to as Rigid sheet PVC or vinyl rigid sheet. Googling brings up every thing, including Stemac's and a number of other music instrument sites that sell it. Most being semi rigid sheets goods for wall covering.

    Is it a laminated Sintra type product PVC closed cell expanded foam sheet, or an ABS laminated engraving sheet goods. As that is the only material that seems to have 2 or 3 ply's.

    Somebody I know has access to a small pneumatic rotary engraving machine. They have an idea that they can paint with the engraver on the sheet goods, but they need larger size sheet's then is sold as pick guard material. So they can be placed in frames, and for kiddie room light swith plate covers.

    And I amusing that when it is sold as a pick guard material it is sold at a premium.

    The custom building sites, aren't much help either. As they talk about using floor tile and just about anything else as a pick guard material.
    Any suggestions would be appreciated, to cut down the buy and try it learning curve. And they don't have a lot of extra cash right now.
    I don't know the answer but Frank will probably be along shortly with an answer. Or you could go here:

    http://www.frets.com/

    and ask him. Has a good machining site there too.

    Comment


    • #3
      Glad to see Frank Ford is back, maybe he can help me out. It is the 3 ply laminated material made by Rowmark who makes some of the material that is used by a custom pic guard maker.
      In addition to the use of it by this women and the small hand rotary engraver. I'm planing on using some for insert accents material in wood turning projects.
      I have found out that it isn't Sintra.
      Glen
      Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
      I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
      All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

      Comment


      • #4
        Years ago I got a bunch of plastic sheets laminated up to saw black and white layered bindings out of. I Googled them and they seem to still be thre. You can get stuff from them much cheaper than buying from a secondary distributor: Leathertone Plastics.

        If this is useful to you,write thank you on a $20.00 bill and send it to me.

        You can specify whatever thicknesses and colors you want. My sheets were about 12" X 36" IIRC. I think the thinnest sheets in my laminated sheets were .010". I am sure they supply the guitar factories.

        Comment


        • #5
          Older laminated pickguards were celluloid, and that stuff is available, but expensive and not desirable for your use, I'd say.

          Far as I've seen the sheets sold for electric guitar pickguards are the same laminated stuff the pantograph engraver down the street uses to make badges, trophies, and plaques.

          For sure, it's sold at a serious premium by the luthier supply outfits, who try for about a 40% markup to keep the doors open. You'd be surprised at how many hobby and even professional instrument builders want to buy a piece of something that's just big enough for that one project. Me, I like having lots of material around because I never know what I'll be getting into next. Hard to say which might be more economical. . .
          Cheers,

          Frank Ford
          HomeShopTech

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks, yes I was given a corner cracked piece by the local music/guitar store repair place. A cover for the hole on the back, and It does for all practical purposes appear to be some brand of engraving laminate.
            And you are correct on the premium price size when called pick guard material. Didn't need the tortoise shell, mint green or other fancy pattern color.
            You could by a 4'x4' sheet of the laminate for what they wanted for a very small section of the pick guard.
            I figure that when I cut/hollow the center section out of a bowl or jar I won't feel so bad about the money being lost. If it is the cheaper stuff.

            And I feel the same about the material,never know when the fancy will strike.
            Glen
            Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
            I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
            All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

            Comment


            • #7
              I was once contracted to build a traditional European musical instrument, for a collector.
              Fortunately I passed on the job.

              The instrument was a South Baltic wind instrument called a "Fonorton"
              It was seventy-two feet long, with three valves in the middle, and it was played by one man by blowing into both ends at the same time.
              No good deed goes unpunished.

              Comment


              • #8
                engraving plastic

                Two color laminated plastic for rotary engraving machines is all over the place. Practically every engraving shop uses the stuff to make signs, nameplates, etc.
                Here is a random link to a 2 foot by 4 foot piece:
                http://www.hansensupply.com/engravin...s-122-206.html

                Manufacturer of some of the machines sells engraving stock:
                http://www.gravograph.com/usa/engrav...s/Overview.php

                3-ply Polyethylene 4x8' sheets in 1/2" and 3/4" thicknesses:
                http://www.portplastics.com/plastics...yCarveVYC.html

                just google "engraving plastic".

                For light switch covers, there are fire safety issues.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Somebody shoot me down right away if for some reason this is a bad idea, but why not use plastic laminate? Formica, Arborite, that kind of thing. You can get 2 ft x 4 ft pieces of it for 5 bucks, and choose the color and texture.

                  To avoid warping, you can glue it back to back with contact cement or epoxy. Most of it is quite wear resistant, and there are some that can be selected to be more wear resistant.

                  It's melamine, basically, on a substrate.

                  If you laminate it back to back you would probably choose to use postform, which is thinner material. The result would be about .06 to about .08 inch thick, and if you want thicker you could either use standard thickness, or combine one thin sheet with one thick sheet. The edges can be finished to look good.
                  I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by darryl
                    Somebody shoot me down right away if for some reason this is a bad idea, but why not use plastic laminate? Formica, Arborite, that kind of thing. You can get 2 ft x 4 ft pieces of it for 5 bucks, and choose the color and texture.

                    To avoid warping, you can glue it back to back with contact cement or epoxy. Most of it is quite wear resistant, and there are some that can be selected to be more wear resistant.

                    It's melamine, basically, on a substrate.

                    If you laminate it back to back you would probably choose to use postform, which is thinner material. The result would be about .06 to about .08 inch thick, and if you want thicker you could either use standard thickness, or combine one thin sheet with one thick sheet. The edges can be finished to look good.
                    Most Formica type laminate is a thin layer of printed materiel attached to a solid color layer backing. It is also a some what brittle material when not attached to a solid subsurface. And cracks and splits easily.

                    The idea is to have 3 layers of plastic to work with, so you could remove layers and have different colors for representing light and shade. I have a supplier of engraving laminates. The lady was sure that the pick guard material was a superior magic quality material. After talking to a tech at Rowmark plastics, and Franks conformation that the only thing magical about the pick guard material is the price that the instrument makers suppliers charge for pieces under 1.5²ft

                    Will be going with the local supplier that will sell 1 sheet of one colors, and some of the assorted drops they have.
                    Glen
                    Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
                    I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
                    All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Don't know how it relates exactly but search for Fordite on eBay, jewelry made from colorful auto paint buildup from paint booth at Ford assembly plants.

                      Formica used to market Colorcore that was colored was all the way through.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks for that link!

                        I have never heard of "Fordite", but I am amazed at the ingenious folks that have learned to recycle an industrial waste in to objects of beauty.

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