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Pamper those tools and instruments..

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  • Pamper those tools and instruments..

    Start with one of these:-


    IMGP9216 by aardvark_akubra, on Flickr

    ...and one of these...


    IMGP9215 by aardvark_akubra, on Flickr


    ....some of your treasured tools and instruements..

    IMGP9217 by aardvark_akubra, on Flickr

    ....covered with a bit of cloth from the t-shirt..


    IMGP9219 by aardvark_akubra, on Flickr
    Last edited by The Artful Bodger; 04-12-2011, 12:26 AM.

  • #2
    ...shake up a can of this...

    IMGP9218 by aardvark_akubra, on Flickr

    ...lay it on them..

    IMGP9220 by aardvark_akubra, on Flickr

    ...lay some newspaper over it...

    IMGP9222 by aardvark_akubra, on Flickr

    ....pat it down and squish it around to fill any voids...

    IMGP9223 by aardvark_akubra, on Flickr

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    • #3
      ...put a board over it all and weight it down well..

      IMGP9224 by aardvark_akubra, on Flickr


      ....get a good night's sleep and in the morning..

      IMGP9225 by aardvark_akubra, on Flickr


      Comment


      • #4
        Well, dang! And you can inexpensively re-arrange the tools and re-bed the drawer, spritz the T shirt material with an anti rust juice, maybe even color coordinate. I bet I got 50 old (really big) T shirts.

        Good use for an old rock band shirt. Hm. A tidy row of mikes bedded in the leering skull and mushroom cloud of "MegaDeath"; how tasteful.
        Last edited by Forrest Addy; 04-12-2011, 01:24 AM.

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        • #5
          Now it makes sense - the shirt is the secret. I had trouble imagining what it was for, thinking that since the foam is epoxy based ( right?), it would harden the mesh. This is great, I'll be trying this today!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Elninio
            Now it makes sense - the shirt is the secret. I had trouble imagining what it was for, thinking that since the foam is epoxy based ( right?), it would harden the mesh. This is great, I'll be trying this today!

            No, not epoxy, it is air cured polyurethane.

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            • #7
              Great idea!

              I would put a 1/2" board in the drawer base to begin with, to be sure the tools don't sit high enough to catch on the drawer above. Also, the foam will cure faster, and fill more, if the cloth is slightly damp.
              Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

              Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
              Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
              Monarch 10EE 1942

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Peter.
                Great idea!

                I would put a 1/2" board in the drawer base to begin with, to be sure the tools don't sit high enough to catch on the drawer above. Also, the foam will cure faster, and fill more, if the cloth is slightly damp.
                Although I mentioned dampening the cloth when I wrote about this previously I do not now recommend it, unless you live in Marble Bar or somewhere else hot and dry.

                You do not want the foam to cure faster as you need to be able to knead it around a bit to avoid voids and overnight is plenty long enough for it to go quite hard.

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                • #9
                  it all looks great ..

                  i don't know what foam youre using

                  but the expanding stuff seems to break down in a five years or so and become dust ..starts this disintegration process as soon as it sets up ..not immediately obvious to the eye at first ..

                  i wonder ..sometimes weather ..not to far ahead in time ..
                  we are going to see a big recall and scare .

                  because half or more double glazing plastic UPVC windows in the UK are held in place with this stuff ..with no other fixings ..

                  my boat was built in 1978 or there abouts ..between the inner and outer hull was foam filled ..that foam is no more ..it does not exist ..and i didn't do a thing to it .

                  ive woirked on old cars where this stuff is used arouind dashes etc ..and it just turns to dust as soon as you disturb it

                  and another point ..ive seen instrument camera cases accessories etc ..where they used sponge foam and the sponge has broken down into goo and dust just from dirty fingers touching it ..oiley tools would bugger it up in a couple of months

                  all the best.markj
                  Last edited by aboard_epsilon; 04-12-2011, 07:36 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by aboard_epsilon
                    but the expanding stuff seems to break down in a five years or so and become dust ..starts this disintegration process as soon as it sets up ..not immediately obvious to the eye at first ..
                    I moved in to my house about 12 years back and used many cans of the expanding stuff to fill up the cracks and keep out the mice. Any of the foam that has been exposed to the weather and specifically the sunlight has started to break down and blow away. The stuff on the outside that was painted is holding up ok and the stuff on the inside of the house is like new. The outside of the new cans notes to not let it be exposed to sunlight.

                    I dont know what they were using in the 70's on your boat or if the formulation is different 'cross the pond. Todays stuff seems to be holding up well though.

                    I think I'll have to give it a try. It looks easier than all the other methods of tool storage where you have to cut and shape foam to create the nests. Just watch which side the taper is on for some tools or they will be locked in the foam tight.

                    rock~
                    Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Today's polyurethane foam is many times better than the original yellow foam of years ago.
                      Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                      Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                      Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                      Monarch 10EE 1942

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have 2 gun cases that had that gray foam in them just fall apart. One is a S&W case,which I'd have hoped for better performance.

                        The question is,do those foams release any acid(like celluloid does) when they break down? That would really rust up your tools.

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                        • #13
                          I'm trying to think of a suitable insert to put next to the tools to give a finger grip. Any bright ideas?

                          George

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Georgineer
                            I'm trying to think of a suitable insert to put next to the tools to give a finger grip. Any bright ideas?

                            George
                            Ping pong ball halves.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Georgineer
                              I'm trying to think of a suitable insert to put next to the tools to give a finger grip. Any bright ideas?

                              George
                              little nubs of wood dowel. round over one end, and split along the axis. place next to tool where you want your finger holes.

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